Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Capacity Development for New Public Water Systems.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Capacity Development for New Public Water Systems."— Presentation transcript:

1 Capacity Development for New Public Water Systems

2 State of Indiana Requirements Capacity assurance for new public water systems (community and nontransient noncommunity) Capacity assurance for new public water systems (community and nontransient noncommunity) Submittal of the Water System management Plan Submittal of the Water System management Plan

3 State of Indiana Requirements for New Public Water Systems What is a public water supply ? What is a public water supply ? Drinking water systems are defined in terms of the populations they serve Drinking water systems are defined in terms of the populations they serve Community water system Community water system Nontransient noncommunity water system Nontransient noncommunity water system

4 A Community Public Water System Consists of a public water system that serves at least 15 service connections used by year-round residents or regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents Consists of a public water system that serves at least 15 service connections used by year-round residents or regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents This may include a subdivision, a mobile home community or a regional water district. This may include a subdivision, a mobile home community or a regional water district.

5 Nontransient Noncommunity Public Water System Consists of a public water system that is not a community water system, which regularly serves the same 25 or more persons at least 6 months of the year (they do not live here). Consists of a public water system that is not a community water system, which regularly serves the same 25 or more persons at least 6 months of the year (they do not live here). Typical examples of a nontransient noncommunity public water system include schools, truck stops, factories, and businesses with more than 25 employees or daycare centers with 25 or more combined children and staff. Typical examples of a nontransient noncommunity public water system include schools, truck stops, factories, and businesses with more than 25 employees or daycare centers with 25 or more combined children and staff.

6 Fundamental Goals of Capacity Development To ensure consistent compliance with drinking water standards To ensure consistent compliance with drinking water standards To enhance water system performance To enhance water system performance To promote continuous improvement To promote continuous improvement

7 Fundamental Goals of Capacity Development Capacity development refers to the ability of a water system to produce and deliver safe drinking water that meets state and federal health standards. Capacity development refers to the ability of a water system to produce and deliver safe drinking water that meets state and federal health standards. Capacity development consists of three key components: technical capacity, financial capacity, and managerial capacity Capacity development consists of three key components: technical capacity, financial capacity, and managerial capacity

8 Technical Capacity Technical capacity refers to the physical and operational ability of a public water supply system to meet state and federal requirements Technical capacity refers to the physical and operational ability of a public water supply system to meet state and federal requirements The physical infrastructure of the water system includes, but is not limited to, the source water adequacy, infrastructure adequacy, and technical knowledge. The physical infrastructure of the water system includes, but is not limited to, the source water adequacy, infrastructure adequacy, and technical knowledge. In other words, does your treatment system work the way it is supposed to? Are you providing the safest and cleanest water possible required by law to your customers right now? Will you be able to do so in the future? In other words, does your treatment system work the way it is supposed to? Are you providing the safest and cleanest water possible required by law to your customers right now? Will you be able to do so in the future?

9 Financial Capacity Financial capacity refers to the ability of a public water supply system to acquire and manage sufficient financial resources to allow the system to achieve and maintain compliance with state and federal regulations. Financial capacity refers to the ability of a public water supply system to acquire and manage sufficient financial resources to allow the system to achieve and maintain compliance with state and federal regulations. Basically, does your system have a budget and enough revenue to cover costs, repairs, and replacements? Basically, does your system have a budget and enough revenue to cover costs, repairs, and replacements?

10 Managerial Capacity Managerial capacity refers to the ability of a public water supply system to conduct its affairs in a manner enabling the system to achieve and maintain compliance with state and federal regulations. Managerial capacity refers to the ability of a public water supply system to conduct its affairs in a manner enabling the system to achieve and maintain compliance with state and federal regulations. The management structure of the water system includes but is not limited to ownership accountability, staffing and organization, and effective linkages. The management structure of the water system includes but is not limited to ownership accountability, staffing and organization, and effective linkages. In simpler terms, do you have capable and trained staff? In simpler terms, do you have capable and trained staff?

11 State Requirements for New Water Systems Indiana must ensure that all new community water systems and noncommunity-nontransient (NTNC) water systems demonstrate technical, managerial and financial capacity for compliance prior to start-up Indiana must ensure that all new community water systems and noncommunity-nontransient (NTNC) water systems demonstrate technical, managerial and financial capacity for compliance prior to start-up

12 State Requirement for New Water Systems Indiana – Indiana – 327 IAC Community and NTNC systems built after Sept must submit a Water System Management Plan Community and NTNC systems built after Sept must submit a Water System Management Plan Must demonstrate technical, managerial and financial capacity before a construction permit is accepted. Must demonstrate technical, managerial and financial capacity before a construction permit is accepted.

13 Submittal of the Water System Management Plans A new public water supply systems must submit a Water System Management Plan (WSMP) demonstrating adequate technical, financial, and managerial capacity to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) for review and approval prior to submitting an application for a construction permit. A new public water supply systems must submit a Water System Management Plan (WSMP) demonstrating adequate technical, financial, and managerial capacity to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) for review and approval prior to submitting an application for a construction permit.IDEM

14 Submittal of the Water System Management Plans All new public water supply systems, as well as expanded systems that are newly classified as community or nontransient noncommunity systems, that will commence operation after October 1, 1999 must submit a Water System Management Plan to IDEM. All new public water supply systems, as well as expanded systems that are newly classified as community or nontransient noncommunity systems, that will commence operation after October 1, 1999 must submit a Water System Management Plan to IDEM.

15 Submittal of the Water System Management Plans If you are planning to develop a community water system or a nontransient noncommunity water system you must submit a Water System Management Plan (WSMP) demonstrating that the proposed system will have adequate technical, financial, and managerial capacity to construct, maintain, and operate a public drinking water system capable of meeting national Safe Drinking Water Act standards. If you are planning to develop a community water system or a nontransient noncommunity water system you must submit a Water System Management Plan (WSMP) demonstrating that the proposed system will have adequate technical, financial, and managerial capacity to construct, maintain, and operate a public drinking water system capable of meeting national Safe Drinking Water Act standards.

16 Submittal of the Water System Management Plans The WSMP is a comprehensive document that water systems should develop and use to make strategic decisions to ensure compliance with all appropriate regulations. Preparing a sound WSMP is itself a means of demonstrating capacity. The WSMP is a comprehensive document that water systems should develop and use to make strategic decisions to ensure compliance with all appropriate regulations. Preparing a sound WSMP is itself a means of demonstrating capacity.

17 Submittal of the Water System Management Plans Four copies of the WSMP must be submitted to the Drinking Water Branch of IDEM prior to the public water supply systems intended submission of an application for a construction permit, allowing at least one hundred twenty (120) days for review of the WSMP. Each plan will be reviewed for completeness and technical accuracy in terms of hydrogeological, engineering, financial, and other information. Any information that the applicant cannot provide must be identified as not applicable or not available and accompanied by an explanation as to why the information was not provided. Four copies of the WSMP must be submitted to the Drinking Water Branch of IDEM prior to the public water supply systems intended submission of an application for a construction permit, allowing at least one hundred twenty (120) days for review of the WSMP. Each plan will be reviewed for completeness and technical accuracy in terms of hydrogeological, engineering, financial, and other information. Any information that the applicant cannot provide must be identified as not applicable or not available and accompanied by an explanation as to why the information was not provided.

18 Approving of the Water System Management Plans The Drinking Water Branch may contact the applicant, by letter, to request omitted or supplemental information that is related to the Water System Management Plan of the proposed public water supply system. The Drinking Water Branch may contact the applicant, by letter, to request omitted or supplemental information that is related to the Water System Management Plan of the proposed public water supply system. If it is determined that the plan fails to demonstrate technical, financial, or managerial capacity of the proposed public water supply system, it will be denied and returned to the applicant. If it is determined that the plan fails to demonstrate technical, financial, or managerial capacity of the proposed public water supply system, it will be denied and returned to the applicant.

19 Letter of Certification for the Water System Management Plan If it is determined that the WSMP does demonstrate technical, financial, or managerial capacity of the proposed public water supply system, the applicant will receive a letter of certification and may proceed to submit an application for a construction permit. If it is determined that the WSMP does demonstrate technical, financial, or managerial capacity of the proposed public water supply system, the applicant will receive a letter of certification and may proceed to submit an application for a construction permit.

20 Contacts and Web Information Look for the Information Handbook on how to prepare a Water System Management Plan at water/index.html Look for the Information Handbook on how to prepare a Water System Management Plan at water/index.html water/index.html water/index.html Contact Mary Hoover at 317/ or at Contact Mary Hoover at 317/ or at Or Theresa Anderson at 317/ or at Or Theresa Anderson at 317/ or at Mary E. Hollingsworth at 317/ or at Mary E. Hollingsworth at 317/ or at


Download ppt "Capacity Development for New Public Water Systems."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google