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Building Capacity to Deliver a Volunteer-based Nationwide HIV Prevention Program for Kenyan Youth: The Evolution of a Collaborative Partnership Augusta.

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Presentation on theme: "Building Capacity to Deliver a Volunteer-based Nationwide HIV Prevention Program for Kenyan Youth: The Evolution of a Collaborative Partnership Augusta."— Presentation transcript:

1 Building Capacity to Deliver a Volunteer-based Nationwide HIV Prevention Program for Kenyan Youth: The Evolution of a Collaborative Partnership Augusta Muthigani National Executive Secretary, Commission for Education & Religious Education Kenya Episcopal Conference - Catholic Secretariat Satellite Session on Twinning XIX International AIDS Conference Washington, DC 25 July 2012

2 Presentation Overview Partnership Overview Key Successes and Programme Overview Evolution of the Partnership Since 2005 Lessons Learned Recommendations for Capacity Building Partnerships XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

3 Partnership Overview 25 KEC Dioceses throughout Kenya More than 1,611 KEC Schools in Kenya DePaul University KEC National Team AIHA Twinning Center XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012 PEPFAR (through CDC/Kenya) PEPFAR (through CDC/Kenya)

4 Largest Catholic University in the USA Multi-disciplinary team of faculty and staff who provide technical assistance in various areas: – HIV/AIDS interventions for youth and adolescents – Health communication – Organizational communication and development – Mass media and public relations – Monitoring and evaluation – International development Faith-Based Organization (Catholic Church) with infrastructure spanning all of Kenya Specifically within the Commission for Education and Religious Education Works to build capacity for schools, teachers, school managers, and field personnel in various areas Pastoral care and character formation of learners is a major focus Administers more than 6,000 primary schools across Kenya - roughly 30% of all Kenyan primary schools The Partners XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

5 Activities are Nationwide in Focus The partnership is currently implementing programs in 25 of Kenyas 26 Catholic Dioceses thanks to the support of the American people through PEPFAR and CDC/Kenya. XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

6 Key Partnership Successes: Since 2005, the partnership has been able to: – Develop a school-based HIV prevention programme for youth between the ages of 11 and 14 Implemented in 1,611 primary schools across Kenya Trained more than 3,724 teachers Reached more than 536,734 Kenyan youth – Adapted an evidence-based CDC-developed parenting and HIV prevention intervention for parents and guardians of youth Reached more than 2,246 parents and guardians – Developed and delivered weekly radio programming to reinforce key HIV prevention messages – Built the capacity of Diocesan staff in monitoring and evaluation XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

7 Programming Overview ABY MLRC FMP Love Life, Talk, and Live! ABY - Abstinence and Behaviour Change for Youth MLRC - Making Lifes Responsible Choices FMP - Families Matter! Programme XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

8 Complementary HIV Programming Radio Waumini (Community) FMP (Family) MLRC (Individual) Together, each component targets youth individually, within their families, and in the larger community with evidence-based or evidence-informed and culturally appropriate HIV prevention programming. XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

9 A Volunteer-driven Partnership Leverages over 400,000 volunteer hours a year from KEC school teachers and administrators, KEC religious personnel, and DePaul faculty, staff, and students This level of volunteerism is sustained by: – Working within existing KEC and DePaul infrastructure – Partnering with the public sector (Ministry of Education) – Establishing meaningful professional development opportunities for volunteer teachers – Utilizing a Training-of-Trainer (TOT) model – Using funds for administrative support and coordination – Focusing professional volunteer efforts on capacity building XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

10 Ongoing Partnership Activities Semi-Annual Quality Assurance o Refresher trainings for TOTs and teachers Monthly Technical Assistance o Conference calls o School visits Weekly Meetings o KEC team meets weekly o DPU team meets weekly o KEC monthly visits to schools o KEC-Diocesan quarterly meetings on programmatic and financial issues Annual Planning o Workplan Development o Financial training Quarterly Exchanges o Regular review and revision of M&E tools o Capacity-building workshops as needed o Quarterly Programmatic and Financial Reports XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

11 Importance of Partnership Exchanges Since 2005, the partnership has conducted a total of 26 quarterly exchanges to Chicago, USA, or Nairobi, Kenya, assisting with task and relational functioning. Exchanges to Kenya allow for the provision of hands-on technical assistance, trainings on relevant emerging programmatic issues, and monitoring and evaluation site visits. Exchanges to Chicago allow for technical assistance and capacity building workshops from expert faculty and staff across the entire University. Exchanges to Chicago also allow for sharing experience and observations from schools implementing related programs. XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

12 Capacity Building Workshops in Kenya, August 2008 XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

13 Monitoring and Evaluation Site Visit to Kenya, March 2011 XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

14 Partnership Exchange to DePaul University in Chicago, May 2011 XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

15 Evolution of Partnership Since : Development and Piloting of MLRC 2006-Present: Implementation, Scale-Up, and Monitoring of MLRC : Adaptation of FMP : Piloting of FMP 2009-Present: Outcome Evaluation of MLRC is due in September, Present: Implementation, Scale-Up, and Monitoring of FMP 2011-Present: Refining and Revising MLRC XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

16 Results of MLRC Implementation to Date XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

17 MLRC Programme in Numbers 2005 through March 2012 Boys Girls Total Pupils Year ,796 5,823 10,619 Year ,285 15,294 28,579 Year ,122 62, ,353 Year ,429 50, ,369 Year ,779 67, ,291 Year ,499 52,697 99,196 Year ,398 26,929 50,327 Cumulative Totals255, , ,734 XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

18 Lessons Learned The partnership has evolved over time: The initial focus was on quantity, but now there is a focus on quality and fidelity to the successful programs developed jointly by partners We began with one program, but others evolved out of community needs There were various unanticipated accomplishments for both partners that have enriched both institutions: Partners developed the capacity to respond quickly and effectively to changes in the epidemic, funder requirements and priorities, and changing political, social, cultural, and religious realities in Kenya Partners developed the capacity to update implementers (teachers) remotely on the latest trends, information on HIV, etc. XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012 There are many benefits from having a long-term capacity-building twinning partnership!

19 Lessons Learned o The complexities involved in international HIV prevention call for continued multidisciplinary collaborative efforts o Multiple perspectives on the contributing factors associated with the HIV/AIDS epidemic help to expand knowledge and skills beyond the confines of any one discipline or country of origin o They can promote program sustainability by building capacity in multiple areas, simultaneously o Sharing, utilization, and exchange of various skills that enhance the quality of program content and delivery XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012 There are many benefits from having a multidisciplinary twinning partnership!

20 Recommendations for Capacity-building Partnerships Exchanges to/from both institutions are important for task and relational functioning of the partnership Maintaining constant communication is essential (regular tele- conferences, , etc.) Volunteerism can be harnessed, but requires adequate administrative support Multi-disciplinary teams are most effective Direct funder involvement helps ensure quality programming and administration Tapping into the expertise of faculty is beneficial in terms of skills and cost effectiveness XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012

21 Acknowledgements The American International Health Alliance (AIHA), HIV/AIDS Twinning Center James Smith, Rebecca Sutton, Kathryn Utan, Kelly Wolfe The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Dr. Jennifer Galbraith (Kenya), Dr. Kim Miller (Atlanta) DePaul University Dr. Gary W. Harper, Dr. Alexandra G. Murphy, Leah C. Neubauer, Andrew J. Riplinger Kenya Episcopal Conference – Catholic Secretariat (KEC-CS) Rt. Rev. Maurice Crowley, Rev. Fr. Vincent Wambugu, Paul Muthiani, Julius Ruto, David Simiyu, Samuel Waweru XIX International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC, 25 July 2012 We would like to acknowledge our US Government funders at the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), along with the following people for their work in making this twinning partnership possible:

22 Asante Sana!


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