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Building Community Capacity Workplace Advisors Briefing.

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Presentation on theme: "Building Community Capacity Workplace Advisors Briefing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Building Community Capacity Workplace Advisors Briefing

2 Activity Expectations: Spend a few minutes thinking what you want to achieve from this session: 1 2 3

3 In this session we will: Give an overview of the Building Community Capacity Programme Discuss the principles & structure of the programme Explore the role of the workplace advisor Explore health visitor participants journey Agree next steps for implementation

4 What is Building Community Capacity? Within this project we have found it useful to use the work of Skinner (2006). Skinner defined community capacity building as: Activities, resources and support that strengthen the skills, abilities and confidence of people and community groups to take effective action and leading roles in the development of communities. For health visitors this is clearly linked to the principles of health visiting, where health visitors act as a catalyst for identifying and enabling action by community groups and individual activists to address needs affecting health and wellbeing.

5 Its about health visiting...

6 In diverse settings...

7 Building Community Capacity to improve health and wellbeing for everyone

8 Why the Building Community Capacity Package for Health Visitors? Health Visitors have always worked with individuals, families and communities to promote health and well being. For many health visitors their focus, in the last decade, has moved away from communities and rested on individuals and families. Undertaking this work based project will refresh and refocus health visitors skills allowing them to deliver some key developments which make a real difference to communities...

9 First, well take you through the structure of the programme, from a participants point of view

10 One HVs journey This building community capacity package uses a workplace learning process which recognises the learning achieved by individuals as they carry out their professional duties and develop a work based project

11 Login and Registration

12 Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 Phase 5 Phase 6 Exploring your knowledge & skills, Developing of your learning contract Access support materials and master classes Developing your project proposal Managing your project Reporting back & Sharing your findings Reflection & ongoing development Your learning journey

13 PebblePad

14 Learning Journey Getting to know a bit about the programme and exploration of your knowledge and skills using skills check list. This forms a basis for the development of your personal learning contract. Phase 1

15 Undertake the learning activity that you have identified in order to meet your learning needs. Complete the master classes &/ or access reference material together with your own reflections using pebble pad Phase 2

16 Resources and Master Classes

17 Project agreed by employing organisation Engagement with relevant community stakeholders May involve: – Shadowing – Rapid Appraisal – Appreciative Inquiry SMART outcomes Developing your workplace project Phase 3

18 Use your project proposal and a time line/ Gantt chart to ensure you achieve key milestones. Meet with your workplace advisor to review progress Undertake interim project review with participants/ stakeholders as necessary. Phase 4 Managing your project

19 Your Work Based Project: Managing the project depends on effective working with colleagues and members of the local community to take change forward will also need to make good use of support from colleagues and others, face to face and through PebblePad

20 Reporting Back and Sharing Findings You will compile a project report as part of this process which you can share within your organisation & with other key stakeholders as appropriate. You may also give a presentation of project scope, outcomes and implications on future practice You will complete a final project brief and submit as part of overall evaluation Phase 5

21 Standard or Accredited The standard package, on completion, will enable all participants to gain evidence of CPD through a reflective portfolio. Your engagement with this learning process and submission of your learning contract, reflections and work based project report will be assessed against level 7 criteria. You can gain 30 credits at level 7 through Northumbria Universities accredited route.

22 Reflection, ongoing development of practice Learning gained Implications for your own practice Implication for your organisation Implication for the community Future recommendation Next steps Phase 6

23 Role of Workplace Advisor

24 To act as an organisational resource to enable participants to engage in the programme in order to undertake a work based project that will make a difference to communities. The role of the WPA is therefore an essential component of successful work based learning.

25 Activity What do you think are the key aspects of the workplace advisor role?

26 Key aspects of WPA include: Support participants to navigate the BCC package Help participants to identify opportunities within the organisation to address learning outcomes Act as a link between the participant and the employer with regard to identification, approval and implementation of learning activities including work based project Support reflective practice and communities of practice in order to build organisational capacity to BCC

27 Case Studies In the next section we will look at three real life case studies. In each case you will find some information about the area and its needs and resources. You will have the opportunity to consider a series of questions to help you think through aspects of your role as a Work Place Advisor.

28 Case study A

29 About the area... Jill works in an area west of the city, on an estate largely built in the 1950s, where there has been a lot of recent demolition of substandard housing, and due to funding cuts, relatively little new building. There are issues with drug abuse in the area. Some of the poorest remaining housing is allocated to asylum seekers.

30 About the area... At the local secondary school, rates of teenage pregnancy are the highest in the city. Many young mums are housed in the remaining three storey blocks of flats on the estate, which are quite spacious but have no lifts. Attainment at the school at GCSE barely meets government thresholds, though it has improved steadily over the past five years.

31 About the area... The area has a higher proportion of older people than the city as a whole, and many feel quite vulnerable. Young people have little to occupy them, though a youth project has begun to address this over the past five years, and the city built a multi user games area 3 years ago which is well used.

32 About the area... There are a few shops in the area, of which the Chinese takeaway seems to thrive most. The pub has been empty for more than four years, due to continued problems with drug users. The church hall is used by the credit union and tenants associations, and there is a toddler group meeting there.

33 Advising Jill... Jill is unsure where to focus her project – there seem to be so many needs. How might you advise her to proceed, and what factors would you want to take into account? Jill decides to focus on teenage pregnancy as her issue to address, but phones to ask what she should do next: how would you suggest she proceeds?

34 Advising Jill... Jill has decided, based on the evidence she has accessed, to work with young people to prevent teenage pregnancy – especially on personal development. Who else might she work with, and why? She brings her initial ideas to you: group work with the youth project to support and teach confidence, self esteem, negotiation skills, and linking with the local school to offer education and vocational development. Do you have any further suggestions to help her?

35 Advising Jill... How far does this project match strategic objectives in your organisation? How will the project she is proposing build community capacity? (If not, how could it be altered to do so?)

36 Advising Jill... Are there any additional resource needs apart from her time? How would you advise her to resolve them? Jill has a few ideas for key outcome measures. These need to be relevant to commissioners. Jill has suggested: Reductions in pregnancies, reductions in morning after pill, better attainment in relevant groups – can you suggest some more?

37 Did you think about...

38 Case study B

39 About the area... Janet has just qualified and has come to work in this suburban infill town, which has a long, stretched out main road. Shops radiate out from a central crossroads. There is a library, and a sheltered housing complex near the centre. There is quite a selection of charity shops, and a couple of supermarkets. Side streets are leafy – most houses semidetached. A large country park is close at hand.

40 About the area... The local primary school draws about two-thirds of its pupils from the immediate area whilst others travel from further afield. Though most students are white, a significant number are from other ethnic backgrounds. In the recent Ofsted inspection it was noted that though the percentage of pupils with learning difficulties and/or disabilities was below average, the percentage with a statement of special educational needs was higher than in most schools. The school was rated as outstanding. Secondary education in the area is mixed between state schools, again with good reputations, and a wide range of independent provision.

41 About the area... The majority of the families Janet visits have two parents working, often in professional jobs, many with long hours. There are many au pairs, and private day nurseries are common in the area. Many parents also involve their children in clubs and activities from an early age (swimming, ballet etc). Janet feels that she has already encountered quite a lot of stressed parents, and some, recently moved to the area, who are finding it difficult to make links. The GPs she works with report seeing quite a number of mums with anxiety related symptoms.

42 Advising Janet... Janet is unsure where to focus her project – most people seem very self sufficient. How might you advise her to proceed, and what factors would you want to take into account? Janet decides to focus on mothers mental health and wellbeing as her issue to address, but phones to ask what she should do next: how would you suggest she proceeds?

43 Advising Janet... Janet has decided, based on the evidence she has accessed, to look at ways to support mothers who are new to the area. Who else might she work with, and why? She brings her initial ideas to you: She wants to work with Netmums, the local primary school early years teacher and the local library to develop a regular drop in for mothers. Do you have any further suggestions to help her?

44 Advising Janet... How far does this project match strategic objectives in your organisation? How will the project she is proposing build community capacity? (If not, how could it be altered to do so?)

45 Advising Janet... Are there any additional resource needs apart from her time? How would you advise her to resolve them? Janet has a few ideas for key outcome measures. These need to be relevant to commissioners. Janet has suggested: Numbers attending the drop ins; Reductions in GP prescribing for antidepressants etc – can you advise / suggest some more?

46 Did you think about...

47 Case study C

48 About the area... Liz works in this apparently pleasant seaside town, and the surrounding area. There are good rail and road connections. In the summer the area is busy with tourists. The town has shops, restaurants, pubs, tea rooms etc., and a small repertory theatre. Tourism is the largest local influence on employment, with many people working in hotels and catering, or retail. Unemployment is above average for the county. There are also some extremely deprived areas locally, with around 10% of locals living in areas identified as among the most deprived 20% in the region.

49 About the area... Long term health conditions are common. In some outlying areas around the town, food shops and post offices are not easily accessible. Public transport is reliable but limited, and around a third of local people have no car.

50 About the area... The local primary school is rated as outstanding by OFSTED. It is larger than average and includes a nursery. Attainment on entry is lower than expected for four-year-olds. Though the numbers eligible for a free school meal appear to be average, pupils come from a wide range of social and economic backgrounds. The nearby secondary school is seen as good. At GCSE, the proportion of students getting five good grades is around the national average, and the trend is improving. However, OFSTED report that a minority of less able students do not progress as well as they should.

51 About the area... Though generally this is a law abiding community, some young people have been given community service orders for vandalism and unruly behaviour.

52 Advising Liz... Liz is unsure where to focus her project – she feels that she might look at the most deprived areas. How might you advise her to proceed, and what factors would you want to take into account? Liz decides to focus on unemployed parents as her issue to address, but phones to ask what she should do next: how would you suggest she proceeds?

53 Advising Liz... Liz has decided, based on the evidence she has accessed, to focus on parenting for children under two in families where parents are unemployed or seasonally employed. Who else might she work with, and why? She brings her initial ideas to you: she aims to implement a parenting programme which she has read about. Do you have any further suggestions to help her?

54 Advising Liz... How far does this project match strategic objectives in your organisation? How will the project she is proposing build community capacity? (If not, how could it be altered to do so?)

55 Advising Liz... Are there any additional resource needs apart from her time? How would you advise her to resolve them? Liz has a few ideas for key outcome measures. These need to be relevant to commissioners. Liz has suggested: sessions attended; improved attainment on entry – can you suggest some more?

56 Did you think about...

57 Facilitating learning... As a workplace adviser there is no right or wrong way to facilitate and support the learning of participants. The approach you take will be negotiated within your organisation and may depend on: Number of participants Geographical area. You could organise Action Learning Sets or Building Community Capacity Workshops, and communicate with participants using phone as well as Pebblepad

58 Working Creatively – Tools and Resources

59 Building Community Capacity is a core part of the new health visiting offer (1) Work Place Advisors are pivotal in helping health visitors to focus, think creatively and deliver for their communities.

60 NHS Reform is creating a different world which is more about prevention than delivery, where patients drive their own care, and services are delivered closer to home. In this brave new world, Thinking Differently will be a core capability of every NHS leader Helen Bevan, Director of Service Transformation, NHS Institute for Innovation & Improvement

61 Useful tools & techniques Simple project plan development Future state Thinking differently (NHSI)

62 Resources Listed below are some links and resources if f you need to refresh your knowledge of – Facilitation: – Learning styles:

63 Next Steps.. What will you do next?

64 Any queries? If you have any queries of an urgent nature, contact Pauline Pearson on Otherwise, use the contact page – thanks!


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