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The Effect of Wind on the Rate of Transpiration Nicole Chernavsky Nadia Zivkov Cassandra Zhi.

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Presentation on theme: "The Effect of Wind on the Rate of Transpiration Nicole Chernavsky Nadia Zivkov Cassandra Zhi."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Effect of Wind on the Rate of Transpiration Nicole Chernavsky Nadia Zivkov Cassandra Zhi

2 Research Question How does wind strength* affect the rate of transpiration? *Different fan distances of wind (40 cm, 70 cm, 100 cm, 130 cm, 160 cm)

3 Why is this important? Certain species of plants require different amounts of water due to different rates of transpiration, which vary depending on the wind level of the environment Plants in more windy environments will require more water When there is too much wind, the stomata may even close Too expensive to water certain plants For farmers, it is too expensive to farm certain crops because of the extensive amount of water needed to counter the excessive amount of transpiration caused by a windy environment Therefore, the wind level should be taken into consideration when farmers choose which crops to plant at different times of the year in order to prevent excess transpiration or closure of the stomata

4 Variables Independent variable: Distance of plant cuttings from fan (cm) (40, 70, 100, 130, 160 cm) Dependent variable: Barometric pressure (mm Hg) created by transpiration of plant cutting

5 Controlled Variables How Method Allows for the Control of Key Variables Light distanceAll plant cutting were held 30 cm from the light source Type of plantThe same plant cutting species was used for all trials Fan speedThe same fan with the same wind setting (2- medium) was used for all trials Time for data collectionAll trials were held for 10 minutes each and data was recorded every 10 seconds Time for acclimationAll trials were allowed 5 minutes to acclimate to new environment between trials Wattage of light bulbAll lamps had 95 watts GLX sensorThe same GLX sensor was used to record data

6 Materials Materials: – PASPORT Xplorer GLX – 3 PASPORT Barometer pressure sensors – 3 PASPORT extension cables – Large tub of water – 6 utility clamps – 3 plastic tubing clamps – 3 plastic tubings – 3 ring stands – 1 razor blade – 3 95-watt lamps – 1 metric ruler – 1 large fan – 3 plant cuttings – Flashdrive GLX Sensor

7 Method Obtain 3 plant cuttings Jar with water

8 Method cont. Keep the clipped ends of the plant cuttings submerged in water Cut plant at 45° angle and immediately place into open end of plastic tubing

9 Method cont. Afterward, clamp plant end with plastic tubing clamp Pressurized tube with water Keep thumb over top to maintain constant pressure!

10 Method cont. Set up structure as shown in the photo (make sure to keep the barometer level with the plant cutting) Plant cutting Clamps Barometer Fan

11 Method cont. Do 3 trials with 5 levels of independent variable The distance of the fan from the plant cuttings is changed: 40 cm, 70 cm, 100 cm, 130 cm, and 160 cm from the plant cuttings For each variable, run trial for 10 minutes, letting GLX sensor measure every 10 seconds

12 Method cont. Record data, process, and analyze data

13 Results-Tables Distance of Plant Cutting from Fan (cm)Trial ATrial BTrial CAverage:Final Average: E none none Data Table #1: Average Rate of Transpiration (in mmHg/10seconds) for Different Fan Distances from the Plant Cutting for Trials A,B, and C

14 Results- Graphs Graph #1: Fan Distance From Plant Cutting (in cm. ) vs. the Average Rate of transpiration (in mmHg/10seconds)

15 Results-Photos 95 Watt Lamps Clamp Plant cuttings Fan GLX sensor

16 Conclusion Too much wind is not good for transpiration Stomata closes and causes little to no transpiration Stomata close/wind strong= sensor reads positive pressure For the plant cuttings placed 40 cm from the wind source, the plants transpired slowly or not at all The rate of transpiration, in this case, was actually positive 0.02 mmHg/10sec Plants experiencing this much wind would thus starve For the plant cuttings that were 70 cm and 100 cm from the wind source, the data recorded was not viable to reach conclusions An air bubble formed and the sensor could not measure pressure changes

17 Conclusion cont. For the 130 cm, data showed that there was a transpiration rate of mmHg/10 sec This showed that at this wind level, transpiration rates were relatively high For the 160 cm, data showed that there was a transpiration rate of mmHg/10 sec This showed that at this wind level, transpiration rates were not as high as the 130 cm rate This is because there is less wind evaporating the water on the surface of the leaf, implying lower transpiration rates Overall, stronger wind leads to more transpiration, but too much wind causes no transpiration because stomata close

18 Evaluation Some errors include: – After the 100 cm trial, it was apparent that the plant cuttings were no longer submerged in the water – The leaf cutting in the middle seemed to have more wind directed toward it because it was placed directly in front of the fan as opposed to the other two leaf cuttings which were placed toward the sides of the fan – During some of the trials, objects blocked parts of the fan (i.e. the power outlet blocked part of the fan during the 100 cm trial)

19 Thanks for Listening!


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