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Reading: Multiple Choice Thomas A. Stewart Literacy Test (OSSLT) Prep Guide 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Reading: Multiple Choice Thomas A. Stewart Literacy Test (OSSLT) Prep Guide 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reading: Multiple Choice Thomas A. Stewart Literacy Test (OSSLT) Prep Guide 2013

2 Introduction This guide is intended to be a resource for students, teachers and parents. It has several sections covering what to expect, how these questions are marked, examples of good and bad answers with explanations for why. Throughout the guide there are suggestions, tips and hints. You can jump from section to section or go through the guide in order. We recommend visiting this guide more than once. To help you navigate the guide, the TAS Logo is a link to the Table of Contents

3 Table of Contents Sample Question Types of Questions Explicit Implicit Decoding the OSSLT Making Connections Other Guides

4 Decoding the OSSLT : OSSLT-speak The OSSLT has its own special terminology. Its important to know what their terms mean. Selection: A selection is the thing they have you read…it might be part of a book, a story from a magazine, something from a website, but basically its the thing you need to base your answers on. Prompt: The prompt is basically the question. For a Series of Paragraphs Expressing an Opinion the prompt will be the topic they want you to write about. Response: Your response is your answer; what you write about the selection in answer to the prompt. Scoring: Scoring is the word they use for marking or grading. Your score on each question is called a Code. So if you get 30 they call it a Code 30. Conventions: Spelling, grammar, sentence structure and punctuation.

5 Reading: Multiple Choice A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontarios history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such luxury. In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the cars last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton. EXAMPLE: In the actual booklet there is no headline explaining the article. The Photo basically takes the place of the headline and introduces what the selection is all about. First, look at the Photo. This is an example of a reading question.

6 Reading: Multiple Choice There are three (3) different kinds of Multiple Choice Questions: 1 – Explicit – you can get the answer directly from the text. 2 – Implicit – to get the answer you will have to make an inference, that is think about what youve read and come to some conclusion – put 2 and 2 together. 3 – Making Conections – these are the hardest ones. You will have take the information from the text and draw a conclusion based on what youve learned.

7 Reading: Multiple Choice OK, weve looked at the photo (Dont they look happy? They didnt even have a Literacy test.). Now its time to read the article. BTW The OSSLT people call everything you read a selection.

8 Reading: Multiple Choice A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontarios history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such luxury. In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the cars last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton. The story will appear a paragraph at a time each time you click

9 Reading: Multiple Choice A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontarios history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such luxury. In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the cars last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton.

10 Reading: Multiple Choice In 1920, few mining and forestry settlements in Northern Ontario had schools, because the settlements lacked a roads. b money. c children. d teachers. Multiple-Choice (Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.) 1 EXAMPLE: What kind of question do you think this is? 1 Explicit ? – Can you get the answer directly from the text? 2 Implicit ? – Do you have to make an inference? Are they asking you to think about what youve read and come to a conclusion – put 2 and 2 together? 3 Making Conections? – Are you being asked to take the information from the text and draw a conclusion based on what youve learned? Click on me to return to the story

11 Reading: Multiple Choice In 1920, few mining and forestry settlements in Northern Ontario had schools, because the settlements lacked a roads. b money. c children. d teachers. Multiple-Choice (Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.) 1 EXAMPLE: Its Explicit We get the answer directly from the text. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such luxury. In 1920, few mining and forestry settlements in Northern Ontario had schools, because the settlements lacked a roads. b money. c children. d teachers. The answer is: b) money

12 Reading: Multiple Choice A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontarios history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such luxury. In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the cars last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton.

13 Reading: Multiple Choice Which of the following was not served by a rail car classroom? a forestry settlements (line 2) b few towns (line 3) c remote settlements (lines 5–6) d tiny communities (line 10) Multiple-Choice (Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.) 3 EXAMPLE: OK, now what kind of question do you think this is? 1 Explicit ? – Can you get the answer directly from the text? 2 Implicit ? – Do you have to make an inference? Are they asking you to think about what youve read and come to a conclusion – put 2 and 2 together? 3 Making Conections? – Are you being asked to take the information from the text and draw a conclusion based on what youve learned?

14 Reading: Multiple Choice Which of the following was not served by a rail car classroom? a forestry settlements (line 2) b few towns (line 3) c remote settlements (lines 5–6) d tiny communities (line 10) Multiple-Choice (Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.) 3 EXAMPLE: Again, what kind of question do you think this is? Watch the not here. Theyve made it bold to make sure you notice. Its Implicit – You have to make an inference and figure out where the school trains didnt go. They didnt go to the few towns that could afford to build real schools. Which of the following was not served by a rail car classroom? a forestry settlements (line 2) b few towns (line 3) c remote settlements (lines 5–6) d tiny communities (line 10)

15 Reading: Multiple Choice A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontarios history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such luxury. In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the cars last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton. The same sentence has provided two answers…thats not always going to be the case but, as you see, it could happen.

16 Reading: Multiple Choice What supports the idea that the experiment was a success? a Children and adults showed up. b Some towns opened their own schools. c Highways were built in Northern Ontario. d A passenger rail car was converted into a museum. Multiple-Choice (Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.) 4 EXAMPLE: This is a Making Conections Question– You are being asked to take the information from the text and draw a conclusion based on what youve learned. What is the proof that the idea to use schools on rails worked? What supports the idea that the experiment was a success? a Children and adults showed up. b Some towns opened their own schools. c Highways were built in Northern Ontario. d A passenger rail car was converted into a museum. You need to re-read the selection on questions like these. In Line 12 the article it says right out: The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by Which one of these answers backs that up? This is the only proof that makes sense and comes from the selection. The fact a rail car is now a museum is in the last line of the article.

17 Reading: Multiple Choice A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontarios history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such luxury. In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the cars last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton. Heres our first clue. We know they were a success, now all we have to do is keep reading to find something that relates to the four choices. And here it is.

18 TAS OSSLT Guides: Thomas A Stewart OSSLT Guide How the test is marked and why this matters Reading Questions: Open Response Reading Questions: Multiple Choice Writing Questions: Series of Paragraphs Overview of the OSSLT Writing Questions: Open Response Short Writing How to prepare for the OSSLT Writing Questions: News Report


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