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Floating Offshore Wind Power Possibilities and challenges for Norwegian Industry Carl Sixtensson Senior Consultant, DNV KEMA Renewable Energy.

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Presentation on theme: "Floating Offshore Wind Power Possibilities and challenges for Norwegian Industry Carl Sixtensson Senior Consultant, DNV KEMA Renewable Energy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Floating Offshore Wind Power Possibilities and challenges for Norwegian Industry Carl Sixtensson Senior Consultant, DNV KEMA Renewable Energy

2 Presentation outline 1. The context of floating wind 2. Emergence of a global market – focus on USA and Japan 3. Enablers and barriers for Norwegian companies – The case of Japan 4. Final conclusions 2

3 Floating Wind Turbines – A rapid development : The first full scale prototype deployed outside Karmøy, Norway 2012 & 2013: Years of global developments

4 4 1. The context of floating wind 2. Emergence of a global market – focus on USA and Japan 3. Enablers and barriers for Norwegian companies – The case of Japan 4. Final conclusions

5 EWEA The average European ONSHORE wind turbine Capacity: 2.2 MW Capacity factor: 24% Average annual energy production: 4,702 MWh This can power more than 1202 households The average European OFFSHORE wind turbine Capacity: 3.6 MW Capacity factor: 41% Average annual energy production: 12,961 MWh This can power more than 3312 households

6 A Floating wind turbine example – Statoils Hywind 6 50 % capacity factor in 2011 Extraordinary energy potential Source: Statoil

7 An ocean of different concepts - Innovations and a time of learning 7

8 The spar buoys 8 Hywind, Statoil Norway Weight-buoyancy stabilized with a relatively large draft Fairlead Anchor Schematic Anchor Water depth 4-6 times (up to 10-20) the waterdepth Few active components Well-proven technology Stable design Weight-buoyancy stabilized with relatively large draught

9 The semi-submersibles 9 Free-surface stabilized structure with relatively shallow draught WindFloat, Principle Power USA Fairlead Anchor 4-6 times (up to 10-20) the waterdepth Water depth Very flexible with regard to site Low requirments on soil conditions Simple installation Schematic

10 The Tension Leg Platforms 10 Tension restrained structure with relatively shallow draught PelaStar, GLOSTEN USA Schematic Anchor Water depth Tendon Small seabed footprint Low structural weight Few active systems/components

11 11 1. The context of floating wind 2. Emergence of a global market – focus on USA and Japan 3. Enablers and barriers for Norwegian companies – The case of Japan 4. Final conclusions

12 Global activities on floating wind – Some examples 12 Vast majority of wind resources in deep waters A very strong focus on floating wind, especially after Fukushima. Over 60% of resources in deep water US DOE funding of seven offshore wind projects, including three floating GW in waters beyond 60 m Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) -HiPRind project,11M, Inflow program, vertical axis turbines, long term goal of 26 MW ETI will fund a floating wind demonstration project to be tested at the UKs Wave Hub, Glostens PelaStar TLP Statoils Hywind Strong emphasis on research, protoype development etc. Considerable deep water resources NER300 funding for a 27 MW WindFloat array

13 US – Overview 13 US Department of Interior assessed the energy resources of the Outer Continental Shelf and concluded that almost the entire US electric energy needs could be met by deep water offshore wind solely. Over 60% of the wind resources in deep water, including all the offshore wind resources in Northern New England, the US West Coast and Hawaii (in water depths beyond 60 m) - floating offshore wind technologies is the only realistic and viable solution at many locations.

14 The US market actors 14 Key market actors DeepCwind consortium: is a group consisting of 36 industrial, university and national laboratoty partners, coordinated by the University of Maine through DOE funding. NREL: U.S. Department of Energy's primary national laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development Department of Energy: In mid- December 2012 DOE decided that three floating wind projects would receive funding for deep-water demonstration site developments. Initial funding of $4M is provided for development support and up to $47M in total. -Statoil -Principle Power -University of Maine

15 The DOE projects – Statoil 15 Hywind Photo: C.F. Salicath Statoil North America of Stamford, Connecticut plans to deploy four 3-megawatt wind turbines on floating spar buoy structures in the Gulf of Maine off Boothbay Harbor at a water depth of approximately 140 m. These spar buoys will be assembled in harbor to reduce installation costs and then towed to the installation site to access the Gulf of Maine's extensive deep water offshore wind resources. The $120M project gained key approval in late January 2013

16 The DOE projects – Principle Power 16 Washington-based Principle Power plans to install five semi-submersible floating foundations outfitted with 6-megawatt direct-drive offshore wind turbines. The project will be sited in deep water approximately 25 km from Coos Bay, Oregon. Detailed scope of work is under establishment Image: Renewable Energy Magazine Partners: Siemens Wind Power NREL Houston Offshore Engineering the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory the American Bureau of Shipping MacArtney Underwater Technology …

17 The DOE projects – University of Maine 17 The University of Maine plans to install a pilot floating offshore wind farm with two 6-megawatt direct-drive turbines on concrete semi-submersible foundations, total 12 MW, near Monhegan Island. The project will be using the VolturnUS floating platform technology developed at the Umaine Composites Center and builds on the success of the DeepCwind Consortium Research Program, These concrete foundations could result in improvements in commercial-scale production and provide offshore wind projects with a cost-effective alternative to traditional steel foundations

18 Japan – Overview 18

19 Japan – Current situation 19 Most nuclear reactors were closed down following the Fukushima accident in All-time high oil prices and Japan being highly dependent on imported gas to run their gas power plants act as brake on global economy. New energy sources are needed. Limited amount of space for new onshore installations, issues related to grid access, time- consuming environmental impact assessments and lengthy project construction times have weighed on the growth of the countrys wind industry. The JWPA claims there is potential to develop up to 519 GW of floating offshore wind and 94 GW of fixed offshore wind, as well as 169 GW of onshore wind, in Japan.

20 Market incentives 20 Japan introduced a new feed-in tariff for wind projects on 1 July 2012 of 23.1 yen (~ 0.2, ~ twice as much as the UK support for offshore wind projects) per kWh for 20 years, up from the roughly 15 yen (~ 0.13) being paid on contracts previously. For offshore wind the FIT is expected to be times this level The revised energy policy envisage investment in renewable energy sources of 380 billion over the next two decades. MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry) estimates that total investment in renewables could be in the vicinity of 495 billion by Reform the power transmission/distribution sector. 1. Ensure freedom of choice of electricity for all people 2. Enable all people to create electricity freely 3. Deliver all electricity to all people widely and neutrally Open electricity system for all people Supply-demand balance through competition and selection Reform Process of Japans Agency for Natural Resources and Energy

21 Japanese floating wind initiatives - Fukushima 21 Four different floating wind structures are planned to be installed off the coast of Fukushima during 2013 and Stage 1: A floating substation and a 2MW downwind floating turbine installed on a semi- submersible substruture will be installed. Stage 2: A 7MW turbine is planned to be installed on v-shaped semi-sub and an advanced spar solution respectively MW Fukushima Wind Farm?

22 Japanese floating wind initiatives - Kabashima 22 The Kabashima demonstration turbine: - A consortium including the Ministry of the Environment, Sasebo and Fuji have installed a 100kW downwind turbine on a Spar solution in the sea outside Kabashima. - A full scale solution with a 2MW turbine is planned for the summer of 2013 in this project funded by the Japanese government.

23 23 1. The context of floating wind 2. Emergence of a global market – focus on USA and Japan 3. Enablers and barriers for Norwegian companies – The case of Japan 4. Final conclusions

24 Japans ambition - Summary 24 Japan waters will be a laboratory in the coming years with the aim to establish an industry with an interational potential. We are likely to see: 1. Further technical development, prototype testing and building of small arrays – All strongly supported by the Japanese government. 2. Need to import Technologies/Methodologies – Learn from the industry 3. Japanese companies looking at international markets, for example in the waters between Taiwan and mainland China. Norwegian companies have a potential to assist Japanese (and other international) developments based on the experience gained from offshore activities and wind developments, in Norway and internationally..

25 The gaps needs to be identified – Potential for Norway 25 Advisory Services Technology qualification Certification New Technology, unique solutions O&M, Installation, Anchors, station keeping Standards & rules Consultancy

26 Joint Ventures 26 Japanese industrial firm Hitachi Zosen has teamed up with Statoil to strengthen their offshore wind ambitions. Feasibility studies into how the Hywind could be deployed in Japanese waters are underway. Hitachi Zosen has formed a consortium with six other companies to invest about 1.2 bn in Japanese offshore wind projects.

27 27 1. The context of floating wind 2. Emergence of a global market – focus on USA and Japan 3. Enablers and barriers for Norwegian companies – The case of Japan 4. Final conclusions

28 Final remarks 28 Significantly increased focus on floating wind structures globally. Incentives and developments in Europe, US and especially Japan (and Korea). One should not underestimate Japanese technology development and capacity to quickly adopt and find solutions to technical challenges. In order to enter the Japanese market financial muscles are likely to be required and/or a unique technology desired by Japanese firms. JVs are an effective way to create a business momentum in Japan (and elsewhere internationally) DNV have worked in close collaboration with several Japanese stakeholders through Joint Industry Projects etc.

29 Thank you!


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