Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Innovation & Creativity: Selectively Drawing Upon Best Practices for a unified, disciplined approach September 2013 Joseph S. OHannigan Director, Learning.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Innovation & Creativity: Selectively Drawing Upon Best Practices for a unified, disciplined approach September 2013 Joseph S. OHannigan Director, Learning."— Presentation transcript:

1 Innovation & Creativity: Selectively Drawing Upon Best Practices for a unified, disciplined approach September 2013 Joseph S. OHannigan Director, Learning Solutions, 4:11 Business Associates Senior Associate Director, Custom & International Programs, Stayer Center for Executive Education, Mendoza College of Business, University of Notre Dame

2 Objectives & Outcomes Provide a powerful new framework See the world differently Lead innovation & change more effectively Leverage your native ability to be creative Integrate powerful tools & techniques Create a dynamic new network with other leaders

3 Review & Look Ahead Creativity & Innovation: It is within YOU o What do we mean by creativity? By innovation? o Why are some people and organizations so good at this? o Exploding some myths about innovation Do NOT focus on your products and services o Really. Everyone focuses here. Dont. o Broaden your view to see all TEN areas to innovate (Products & Services are just 2) Some of the best: creating a unified, disciplined approach to innovation o There are hundreds of tools and models and stories Start with the Ten Types Then on to effective approaches

4 Levels of Innovation Common Business definitions Extension of product/service New model, finish, design New to Company New to World Lean Design definitions Extension Incremental Breakthrough Disruptive Multiple types, even with small innovations, can produce Breakthrough and Disruptive results!

5 What areas might YOU Innovate? © 2013 Doblin; Deloitte Consulting LLP

6 Recall: Lean Thinking Focus on differentiating VALUE from WASTE (Everyone is a Waste Detective) Doing More and More with Less and Less, While Coming Closer and Closer to Giving the Customer Exactly What is Wanted (Toyota Production System) 6

7 A Lean Innovation Approach Using similar Lean thinking, we apply tools and concepts to the fuzzy front end of the Product Development Process to: Identify & Differentiate Value from Waste Give the customers exactly what they want Reduce the time to market Provide innovation focus 7

8 Apply Lean Innovation Tools * derived from 40 years of innovation tools and models *organized by Bart Huthwaites Institute for Lean Design Bart Huthwaite, Lean Design Coach Founder, Institute for Lean Design 8

9 The Mountain Model 1. End In View – What, Why & When 2. Obstacles – Boundaries & Hurdles 3. Strategy – Ten Types – Value Creation & Waste Prevention 4. Metrics – Measurement System & Baselines 5. Tactics – Innovative Tools 6. Action Plan – 90-day What, Who & When Action Plan Tactics Metrics Strategy Hurdles End In View Special thanks to Bart Huthwaite, Sr.Institute for Lean Design Special thanks to Bart Huthwaite, Sr. and the Institute for Lean Design 9

10 Begin with the End in View Why? –First step in bridging the gap from where you are to where you want to go. –Makes sure everyone is climbing the same mountain. –Builds common ground. 10

11 Boundaries vs. Hurdles No painter begins with an unlimited canvas… …This allows us to identify the limits of the task at hand. Boundaries are fixed and cannot be changed. Hurdles are challenges that can be overcome if the correct resources are brought to bear 11

12 Deliver Optimum Value, Prevent Lifecycle Waste -ilities, or Value Brothers Wasteful -ings or Gremlins The LEAN DESIGN EQUATION… Optimize Strategic -ilities, Minimize Evil -ings 12

13 All Customers Crave Eight Primary Values… Customer Primary Values What It Means Performability Will the product perform functionally the way I expect? Affordability Will it be within my cost expectation? Featureability Will it have the features that enhance its functions to provide me added benefits? Deliverability Will it be ready for me when I want it? Usability Can I quickly and easily install it, learn how to use it? Maintainability How easy will it be for me to keep in service? Durability Is it robust enough to withstand the abuse myself, and others give it? Imageability Will it convey the image of quality and prestige I desire? 13

14 Eight Primary Values Every Company Seeks… Company ValueWhat It Means Profitability Will the product deliver profits quickly & at a level acceptable to our company? Investability Will it require investment in people & equipment beyond expectations? Riskability Will it expose our company, either today or tomorrow, to excessive risk? Produceability Do we have, or can we acquire, the skills, experience, and equipment to build the product? Marketability Will we be able to sell it easily using our existing distribution channels? Growthability Does the market for the product offer significant growth and/or market share expansion? Leveragability Will it enable us to enter new growth markets? Respectability Will it convey the image of quality and prestige we desire? 14

15 Measuring the -ilities and -ings : Market Opportunities What Your Products/Services Lack Opportunities to Reduce Cost Where You Differentiate Performability Affordability Deliverability Useabiilty Durability Featureability Maintainability Imageability 15

16 Scoring the -Ilities Rating - Ility Value Level 9-10Extremely high value. Sets the standard for the industry 7-8High value. Superior to that of most competitors 5-6Acceptable. Meets expectations most of the time 3-4Low value. Frequently does not meet expectations 1-2Extremely low value. Well below that of all competitors 16

17 Identify Opportunities 17

18 Maintain Differentiation… Performability Affordability Featurability Deliverability Useability Maintainability Durability Imageability Product 1 Product 2 18

19 Customizing the –ilities Makes Strategy a Part of the Language Company #1 Imageability Knowledgeability Dell-ability Innovatability Credibility Breadth-ability Sensible Indulgence Easy Integrated Solution Company #2 Install-ability McDonalds-ability Flexibility Trust-ability Target-ability Dependability

20 Products & Services are becoming obsolete the minute they are introduced… The Three Sharks of Marketplace Technology Competition are eating the value in our products, services & organizations… 20

21 Three Sharks Exercise to See the Future Step - Now (months/years ) Stretch - Tomorrow ( months/years ) Leap - Future (months /years ) Marketplace Technology Competition Would a merger of competitors endanger your market position? Are overseas producers a threat? Are there any new competitors who may try to enter your market space by offering a simplified solution compared to yours? How competitive are you today? What are your differentiators? Are there any disruptive technologies emerging in the distant future that could obsolete your entire business? What new technologies do you anticipate emerging? Do you have the capability to develop these internally? Does your design take advantage of all existing technology? Are you pushing the technology too far? Are there any disruptive marketplace changes on the horizon? What are the top 5- 7 changes you anticipate in your customers Eight Primary Values? Does your design strategy address all the Eight Primary Values? Are you delivering too much? Too little? 21

22 7 Design Flaws that Add Cost & Reduce Reliability Seven EvilsDescription Complexity Many different processes required to deliver the products value both on factory floor and for the customers use. Precision Solution requiring precision at the outer limits of manufacturers ability to produce the product or customers ability to use it. Variability Specification of difficult to control processes on the factory floor or in the customers domain Sensitivity Solution easily flawed during factory operations or in the customers domain Immaturity Use of solution not previously validated for a specific application Danger Solutions with potential dangerous impact on humans or environment High Skill Solutions requiring high degree of training and experience 22

23 Scoring the -ings Rating -Ing Waste Level 9-10 Intolerable. Highest waste in the industry. 7-8 Excessive. Worse than most competitors. 5-6 Tolerable. High, but controllable. 3-4 Low. Minimum impact on cost & quality. 1-2 Extremely low. Well below that of all competitors 23

24 Measure the Evil –ings like the -ilities 24

25 Using the Cube to Brainstorm - Complex - Precise - Variable - Sensitive - Immature - Dangerous - High Skill The Three Sharks -Marketplace -Technology -Competition Optimize Strategic Ilities, Minimize Evil Ings - Sacrifice - Shrink - Switch - Divide - Unify - Recycle - Off-the-Shelf - Plus Up - Fix Up - Incremental - Extension - Breakthrough - Disruptive - Functions - Parts - Materials - Processes - People Innovation Levels Opportunity Targets - Performability - Affordability - Featureability - Deliverability - Usability - Maintainability - Durability - Imageability Company Ilities - Profitability - Investability - Riskability - Produceability - Marketability - Growthability - Leveragability - Respectability - Customer Use - Design - Supply Chain - Operations Lifecycle Domains Evil Ings Copyright by Bart Huthwaite, Sr. and the Institute of Lean Design 2005 From The Lean Design Solution: A Practical Guide to Streamlining Product Design and Development Customer Ilities Lean Innovation Tactics 25

26 Using the Cube to Brainstorm 26

27 For Any/ All of the Ten Areas to Innovate, © 2013 Doblin; Deloitte Consulting LLP

28 There Are Generally Five Opportunity Targets Functions Materials Parts Processes People 28

29 Apply Lean Design Tactics to the Targets Functions Materials Parts Processes People Sacrifice? Shrink? Switch? Divide? Unify? Re-Cycle? Off-the-Shelf? Plus Up? 29

30 FunctionsPartsMaterialsProcessesPeople Sacrifice Solutions Eliminate finish Eliminate metal parts in waterway Eliminate plating Eliminate Brazing,bright dip, plating, & buffing Outsource design or manufacture Shrinkage Solutions Reduce spout travelReduce # of nuts Wall thicknesses Tube length Assembly parts using tubes Reduce assembly complexity Switch Solutions Switch sprayer w/ other side functions Switch diverter & side spray with flexible spout Non-metallic waterways Threaded instead of brazed Substitute Injection Molding for machining brazing, buffing & coating Cross-train employees Division Solutions Sell side spray separately Separate faucet from baseplate Separate veggie sprayer from faucet Separate water contact & structural materials Sell side spray & faucet separately Dedicate team project time Style development by channel Unity Solutions One hole and 8 spread Combine valve body & cartridge One piece body One piece valve Combine models into one One piece flow for machining Platform partnerships Re-Cycle Solutions Directional sprayer 2-function sprayer Use Chrome appearance and PEX supplies Diamond valve Use stainless for plated look Machine plastic rod with screw machines Capture peoples ideas Partner with others Off-The-Shelf Solutions Flow aeratorQuick connects Purchase existing vendor model Use sister product components Purchase spout & cartridge Outsource design, market research, etc. Plus Up Solutions Integrated new functions Top-down mounting New valve cartridge Extend spout length New handles Robotic buffing Induction brazing Training & Skills 30

31 Next Steps… Classify new ideas from the 8x5 Matrix into Step, Stretch, & Leap timeframes Rank projects within the four levels of innovation by potential marketplace acceptance New to world? New to Organization? Incremental? Use marketplace feedback & internal team rankings 31

32 Developing the Product Road Map Conduct Gap Analysis – Look for holes in the Road Map – Conduct more focused brainstorming to address these Identify stretch & leap concepts that require immediate resources The result can be visual… 32

33 The Product Road Map 33

34 Worksheets & Application Tips 34

35 Three Sharks Exercise Step - Now (months/years ) Stretch - Tomorrow ( months/years ) Leap - Future (months /years ) Marketplace Technology Competition Would a merger of competitors endanger your market position? Are overseas producers a threat? Are there any new competitors who may try to enter your market space by offering a simplified solution compared to yours? How competitive are you today? What are your differentiators? Are there any disruptive technologies emerging in the distant future that could obsolete your entire business? What new technologies do you anticipate emerging? Do you have the capability to develop these internally? Does your design take advantage of all existing technology? Are you pushing the technology too far? Are there any disruptive marketplace changes on the horizon? What are the top 5-7 changes you anticipate in your customers Eight Primary Values? Does your design strategy address all the Eight Primary Values? Are you delivering too much? Too little? 35

36 Step - Now ( ) Stretch - Tomorrow ( ) Leap - Future ( ) Marketplace Technology Competition 36

37 Setting Our Objectives… What we are trying to accomplish Why we want to accomplish it When (by what date) we have to implement the plan If we dont know where were going any road will take us there… 37

38 Begin with the End in View Why? –First step in bridging the gap from where you are to where you want to go. –Makes sure everyone is climbing the same mountain. –Builds common ground. 38

39 What? Why? When? 39

40 Boundaries & Hurdles No painter begins with an unlimited canvas… –This allows us to identify the limits of the task at hand. Boundaries are fixed and cannot be changed. Hurdles are challenges that can be overcome if the correct resources are brought to bear 40

41 BoundariesHurdles 41

42 All Customers Crave Eight Primary Values… Customer Primary Values What It Means Performability Will the product perform functionally the way I expect? Affordability Will it be within my cost expectation? Featureability Will it have the features that enhance its functions to provide me added benefits? Deliverability Will it be ready for me when I want it? Usability Can I quickly and easily install it, learn how to use it? Maintainability How easy will it be for me to keep in service? Durability Is it robust enough to withstand the abuse myself, and others give it? Imageability Will it convey the image of quality and prestige I desire? 42

43 Customer Domain Primary Values Rating (1-10)Reasons Why Performability Affordability Featureability Deliverability Usability Maintainability Durability Imageability 43

44 Scoring the -ilities Rating - Ility Value Level 9-10Extremely high value. Sets the standard for the industry 7-8High value. Superior to that of most competitors 5-6Acceptable. Meets expectations most of the time 3-4Low value. Frequently does not meet expectations 1-2Extremely low value. Well below that of all competitors 44

45 …Eight Primary Values Every Company Seeks… Company ValueWhat It Means Profitability Will the product deliver profits quickly & at a level acceptable to our company? Investability Will it require investment in people & equipment beyond expectations? Riskability Will the it expose our company, either today or tomorrow, to excessive risk? Produceability Do we have, or can we acquire, the skills, experience, and equipment to build the product? Marketability Will we be able to sell it easily using our existing distribution channels? Growthability Does the market for the product offer significant growth and/or market share expansion? Leveragability Will it enable us to enter new growth markets? Respectability Will it convey the image of quality and prestige we desire? 45

46 Customer Domain Primary Values Rating (1-10)Reasons Why Profitability Investability Riskability Produceability Marketability Growthability Leverageability Respectability 46

47 Scoring the -ilities Rating - Ility Value Level 9-10Extremely high value. Sets the standard for the industry 7-8High value. Superior to that of most competitors 5-6Acceptable. Meets expectations most of the time 3-4Low value. Frequently does not meet expectations 1-2Extremely low value. Well below that of all competitors 47

48 Current State Mapping… 48

49 Customer Domain Primary Values Rating (1-10)Reasons Why Performability Affordability Featureability Deliverability Usability Maintainability Durability Imageability 49

50 Scoring the -ilities Rating - Ility Value Level 9-10Extremely high value. Sets the standard for the industry 7-8High value. Superior to that of most competitors 5-6Acceptable. Meets expectations most of the time 3-4Low value. Frequently does not meet expectations 1-2Extremely low value. Well below that of all competitors 50

51 Current State Mapping… 51

52 Does the Consumer Agree? Up until now, we have used our INTERNAL assessments of the company and competition to generate our scores. market-test We must market-test these opinions to see if we are connected to reality. Market Surveys Talking with the Customer and the Consumer Communities of Interest 52

53 Scoring the Evil –Ings… You dont need to be in the design field to address the evil –Ings. Use the evil –Ings scoring system to let your product designers know where there are opportunities to fix current problems The evil –Ings spider chart becomes a way to communicate issues between manufacturing and design 53

54 7 Design Flaws that Add Cost, Reduce Reliability Seven EvilsDescription Complexity Many different processes required to deliver the products value both on factory floor and for the customers use. Precision Solution requiring precision at the outer limits of manufacturers ability to produce the product or customers ability to use it. Variability Specification of difficult to control processes on the factory floor or in the customers domain Sensitivity Solution easily flawed during factory operations or in the customers domain Immaturity Use of solution not previously validated for a specific application Danger Solutions with potential dangerous impact on humans or environment High Skill Solutions requiring high degree of training and experience 54

55 Scoring the -Ings Rating -Ing Waste Level 9-10 Intolerable. Highest waste in the industry. 7-8 Excessive. Worse than most competitors. 5-6 Tolerable. High, but controllable. 3-4 Low. Minimum impact on cost & quality. 1-2 Extremely low. Well below that of all competitors 55

56 The Seven Evils Rating Why Complexity Precision Variability Sensitivity Immaturity Danger High Skill 56

57 57

58 Future State Mapping… Based on the information we now have, including the end-in-view, boundaries & hurdles, and three sharks, what does our future state look like? In your groups, come to consensus about what one or two Customer –ilities you want to move and what single –ing you want to address. 58

59 Future State Mapping… 59

60 Future State Mapping 60

61 Targets and Tactics… These two or three items are now the Strategy input to our focused brainstorming Ask yourself – What can I do to improve my –ility (or –ing) score from X to Y? Use the 8 x 5 Matrix to drive your brainstorming 61

62 Using the Cube to Brainstorm - Complex - Precise - Variable - Sensitive - Immature - Dangerous - High Skill The Three Sharks -Marketplace -Technology -Competition Optimize Strategic Ilities, Minimize Evil Ings - Sacrifice - Shrink - Switch - Divide - Unify - Recycle - Off-the-Shelf - Plus Up - Fix Up - Incremental - Extension - Breakthrough - Disruptive - Functions - Parts - Materials - Processes - People Innovation Levels Opportunity Targets - Performability - Affordability - Featureability - Deliverability - Usability - Maintainability - Durability - Imageability Company Ilities - Profitability - Investability - Riskability - Produceability - Marketability - Growthability - Leveragability - Respectability - Customer Use - Design - Supply Chain - Operations Lifecycle Domains Evil Ings Copyright by Bart Huthwaite, Sr. and the Institute of Lean Design 2005 From The Lean Design Solution: A Practical Guide to Streamlining Product Design and Development Customer Ilities Lean Innovation Tactics 62

63 FunctionsPartsMaterialsProcessesPeople Sacrifice Solutions Shrinkage Solutions Switch Solutions Division Solutions Unity Solutions Re-Cycle Solutions Off-The- Shelf Solutions Plus Up Solutions 63

64 Next Steps… Classify new ideas from the 8x5 Matrix into Step, Stretch, & Leap timeframes Rank projects within the four levels of innovation by potential marketplace acceptance New to world? New to organization? Incremental? Use marketplace feedback & internal team rankings 64

65 65

66 What Do I Do Next? 1.Market test your concepts 2.Add your current design projects to the map 3.Target Step, Stretch & Leap projects for concurrent development 4.Assess Resource Availability 66

67 Questions & Answers

68 4:11 Business Associates On the way of wisdom I direct you, I lead you on straight paths. When you walk your step will not be impeded, And should you run, you will not stumble. Hold fast to instruction, never let it go; Keep it, for it is your life. Proverbs 4:


Download ppt "Innovation & Creativity: Selectively Drawing Upon Best Practices for a unified, disciplined approach September 2013 Joseph S. OHannigan Director, Learning."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google