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Trainer Gerard McCarthy. Aims and Objectives To look at current fire legislation To identify fire prevention, precaution and protection measures. To examine.

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Presentation on theme: "Trainer Gerard McCarthy. Aims and Objectives To look at current fire legislation To identify fire prevention, precaution and protection measures. To examine."— Presentation transcript:

1 Trainer Gerard McCarthy

2 Aims and Objectives To look at current fire legislation To identify fire prevention, precaution and protection measures. To examine the role of the Fire Warden / Marshall

3 LEGISLATION Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order (2005) Employers, or anyone who has control of a workplace, have the obligation to provide: A means of detecting fire and raising the alarm. A means of escape. A means of fighting the fire

4 LEGISLATION Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order (2005) Employers are also obliged to carry out a fire risk assessment of the workplace, to: Indentify the hazards. Identify persons at risk. Evaluate the risk. Record findings. Review the assessment regularly.

5 Formal Training Employers are also required to provide formal training in fire precautions and procedures. Fires in the workplace commonly occur because: They have been started deliberately People are unaware or careless of the fire hazard

6 Compliance with Legislation If legislation is complied with, the risk of prosecution is lessened, but more importantly, Fire precautions and training saves and protects: Lives Property Jobs

7 Fire prevention Equipment: only operate, service and maintain according to manufactures instructions, regular inspection and testing, dont overload extension cables, switch off and isolate equipment which is not in use, (end of day, holiday periods etc). Contractors: ensure they are safe, work is authorised and monitored.

8 Fire prevention Good procedures: Safe working practices, regular inspections, end of day close down procedure, Staff training. Good house-keeping: clean and tidy workplace, waste removal. Storage: appropriate storage areas, sufficiently spaced, only store enough materials for immediate operational needs.

9 Fire protection Fire Doors: not to be wedged open. Fire Exits: routes to remain free of obstacles, emergency fastenings should be checked weekly. Emergency Lighting: check indicator lamps within the unit are lit. test on a monthly basis, serviced every 6 months. Evacuation Signage: clearly placed on evacuation route until final exit is reached.

10 Fire protection Alarm Systems: call points are available at all times, ensure console indicates normal operation on a daily basis and the system is sounded weekly. Fire Fighting Equipment: must be available at all times, weekly inspection(basic check on tamper indicators, pressure indicator, signs of damage, serviced on an annual basis by a competent engineer

11 Fire protection Staff Training: all new staff to be instructed in evacuation procedures during induction process, then on a regular basis (at least annually for day shift workers and quarterly for night shift workers).

12 Behaviour of Fire Fire starts in ground floor room Smoke and heat escape though open door Heat and smoke rise up through stairway Heat and smoke spreads through upper floors

13 Actions to be carried out in the event of a fire On discovery of a fire: Raise the alarm. Leave by the nearest exit (take any visitors with you. Do not stop to pick up belongings). Close windows and doors behind you. Do not use lifts. Move to the assembly area immediately make sure you are accounted for by the designated person. Do not re-enter the building until all clear has been given.

14 Actions to be carried out in the event of a fire On hearing the fire alarm: Leave by the nearest exit (take any visitors with you. Do not stop to pick up belongings). Close windows and doors behind you. Do not use lifts. Move to the assembly area immediately make sure you are accounted for by the designated person. Do not re-enter the building until all clear has been given.

15 Actions to be carried out in the event of a fire If assisting with the evacuation: Begin sweep of the area from the furthest point away from your nearest exit so you are always heading towards a place of safety. Check all persons have evacuated, (it is important to check any toilet areas and individual cubicles. Never open a door if you suspect there may be fire beyond it. Instruct any persons to evacuate immediately, usher visitors to the exit.

16 Actions to be carried out in the event of a fire Do not delay your own evacuation if somebody refuses to evacuate. Inform the designated person as soon as you reach the assembly point.

17 General rules for fighting a fire Always raise the alarm first Only attempt to tackle a fire if you have received training in the safe operation of the fire fighting equipment and only if it is safe to do so. Make sure you select the correct type of extinguisher. Do not attempt to tackle a fire if you are unsure what is burning or if in doubt about using the equipment. Extinguishers are designed for small fires in the initial stages.

18 General rules for fighting a fire Always tackle a fire from the furthest point possible. Always have a means of escape available to you. Do not let the fire to get between you and a means of escape. If the fire continues to grow or it is too dangerous to continue, abandon it close the door behind you and evacuate the building. Report your actions to the designated person at the assembly point.

19 Fire triangle...\CIEH Programme\Level 2\Christmas Tree Fire Safety.mp4 StarvationSmother Cooling

20 WATER Class A Fires Use on: Wood, Paper, Textiles Do not use on; Live electrical equipment, flammable liquids, cooking oils or fats Co2 Class B Fires Use on: Flammable liquids Safe to use on live electrical equipment Do not use on; Cooking oils or fats. Use caution in confined space (replaces oxygen in room) Danger of re-ignition DO NOT hold discharge horn

21 Dry Powder Class A B C Fires Use on: Wood, Paper, Textiles, Flammable liquids. Gases* Safe to use on live electrical equipment Do not use on; Cooking oils or fats. Danger of re-ignition *Gas supply should be turned off due to the explosive nature of Gas Foam (AFFF) Aqueous Film Forming Foam Class A B Fires Use on: Wood, Paper, Textiles, Flammable liquids. Do not use on; Some foam extinguishers are not suitable for use on live electrics

22 Wet Chemical Class A F Fires Use on: Wood, Paper, Textiles, Cooking oils and fats Do not use on; Live electrical equipment, Flammable liquids Fire Blankets Fire blankets are made of highly fire-resistant materials. Usually they are found in areas where there is a splash hazard of flammable liquid. Their most anticipated use would be to throw around a person whose clothes have caught fire, to smother the fire. Other possible uses would be to smother a small free-standing fire, or to wrap someone protectively who needs to pass through an inflamed area to get to safety.

23 The principal duties of the fire warden are to: Take appropriate and effective action if a fire occurs. Ensure that escape routes are available for use. Identify potential hazards in the workplace. Record and report their observations. Conduct a sweep of pre-designated area to ensure occupants have evacuated.

24 The principal duties of the fire warden are to: Ensure that the alarm has been raised. Check that manufacturing processes have been made safe. Evacuate staff from the building or area involved. Check that any staff or visitors with disabilities are assisted as planned. Call the reporting centre and give details of the location, severity and cause of the fire, if known, fight the fire if it is safe to do so.


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