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US&R Rescuer Safety. General Hazards Structural Instability Overhead Hazards Surface Hazards Water Hazards Ground Disruptions Heavy Equipment Below Grade.

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Presentation on theme: "US&R Rescuer Safety. General Hazards Structural Instability Overhead Hazards Surface Hazards Water Hazards Ground Disruptions Heavy Equipment Below Grade."— Presentation transcript:

1 US&R Rescuer Safety

2 General Hazards Structural Instability Overhead Hazards Surface Hazards Water Hazards Ground Disruptions Heavy Equipment Below Grade Hazards

3 Utility Hazards Natural Gas or Propane Electricity Water Steam Sewage

4 Hazardous Materials Reference – Ca. Health and Safety Code Residential Hazardous Materials –Kitchen, Laundry, Garages/Storage Sheds Commercial Hazardous Materials –Supermarkets, Hardware, Schools, Hospitals, Laboratories

5 Other Hazards Fire Explosion Vibrations Particulate Matter Confined Space Issues – Tool Use Loud Noise Uncoordinated Rescue Operations

6 General Types of Building Construction Hazards Light Frame Heavy Wall Construction Heavy Floor Construction Precast Construction

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8 Light Frame Hazards Weakened wall and connections Broken utilities Combustible materials Cracked or leaning walls Separation from foundations Cracked or leaning chimneys or veneer walls Separated porch or upper story connections Loose roof tiles or roof equipment Broken glass and damaged door frames

9 BRICK PATTERN THAT IDENTIFIES UNREINFORCED MASONRY. HAS BOND (HEADER) ROW AT ABOUT EVERY SIX ROWS. AT FRONTS OF BUILDINGS, THE PATTERN MAY BE HIDDEN BY FANCY MASONRY VENEER

10 Heavy Wall Hazards Weakened perimeter load bearing walls and connection to floor and roofs Broken utilities Broken parapets, chimneys, ornamental masonry Broken walls and columns Broken structural connections Cracked wall corners, windows, door frames Unsupported collapsed floors Loose HVAC or roof equipment

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12 Heavy Floor Hazards Weakened columns and poor connections between floors and columns Broken utilities Empty cage – concrete column failure Broken structural connections Diagonal shear cracking in support beams Broken infill or shear walls Loose HVAC or roof equipment

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14 Precast Construction Hazards Weakened interconnection of structural components – floors, wall panels and beams Broken utilities Broken walls, cracked corbels at beam-to- column connections Cracked columns at top and bottom joints Broken wall panels Loose HVAC or roof equipment

15 Collapse Patterns Lean-To V-Shape Pancake Cantilever

16 Collapse Patterns Lean-to collapse V-shape collapse Pancake collapse Cantilever collapse

17 Personal Protective Equipment Helmets or hard hats, gloves, safety boots Eye protection-goggles or glasses Hearing protection Respiratory protection –Dust masks, APRs, B/As Flashlights or head lamps Flash protection-brush gear, coveralls Knee pads Communications gear Personal alarm device

18 Safety Considerations Lookouts, communications, escape routes, safe zones Safety Officer duties – 1 per incident –Watch for hazards –Scene safety –No active participation with rescue – hands on –Utilize a safety check list –Use buddy system – teams of 2 that stay together

19 Communications Communications plan – part of IAP Portable radio and PAD for each rescuer Maintain continuous voice or radio contact Constant progress reports to leader Coordinate with other rescue teams Prearrange emergency evacuation signal Communications with entrapped rescuers

20 Escape Routes Pre-established paths to safe zones Considerations –Direct path may not be the best option –Remain in place may be good option –Constant updating of egress pathways

21 Safe Zones Pre-established area of safe refuse from hazards Can be in or out of hot zone area Personnel accountability procedure must be used –Immediate relay of information must be relayed to operations

22 Personnel Accountability System Keeps track of all members at all times Assign officer to keep track Conduct checks after any emergency evacuations, periodically throughout incident and when leaving work area

23 Other Considerations Rescuer hydration –8 to 12 oz water every 30 minutes during heavy work Team Rotations –Rotate on regular basis –Consider 15 to 30 minutes for heavy work Personal hygiene –Wash hands and face prior to eating, leaving work area –Eat or drink only properly prepared and stored foods Stress factors –Prolonged rescue operations –Fatigue and psychological


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