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This presentation is adapted from a PowerPoint presentation by Spike Wilson Theatre artist at Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana.

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Presentation on theme: "This presentation is adapted from a PowerPoint presentation by Spike Wilson Theatre artist at Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana."— Presentation transcript:

1 This presentation is adapted from a PowerPoint presentation by Spike Wilson Theatre artist at Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana

2 Parts, Maintenance, Safety, and Use

3 1. Learn the exterior and interior parts of a stage lighting instrument. 2. Use the instrument as a learning tool: learn the practical and artistic uses of stage lighting. 3. Use the instrument as a learning tool: learn what trades and fields of study go into the creation and use of stage instruments. 4. Have a general concept of a) how the instrument works, b) how to maintain the instrument, and c) general safety measures for the instrument.

4 Review of the PowerPoint and application in the lab make up the rest of your learning process!

5 Stage lights are called instruments. The bulbs in instruments are called lamps. Putting an instrument up on the grid is called hanging. A circuit is an outlet in the wall. Plugging in the instrument to a circuit is called patching. Pointing an instrument in the appropriate direction, and adjusting the beam width and shape, are called focusing.

6 To understand the parts of a lighting instrument, we will look at one of the most common examples… … an ETC Source Four ERS 750 (36˚). The Lekko

7 ETC Par Four 750 (36˚) means… ETC = Electronic Theatre Controls ® ERS = Ellipsoidal Reflector Spotlight 750 = Maximum Wattage Rating (750 watts) We use 500 watt bulbs at the Emerson! 36˚ = Field Angle

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9 C-Clamp (Pipe Clamp) Yoke Lamp Housing Power Cable (Pigtail) Shutter Handle Gel Frame Holder Grand Stage Pin (GSP) Instrument Barrel (Lens Tube inside) Reflector Housing

10 Now that you are acquainted with the parts of a stage lighting instrument, lets see what different trades and fields of study go into its construction.

11 Physics & Machining Physics, Machining, & Industrial Tech Electrical Engineering Electrics & Energy Tech Visual Art, Color Theory, & Optics Electrical Engineering & Energy Tech Machining & Industrial Tech HVAC

12 Theres a lot of tech in theatre technology.

13 Stage PinEdison Most professional theaters! The Emersons as well as your home

14 Secures Lamp Housing Adjusts Angle & Position of Lamp (Bulb) within Housing

15 SLIDER HANDLE: Adjusts edges of light throw GEL CLIP: Secures Gel Frame and Color Gel BEAM FOCUS KNOB: Adjusts sharpness of light edge GEL FRAME HOLDER: Holds Gel Frame and Color Gel in place

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19 Lamp Clip Pigtail Bolt secures lamp housing Lamp (Bulb)

20 LAMP Specs Watts: 750 Volts: Amperage: life hours (total hours of use at full intensity) Lumens: 23,000 Total length: inches. Glass Shape: T Diameter of glass: 0.75 inches Base: G9.5 Heatsink (two pin) Filament Type: 4C8 (Tungsten) Gas around filament: Halogen Price (2013): about $34 to $45

21 C-Clamp Twist handle controls yoke position. Yoke

22 Glass portion of lamp (bulb) fits through here. Since a lamp (bulb) shines in all directions, the reflector redirects the light through the barrel and out the front of the instrument.

23 shutters in pulled position Shape of light on flat surface == = shuttered light = Shape of light on flat surface

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25 Inner Lens Outer Lens Gel Frame Holder FRONT OF BARREL

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28 Yellow lines with arrows = beams of light originating from lamp. Glass portion of LAMP REFLECTOR Small Plano Convex LENS Large Plano Convex LENS Wall of lens tube : both sides are black-painted metal (to reduce reflectivity) Wall of lens tube : both sides are black-painted metal (to reduce reflectivity)

29 This is as simple as using canned air or a dry, soft washcloth!

30 This is (also) as simple as using canned air or a dry, soft washcloth!

31 1) Follow general electricity precautions (e.g., never touch anything electrical with wet hands). 2) Heat-resistant gloves are recommended. Even the exterior of an instrument becomes very hot within a few minutes! 3) NEVER look directly into the lens of the light when less than 5 feet from it. 4) NEVER look directly at a lamp that is on but not in the lamp housing! 5) Violation of rules 3 and 4 can cause permanent damage to the retinas of your eyes. 6) BEFORE you take both hands off the instrument, ALWAYS make sure a) the pipe clamp is fully tightened, and b) the safety cable is attached to both the instrument and the pipe or batten. 7) Always tie your wrench to your belt loop with theatrical tie-line.

32 Example of silhouette (back) lighting. Example of multidirectional, Overhead (top) lighting.

33 PRACTICAL USES Indicate and separate locations. Hide or reveal people and objects. Show passage of time, time of day, season, beginning/end of scene or play. Project shadows. Create colors and shapes on surfaces. ARTISTIC USES Establish mood. Highlight aspects of plot. Indicate a characters emotional state. Establish the Fourth Wall (division between the plots world and audiences world).

34 Production: Pittsburgh Repertory Theatres Nocturnal Wanderer by Gao Xingjian. Director: Paul Spike Wilson. Lighting Designer: Peter Fedyshin. Photo by: Heather Garmin

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36 ++ Source 4 Gobo Holder Gobo

37 =

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39 Photo owned by Real Sound and Vision, Inc. Fair Use applies.

40 See Effects of Top Light Front Light Back Light Hi Sides Light Footlight Specials

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42 The Reflector

43 The Ellipsoidal Lens The Fresnel Lens

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45 Pros Cheap Lightweight Soft Edges Cons Hard To Focus Limited to wash Very Hot Uses Backlight Fill Light

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49 R40 Strip Lights 3 circuits Scoop The inky Follow spot

50 Hang and circuit an ERS, ERF, and Par can into the grid Compare and Contrast the Instruments


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