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1 Preparing Student Athletes for Academics and Athletics in NAIA Matthew Hanson Director Legislative Services.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Preparing Student Athletes for Academics and Athletics in NAIA Matthew Hanson Director Legislative Services."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Preparing Student Athletes for Academics and Athletics in NAIA Matthew Hanson Director Legislative Services

2 2 The NAIA exists to advance character-driven intercollegiate athletics The NAIA provides student-athletes the opportunity to continue playing sports complement and enhance an outstanding educational experience Every student-athlete matters and receives the personal attention they need to succeed The NAIA intentionally and proactively teaches character and prepares student-athletes to be tomorrows leaders About the NAIA

3 3 60,000 student-athletes play in the NAIA today The NAIA has close to 300 colleges and universities Student-athletes have the chance to compete in 23 national championships NAIA colleges and universities offer $450 million in athletic scholarships Keep Playing

4 4

5 5 Champions of Character provides training to ensure NAIA student-athletes know, do and value the right thing in all areas of life Five core values: integrity, respect, responsibility, sportsmanship and servant leadership These values are put into play, accounted for and measured at all NAIA schools Champions of Character

6 6 NAIA Championship Sports

7 7 Sports offered in the NAIA Championship Sports Mens Cross Country Womens Cross Country Football Mens Soccer Womens Soccer Volleyball Mens Basketball (two divisions) Womens Basketball (two divisions) Mens Swimming and Diving Womens Swimming and Diving Baseball Mens Golf Womens Golf Softball Mens Tennis Womens Tennis Mens Outdoor Track and Field Womens Outdoor Track and Field Mens Indoor Track and Field Womens Indoor Track and Field Wrestling

8 8 Where are NAIA schools located?

9 9 Connect with NAIA blog.PlayNAIA.org

10 10 The NAIA Eligibility Center

11 11 The NAIA Eligibility Center determines the academic and athletic eligibility of all prospective student-athletes It delivers on our larger promise of integrity by ensuring not only inbound eligibility but a level of fairness among competitors Student-athletes who register have a unique opportunity to connect personally with NAIA coaches before choosing their college The NAIA Eligibility Center

12 12 All first-time NAIA athletes must register NCAA and NAIA are different, separate organizations, and student athletes must register with both Register at Helping Students Navigate the Eligibility Center Process

13 13 Fee = $65 for U.S. students and $95 for international students Residency is based on student athletes current address Fee waivers are available based on need College transfer students – Pell Grant of at least $4,500 Registration fees and waivers

14 14 Transcripts must be official Transcripts must come directly from each applicable school Send a transcript from every attended institution of higher learning Send final transcript after the end of the last attended semester Sending transcripts

15 15 Create a customized Sport Resume and send it directly to NAIA coaches Include athletic achievements and any other academic or community involvement NAIA Connections

16 16 Visit Call Eligibility Center information?

17 17 Eligibility Basics NAIA student athletes: May participate four seasons in any one sport May compete during his/her first 10 semesters/15 quarters Must meet continuing eligibility requirements (24/36 Hour Rule & Progress Rule) Must be enrolled in at least 12 credit hours Must be making normal progress toward a 4 year degree Must have a 2.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale (for juniors and seniors athletically or academically) Must meet transfer eligibility requirements

18 18 Student Athletes may compete in 4 seasons of competition during their first 10 semesters / 15 quarters. The NAIA Terms of Attendance (TOA) policy gives student athletes more flexibility Terms need not be accumulated consecutively (there is no 5 year clock). How do I know the time without a clock?

19 19 Did that term just count? EXAMPLE: John enrolls in 12 credits and plays in a soccer game. He then withdraws from school without attending class. Did that term count? Yes, the term counts toward Johns term of attendance limit. Additionally, if he identifies at another school he will be charged an additional season of competition. EXAMPLE: Zach enrolls in 9 credits at a community college and attends one class before completely withdrawing. Zach then transfers to a NAIA school and enrolls in and completes 3 credits. Did that term count? No, the term does not count toward Zachs term of attendance limit. Although Zach enrolled in a total of 12 credits in the semester, he was never considered a full time student nor did he ever identify with either institution.

20 20 12 hours 12 hours Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Eligible for Fall total hours 4 hours Summer st academic year 2nd academic year 3rd academic year 4th academic year Continuing Eligibility – 24/36 hour rule To compete, a student must accumulate 24 semester credits during the students previous two semesters, or 36 quarter credits during the students previous three quarters

21 21 Continuing Eligibility – 24/36 hour rule 12 hours 12 hours Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Eligible for Spring total hours 4 hours Summer st academic year 2nd academic year 3rd academic year 4th academic year 8 hours Fall hours enrolled

22 22 1st academic year 2nd academic year 3rd academic year 4th academic year Not Eligible Fall hours 12 hours Spring hours Summer 2011 Continuing Eligibility – 24/36 hour rule 12 hours Fall hours Fall hours enrolled 4 hours Summer hours Spring 2011

23 23 Student participation and withdrawal from institution prior to start of academic term. (Note: Charged TOA & SOC, & Progress Rule applies Junior College transfer who needed less than 24 hours during last two semesters to get associates degree: Identified in no more than five semesters Passed all hours during term in which degree was earned First term of collegiate competition: If in first four semesters - Must meet freshman eligibility rules If in semesters five and above – 2.0 GPA in all courses attempted at all institutions. Exceptions: Continuing Eligibility – 24/36 hour rule

24 24 12 hours 12 hours Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Eligible for 2 nd Season of Competition 24 total hours 1st academic year 2nd academic year 3rd academic year 4th academic year Continuing Eligibility – Progress rule To compete, a student must accumulate 24 semester credits or 36 quarter credits prior to the Student Athletes 2 nd SOC.

25 25 Continuing Eligibility – Progress rule 1st academic year 2nd academic year 3rd academic year 4th academic year 12 hours 12 hours Fall 2009 Spring hours 12 hours Fall 2010 Spring 2011 Eligible for 3 nd Season of Competition 48 total hours To compete, a student must accumulate 48 semester credits or 72 quarter credits prior to the Student Athletes 3 rd SOC.

26 26 1st academic year 2nd academic year 3rd academic year 4th academic year Continuing Eligibility – Progress rule 12 hours 12 hours Fall 2009 Spring hours 12 hours Fall 2010 Spring 2011 To compete, a student must accumulate 72 semester credits or 108 quarter credits prior to the Student Athletes 4 th SOC. 12 hours 12 hours Fall 2011 Spring 2012 Eligible for 4 th Season of Competition 72 total hours

27 27 24 total hours 48 total hours 72 total hours 2.0 GPA 2.0 GPA 2.0 GPA 2.0 GPA 1st academic year 2nd academic year 3rd academic year 4th academic year must pass 9 hours 12 hours 12 hours 12 hours 12 hours 12 hours 12 hours 12 hours 12 hours Continuing Eligibility – Progress rule To compete in his or her 3 rd and 4 th SOC, a student athlete must have a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA on a 4.0 scale.

28 28 Transfer Rules Student previously identified at only a 2 year school: Student is not subject to any residency requirement. Student previously identified at a 4 year school: A student whose previous identification and participation is at a 4 year school must be in residence at an NAIA member institution for a period of 16 weeks prior to participation. EXCEPTION - The 16 week residency is waived if the Student Athlete (1) receives a written release from the previous athletics director and (2) has a cumulative GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

29 29 Does the Residency Rule Apply? Scenario: Jill competes in one year of swimming at a 2-year institution. She then transfers to a 4-year institution where she identifies and only practices with the squad. Jill wants to transfer to an NAIA member institution The residency rule does not apply and Jill does not need a written release. Scenario : Erica competes in tennis for two seasons at a 4- year institution. She transfers to a 2-year institution, enrolls in 12 credits and attends one class. Erica never competes at the 2-year institution and now wants to transfer to an NAIA member institution. The residency rule applies. Erica needs a written release from the athletics director at her 4-year institution and a 2.0 cumulative GPA, or she must sit the 16 week residency period at the NAIA institution.

30 30 Lets take a look at NAIA Eligibility Rules in Practice NAIA Flexibility at Work…

31 31 Problem Topics: Institutional Credit Defined: Any credit hour which counts toward an institutionally approved degree or any credit hour which is required by the institution for the student being certified. Further interpretation: A course that is not degree applicable may still count as institutional credit if it is 1) required for the student, 2) graded, and 3) awarded some type of credit. If a class is not awarded institutional credit, then it does not count toward terms of attendance charged, the 12-hour enrollment rule, or in meeting the progress and 24/36 hour rules. Application: Questions of institutional credit most often arise when a student has taken developmental courses. For transfer students, these courses may still count toward their initial eligibility, even if the classes do not transfer to his/her NAIA school.

32 32 Institutional Credit: Examples Example: A student takes a placement test and based on the scores the student achieves, the students school requires him/her to take a developmental math class that will not count toward the students degree. This class is awarded credit in the sense that it applies toward full-time status and financial aid eligibility for the student. The class is graded CR/NC (credit/no credit). This class will not count toward the students initial eligibility because it is not graded. Example: A student takes a placement test and based on the scores the student achieves, the students school requires him/her to take a developmental reading class that will not count toward the students degree. This class is awarded credit on the transcript and the student must earn a C or better to take a required college English class. This class will count toward the students initial eligibility because it is required, graded, and awarded credit.

33 33 Problem Topics: Transfer GPA Defined: The GPA for transfer students is calculated by dividing all quality points achieved by the total number of GPA hours attempted for all courses listed on all official transcripts from all institutions previously attended. Uses all courses listed on all transcripts (including schools where the student did not identify, but did enroll). Only uses hours that actually go into the GPA calculation for the particular school. Does not include Pass/Fail courses. If there are two types of hours, Hours Attempted and GPA Hours, the GPA Hours are used for the calculation. Only GPA hours attempted and quality points from the institution issuing the transcript apply. Application: Transfer students entering their third season of competition must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

34 34 Transfer GPA: Examples Example 1: Transcript A: 24 hours attempted, 24 hours earned, 73.5 quality points Transcript B: 18 hours attempted, 15 hours earned, 39.3 quality points Calculation: Total quality points ( ) =112.8 / 42 = 2.68 Total GPA hrs attempted ( ) Example 2: Transcript A: 32 hours attempted, 26 hours earned, 62 quality points Transcript B: 21 hours attempted, 21 hours earned, 17 GPA hours attempted, 39 quality points Calculation: Total quality points ( ) =101 / 49 = 2.06 Total GPA hrs attempted ( )

35 35 Game On naia.org


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