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Respiratory Hazard Assessment and Protection Suzanne Reister/Paula Vanderpool North Central ESD 171 509-667-7100/7110.

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Presentation on theme: "Respiratory Hazard Assessment and Protection Suzanne Reister/Paula Vanderpool North Central ESD 171 509-667-7100/7110."— Presentation transcript:

1 Respiratory Hazard Assessment and Protection Suzanne Reister/Paula Vanderpool North Central ESD /7110

2 Purpose of Training To acquaint you with DOSHs PPE rules, WAC (assessment) and 842 (respirator protection plan), as they apply to school districts.

3 Topics to Cover Washington Administrative Code (WAC) –Evaluation and Control of Employee Exposure –When to Require Respiratory Use –Contaminants and Hazard Areas/Jobs –Notify Employees of Hazards and Exposures –Permissible Exposure Limits and Respiratory Selection Washington Administrative Code (WAC) –Requirements of Required and Voluntary Use Plan

4 WAC Respiratory Hazards WAC

5 Evaluate Exposure WAC requires the evaluation of work areas that have airborne contaminant exposure.

6 Areas of Potential Airborne Contaminants Chemicals in shops; transportation, maintenance, boiler rooms, custodial. Chemicals used by grounds.

7 Areas of Potential Airborne Contaminants Print Shop Chemicals Particulate from sanding or chemicals from finishing in wood shop Asbestos in facilities during maintenance. Particulate and metals from grinding or welding during fabrication

8 Identification Job Hazard Analysis Check MSDS for listed chemicals Particulate Sources without an MSDS –Existing Building Materials Oxygen Deficiency Biologicals (viruses, mold)

9 Exposure Assessment Through Estimation Reasonably Estimate –Manufacturers Information –Observations –Measurements/Calculations –Other Industry Information –Duration of Use –Ventilation

10 Exposure Assessment Through Testing Use NIOSH approved sampling methods –http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nmam/http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nmam/ Ensure appropriate sampling method/media Overloading & breakthrough Sampling limitations

11 Air Monitoring Continued Consider contracting professional industrial hygienist Phone book under Safety Consultants

12 Document, Document, Document Describe the job List the airborne hazard Describe the steps of the exposure assessment Explain the determination Include all information used to make a determination

13 Control Exposure WAC requires the use of engineering or administrative controls before using respirators. Feasible Controls to below PEL or Lowest Achievable Using Respirators is Costly and Time Consuming!

14 Administrative Controls Chemical Substitution Change the Process Separate Employees Work Practices Job Rotation

15 Engineering Controls Removing Emissions from the Source –Hoods –Shrouds –Enclosure with negative air/filtration Diluting Emissions –Ventilation Natural Forced

16 Forced Ventilation

17 Update Job Hazard Analysis Appendix D JHA PPE Section Determination Documentation –May require supplemental letter outlining exposure assessment process used Inform employees

18 WAC Respirators You have an exposure you cannot control so you need to provide respirators.

19 Steps in Implementation Designate a Program Administrator Written Plan Select Respirators (Steps in WAC ) Medical Evaluations/Fit Testing Training Maintenance

20 Respirator Types Dust Mask Full Face Cartridge Powered Air Cartridge Supplied Air Self Contained Breathing Apparatus Escape SCBA

21 How Filtering Facepieces Work Air inhaled in Air exhaled out

22 Using Filtering Facepieces Limits of dust masks Dust masks will leak if they dont fit your face properly. Dust masks dont filter out chemical vapors. Dust masks are not adequate for heavy amounts of dust. Dust masks may not be suitable for highly toxic dusts.

23 Dust Mask Protection Factor How much protection does a dust mask give? Dust masks only provide protection to levels 10 times above the chemical or dust permissible exposure limit (PEL). Example Wood dust permissible limit – 5 mg/cu. meter Dust mask protects up to 50 mg/cu. meter mg/cu. meter = milligrams per cubic meter

24 NIOSH–Approved Dust Masks Dust masks come in variety of styles and brands. Not all dust masks provide adequate protection for workplace dust. Only NIOSH-approved dust masks can be used for protection against dust levels that exceed the PEL. Not NIOSH-approvedNIOSH-approved

25 How Respirators Work Air inhaled in Air exhaled out Air inhaled in

26 How Respirators Work How Cartridge Respirators Work Air movement is controlled by rubber inhalation and exhalation valves. The adjustable straps are used to keep the respirator snug on the face. straps inhalation valves Facepiece cartridge valve cover exhalation valve

27 Respirator Cartridges Types of Cartridges Dust cartridges filter out dust only. Chemical cartridges trap different types of chemicals, but not dust. Cartridges are color-coded for the type of chemical or dust.

28 Voluntary Respiratory Use Must be approved by employer and ensure the following: –Cannot interfere with work, vision, communication –Cannot create health hazards (skin irritation, illness (sharing respirators), unsafe air supply Provide advisory information (Table 2) Develop a written plan Provide training Maintain and repair respirators when necessary Recordkeeping – medical

29 Dust Mask Voluntary Use Requirements Must be approved by employer Employer must provide advisory information (Table 2) No written plan if only dust mask No training No providing respirators, training, medical or fit testing

30 Mandatory Respiratory Use Designate Program Administrator Develop a Written Plan Recordkeeping Medical Evaluation Fit Testing Training Maintenance Safe Use

31 Employee Training When/Where it must be worn How to put it on and take it off How to know if it fits How to inspect How to keep clean How to keep maintained How to store Limitations

32 Written Plan –Designated Program Administrator –Hazard Assessment Certifications –Respirator Selection –Medical Evaluation Provisions –Fit Test Procedures –Training Provisions –Respirator Use Procedures –Maintenance –Procedure for Monitoring Program Effectiveness

33 Summary Washington Administrative Code (WAC) –Evaluation and Control of Employee Exposure –When to Require Respiratory Use –Contaminants and Hazard Areas/Jobs –Notify Employees of Hazards and Exposures –Permissible Exposure Limits and Respiratory Selection Washington Administrative Code (WAC) –Requirements of Required and Voluntary Use Plan


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