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© May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Training Program Overview Produced by LeBlond & Associates, LLC Thanks for taking the time to view this presentation.

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Presentation on theme: "© May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Training Program Overview Produced by LeBlond & Associates, LLC Thanks for taking the time to view this presentation."— Presentation transcript:

1 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Training Program Overview Produced by LeBlond & Associates, LLC Thanks for taking the time to view this presentation –Its about ten minutes long This presentation will advance automatically until you see this symbol –which means click to advance Click on this when you are ready to proceed

2 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Design Control, Configuration Management, and Control of Engineering Margins Developed and Presented by LeBlond and Associates, LLC

3 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Contents of This Presentation (color coded by topic) Why has this course been developed? How will the course be structured? How will the presentation actually proceed? What is the current delivery schedule?

4 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Why Has This Course Been Developed? To provide students with an understanding of Design Control from: a Regulatory viewpoint –What does Design Basis really mean? a Quality Assurance viewpoint –What does Criterion III actually require? And most importantly… From an Engineering viewpoint –How do I determine the design of an SSC? Students typically struggle with these concepts –The Typical Student Questions on the next slide are indicative.

5 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Typical Student Questions What is the difference between Design Input, Design Requirements, Design Basis, Licensing Basis, and other similar terms? Is Design Control the same as 10 CFR 50, Appendix B, Criterion III? What is Configuration Management and how do I apply it? How do these processes relate to Design Control? –Corrective Action? –Operability? –Change/10 CFR 50.59? –Parts Evaluations –Temporary Alterations and Temporary Changes? Which documents do I review to determine an SSCs design? Do alterations to a calculation affect an SSCs design? and other similar questions. The actual courses slide introducing the Major Course Objectives is next.

6 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Major Course Objectives The student shall Define and Identify: 1. Design Control using terms from Regulatory Guide 1.186, 10 CFR 50.2, and industry standards. 2. The major elements of 10 CFR 50, Appendix B, Criterion III, Design Control. 3. The relationship of 10 CFR 50, Appendix B criteria to Design Control. 4. The structure and use of a Configuration Management Model. 5. The relationship of Design Control to the activities described below: Routine Modifications Corrective Action Operability Determinations UFSAR and DBD Updating Calculation Control Discrepancy Resolution Alternate Parts Replacement Engineering Margin Management 6. The use of DBNPS procedures to implement the activities described above. 7. The relationship of course learning objectives to INPOs assessment plans.

7 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC How Is This Course Structured? Four fundamental questions will be answered –Very basic summary of answers is provided here 1.What is the language of Design Control? –Critical terms, and their interrelationships, such as Design Basis, Design Requirements, Licensing Basis, UFSAR content, etc. are graphically illustrated. (Practical identification of site documents is included.) 2.What are the regulations that govern Design Control? –Design Control is controlled by 10 CFR 50 Appendix B 3.How does Configuration Management relate to Design Control? –Simple model that works in most cases 4.How is Design Control applied in practice? –Ten examples are used to illustrate common problems To see more about the methods used to illustrate these concepts, click here

8 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Use of Graphical Learning Aids Four flowcharts/graphical aids are developed as part of answering the four questions Flowcharts build upon each other to illustrate: –the variety of terms used in design control –10 CFR 50 Appendix Bs role in design control –Configuration Management –Identification and Management of Engineering Margins as part of design control

9 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Use of Ten Illustrative Examples Ten realistic examples are presented to illustrate practical application and common errors They examine the role of design control in the following processes: –Routine Modifications –Corrective Action –10 CFR –Operability Determinations –UFSAR and DBD Updating –Calculation Control –Discrepancy Resolution –Alternate Parts Replacement –Engineering Margin Management These examples continually reinforce application of: –Standardized terminology –Applicable regulations –Engineering design practices

10 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Site-Specific Customization The course is intended to be customized to either: 1.Each sites procedures or 2.Address site-specific design control problems or –Some combination of #1 and #2 1.Typical Procedure customization –Site-specific procedures are compared against the guidance, regulations, and course learning objectives –Students are led through an overview of their procedures An option is available to allow a site to conduct an procedure improvement cycle prior to incorporation into the class material 2.Typical site-specific design control problem customization –Specialized presentation is developed to illustrate sites issues –Presented at the end of class to build upon learning objectives –Treatment of Temporary Alterations, design basis reconstitution, control of calculations have been presented in the past Click here for more detail on the courses characteristics

11 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Additional Course Characteristics Two days in length –16 hours of instruction with 2 hours for review/exam –Includes time for procedure review and/or site-specific problem presentation Attendance by a wide variety of students is appropriate, but… –Intended for Response to Conditions Adverse to Quality graduates All reference material is located in a separate book –Latest industry guidance is provided Main presentation file proceeds front to back, with each slide in sequence An outline of two course segments follows Click here to view an outline of two segments of the actual presentation

12 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Illustration of Two Selected Course Segments First selected Course Segment illustrates the development of the courses Flowchart #1 Flowchart #1 graphically depicts the core terminology and their interrelationships –After development of Flowchart #1, the students classify a set of site-specific design material which includes UFSAR material and internal content Identifying Design Basis Functions versus Values Calculations Drawings Procurement specifications Etc Second Selected Course Segment places various pieces of design information onto a design margin model –Based upon Regulatory Issue –Used to illustrate management of engineering margins

13 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Terminology and Interrelationships Flowchart #1 is slowly developed over two hours of class. Each animation on the next slide represents a separate learning objective. The classification of site-specific design material occurs after the class is familiar with Flowchart #1. –This final exercise takes an additional hour –This classification involves placing drawings, figures, procurement specifications, vendor technical information, etc in their proper location on a Worksheet/Flowchart. The goals of this segment are: –Understand the various terms and their interrelationships –Classify various site-specific documents according their role within design control Click here to watch Flowchart #1 develop over a 30 second time period.

14 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Design Input Design Process Design Output Requirements Design Regulations Others Calculations Analyses Evaluations Others Specifications Drawings Lists Others Licensing Basis (Docketed material) Design Bases Design Bases Functions Design Bases Values Supporting Design Information UFSAR Descriptive information Design Bases/limits on operation Safety Analyses Click here to view a portion of the site-specific design document classification exercise.

15 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC A Portion of the Site-Specific Design Document Classification Exercise Information Description Design Control Classification Design BasisSupporting Design Information Licensing Basis Comments InputProcessOutputFunctionValue Calculations and Analyses (Tab #s 5 and 6) UFSAR Section 15A.3 and Table ( See Tab #5) Calculation # CN-CRA (See Tab #6) This portion of the worksheet distinguishes a presentation of a calculation in the UFSAR from the calculation itself.

16 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC A Portion of the Site-Specific Design Document Classification Exercise Information Description Design Control Classification Design BasisSupporting Design Information Licensing Basis Comments InputProcessOutputFunctionValue Calculations and Analyses (Tab #s 5 and 6) UFSAR Section 15A.3 and Table ( See Tab #5) X Yes Presents the calc, not the calc itself. Calculation # CN-CRA (See Tab #6) XYes No (NRC sub.?) This table is completed as a classroom discussion while remaining oriented to Flowchart #1. Click here to view the second, selected course segment.

17 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Use of a Design Margin Model A margin model is developed based upon Regulatory Issue Summary –It is an expansion of the model used in Response to Conditions Adverse to Quality The class identifies the types and sources of design information that populates each line –Identification of margin differences facilitates margin management The following slides illustrate: –the development of the model –practical application of the model by identifying key pieces of design information

18 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Installed Capability, Design Requirements, Full Qualification, and Required Functions Review Regulatory Issue Summary , Sections 3.4 and 6.3 Major Points: –Diagram describes typical design/licensing practices –Combined with previous discussions, four points have been discussed Actual installed/purchased capability in the field Design Requirements –May be the same as installed capability Full Qualification –Restoration of Full Qualification is Criterion XVI Objective Required Function under accident/design conditions –Extensively used in Operability Determinations These elements of RIS are reviewed to identify the capacity levels that dictate differing regulatory treatment. Click here to review the model.

19 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Required SSC Function during accident/design conditions Licensing Level Installed Capability ( > Design Requirements ) Full Qualification Corrective Action Objective for Criterion XVI Operability Determinations Focus on This Regime Basic Design and Licensing Practices Design Control applies throughout this chart (Including this regime) Each of the four capacity levels is repetitively played by a student to illustrate the margins. Click here to view an example that uses this model.

20 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Example #6 Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Degradation One of two Auxiliary Feedwater Pumps have exhibited reduced capacity due to wear/degradation internal to the pump. Specifically, increased clearances between pump stages have reduced pump capacity slightly. Corrective Action to overhaul the pump is scheduled for the next refueling outage. The pump has properly been declared Operable based upon the work summarized on the next slide. This example is used to: 1.Provide an exercise to categorize/place common design information on the margin model. 2.Illustrate the margin issues associated with a use-as-is corrective action. 3.Illustrate the methods available to access margin inside of calculations Click here to view the categorization exercise.

21 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Summary of Information Available for Example #6 The Chapter 15 Loss of Feedwater analysis assumes that the pumps will deliver 110 GPM to each of four steam generators for decay heat removal after any loss of Main Feedwater and to maintain RCS pressure within limits with 10% of the tubes plugged. –Current tube plugging levels are just under 5%. With the worst case discharge pressure of 1050 psig, the degraded pump can only deliver 106 GPM per generator. The analysis group has performed a sensitivity analysis that demonstrates improved results at 106 GPM/5% over the Safety Analysis level of 110 GPM/10%. The UFSAR states that the pump/motor combination is 1050 psig with a 1450psig shut-off head. The pump curve shows psig. The purchase order for the pump references a specification that called for psig -0/+5% This information is placed on the margin model as a classroom exercise.

22 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Question #1 Using the chart on the next page, fill in the critical four points for this example. Click here to see this information properly placed on the margin model.

23 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Required AFW Function during LOFW Licensing Level/Full Qualification Design Point Remove decay heat and control reactor pressure to within limits. AFW system controls pressure with psig and 10% tubes plugged. Pump is rated for psig psig -0/+5% Actual Capability psig This UFSAR information is both a specified safety function for Operability and a Design Basis Function. This UFSAR information is a Design Basis Value. This UFSAR information is design description. Keep clicking at your pace to view the rest of this slide. This information is a design requirement from a design output document. Actual installed capability Click here to proceed to Delivery Schedule

24 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC What is the current Delivery Schedule? The course materials are complete and are ready for site-specific procedure customization. It has been delivered over twenty times at four sites –Student feedback has been overwhelming positive The site-specific class can be delivered at your site within approximately seven weeks from a decision to proceed Instructional materials are also available –Lesson plan and presentation files –Course graphics may be acquired separately

25 © May, 2003 LeBlond and Associates, LLC Closure Thanks again for your interest and time For any questions or further details, contact Peter LeBlond at: – or Just click anywhere to end the show


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