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Cost-Volume-Profit Relationships Chapter 6. 6-2 LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1.Explain how changes in activity affect contribution margin. 2.Compute the contribution.

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Presentation on theme: "Cost-Volume-Profit Relationships Chapter 6. 6-2 LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1.Explain how changes in activity affect contribution margin. 2.Compute the contribution."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cost-Volume-Profit Relationships Chapter 6

2 6-2 LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1.Explain how changes in activity affect contribution margin. 2.Compute the contribution margin ratio (CM) ratio and use it to compute changes in contribution margin and net income. 3.Show the effects on contribution margin of changes in variable costs, fixed costs, selling price and volume. 4. Compute the break-even point by both the equation method and the contribution margin method. After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

3 6-3 LEARNING OBJECTIVES 5.Prepare a cost-volume-profit (CVP) graph and explain the significance of each of its components. 6. Use the CVP formulas to determine the activity level needed to achieve a desired target profit. 7. Compute the margin of safety and explain its significance. After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

4 6-4 LEARNING OBJECTIVES 8.Compute the degree of operating leverage at a particular level of sales and explain how the degree of operating leverage can be used to predict changes to net income. 9.Compute the break-even point for a multiple product company and explain the effects of shifts in the sales mix on contribution margin and the break-even point. 10. (Appendix 6A) Understand cost-volume-profit with uncertainty. After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

5 6-5 The Basics of Cost-Volume-Profit (CVP) Analysis Contribution Margin (CM) is the amount remaining from sales revenue after variable expenses have been deducted.

6 6-6 The Basics of Cost-Volume-Profit (CVP) Analysis CM is used to cover fixed expenses.

7 6-7 The Basics of Cost-Volume-Profit (CVP) Analysis After covering fixed costs, any remaining CM contributes to income.

8 6-8 The Contribution Approach For each additional unit Wind sells, $200 more in contribution margin will help to cover fixed expenses and profit.

9 6-9 The Contribution Approach Each month Wind must generate at least $80,000 in total CM to break even.

10 6-10 The Contribution Approach If Wind sells 400 units in a month, it will be operating at the break-even point.

11 6-11 The Contribution Approach If Wind sells one additional unit (401 bikes), net income will increase by $200.

12 6-12 The Contribution Approach The break-even point can be defined either as: ÊThe point where total sales revenue equals total expenses (variable and fixed). ËThe point where total contribution margin equals total fixed expenses.

13 6-13 Contribution Margin Ratio The contribution margin ratio is: For Wind Bicycle Co. the ratio is: Contribution margin Sales CM Ratio = $200 $500 = 40%

14 6-14 Contribution Margin Ratio At Wind, each $1.00 increase in sales revenue results in a total contribution margin increase of 40¢. If sales increase by $50,000, what will be the increase in total contribution margin?

15 6-15 Contribution Margin Ratio A $50,000 increase in sales revenue

16 6-16 Contribution Margin Ratio A $50,000 increase in sales revenue results in a $20,000 increase in CM or ($50,000 × 40% = $20,000)

17 6-17 Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume Wind is currently selling 500 bikes per month. The companys sales manager believes that an increase of $10,000 in the monthly advertising budget would increase bike sales to 540 units. Should we authorize the requested increase in the advertising budget?

18 6-18 Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume. Sales increased by $20,000, but net income decreased by $2,000. $80,000 + $10,000 advertising = $90,000

19 6-19 Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume The Shortcut Solution

20 6-20 APPLICATIONS OF CVP Consider the following basic data: Per unit Percent Sales Price $ Less: Variable cost Contribution margin Fixed costs total $35,000

21 6-21 APPLICATIONS Current sales are $100,000. Sales manager feels $10,000 increase in sales budget will provide $30,000 increase in sales. Should the budget be changed? Incremental CM approach: $30,000 x 40% CM ratio12,000 Additional advertising expense10,000 Increase in net income 2,000 YES

22 6-22 APPLICATIONS Management is considering increasing quality of speakers at an additional cost of $10 per speaker. Plan to sell 80 more units. Should management increase quality? Expected total CM =(480 speakers x$90) $43,200 Present total CM =(400 speakers x$100) 40,000 Increase in total contribution margin 3,200 (and net income) YES

23 6-23 APPLICATIONS Management advises that if selling price dropped $20 per speaker and advertising increased by $15,000/month, sales would increase 50%. Good idea? Expected total CM =(400x150%x$80) $48,000 Present total CM (400x$100)40,000 Incremental CM 8,000 Additional advertising cost15,000 Reduction in net income(7,000) NO

24 6-24 APPLICATIONS A plan to switch sales people from flat salary ($6,000 per month) to a sales commission of $15 per speaker could increase sales by 15%. Good idea? Expected total CM (400x115%x$85)$39,100 Current total CM (400x$100) 40,000 Decrease in total CM (900) Salaries avoided if commission paid 6,000 Increase in net income $5,100 YES

25 6-25 APPLICATIONS A wholesaler is willing to buy 150 speakers if we will give him a discount off our price. The sale will not disturb regular sales and will not change fixed costs. We want to make $3,000 on this sale. What price should we quote? Variable cost per speaker$150 Desired profit on order (3,000/150) 20 Quoted price per speaker$170

26 6-26 Break-Even Analysis Break-even analysis can be approached in two ways: Equation method Contribution margin method.

27 6-27 Equation Method Profits = Sales – (Variable expenses + Fixed expenses) Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits OR At the break-even point profits equal zero.

28 6-28 Equation Method Here is the information from Wind Bicycle Co.:

29 6-29 Equation Method We calculate the break-even point as follows: Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits $500Q = $300Q + $80,000 + $0 Where: Q = Number of bikes sold $500 = Unit sales price $300 = Unit variable expenses $80,000 = Total fixed expenses

30 6-30 Equation Method We calculate the break-even point as follows: Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits $500Q = $300Q + $80,000 + $0 $200Q = $80,000 Q = 400 bikes

31 6-31 Equation Method We can also use the following equation to compute the break-even point in sales dollars. Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits X = 0.60X + $80,000 + $0 Where: X = Total sales dollars 0.60 = Variable expenses as a percentage of sales $80,000 = Total fixed expenses

32 6-32 Equation Method We can also use the following equation to compute the break-even point in sales dollars. Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits X = 0.60X + $80,000 + $0 0.40X = $80,000 X = $200,000

33 6-33 Contribution Margin Method The contribution margin method is a variation of the equation method. Fixed expenses Unit contribution margin = Break-even point in units sold Fixed expenses CM ratio = Break-even point in total sales dollars

34 6-34 CVP Relationships in Graphic Form Viewing CVP relationships in a graph gives managers a perspective that can be obtained in no other way. Consider the following information for Wind Co.:

35 6-35 CVP Graph Fixed expenses Units Dollars Total Expenses

36 6-36 Units Dollars CVP Graph Total Sales

37 6-37 Units Dollars CVP Graph Break-even point Profit Area Loss Area

38 6-38 Target Profit Analysis Suppose Wind Co. wants to know how many bikes must be sold to earn a profit of $100,000. We can use our CVP formula to determine the sales volume needed to achieve a target net profit figure.

39 6-39 The CVP Equation Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits $500Q = $300Q + $80,000 + $100,000 $200Q = $180,000 Q = 900 bikes

40 6-40 The Contribution Margin Approach We can determine the number of bikes that must be sold to earn a profit of $100,000 using the contribution margin approach. Fixed expenses + Target profit Unit contribution margin = Units sold to attain the target profit $80,000 + $100,000 $200 = 900 bikes

41 6-41 The Margin of Safety Excess of budgeted (or actual) sales over the break-even volume of sales. The amount by which sales can drop before losses begin to be incurred. Margin of safety = Total sales - Break-even sales Lets calculate the margin of safety for Wind.

42 6-42 The Margin of Safety Wind has a break-even point of $200,000. If actual sales are $250,000, the margin of safety is $50,000 or 100 bikes.

43 6-43 The Margin of Safety The margin of safety can be expressed as 20 percent of sales. ($50,000 ÷ $250,000)

44 6-44 Operating Leverage A measure of how sensitive net income is to percentage changes in sales. With high leverage, a small percentage increase in sales can produce a much larger percentage increase in net income. Contribution margin Net income Degree of operating leverage =

45 6-45 Operating Leverage $100,000 $20,000 = 5

46 6-46 Operating Leverage With a measure of operating leverage of 5, if Wind increases its sales by 10%, net income would increase by 50%. Heres the proof!

47 6-47 Operating Leverage 10% increase in sales from $250,000 to $275, % increase in sales from $250,000 to $275, results in a 50% increase in income from $20,000 to $30, results in a 50% increase in income from $20,000 to $30,000.

48 6-48 The Concept of Sales Mix Sales mix is the relative proportions in which a companys products are sold. Different products have different selling prices, cost structures, and contribution margins. Lets assume Wind sells bikes and carts and see how we deal with break-even analysis.

49 6-49 The Concept of Sales Mix Wind Bicycle Co. provides us with the following information: $265,000 $550,000 = 48% (rounded) $170,000 $170, = $354,167 (rounded) Break-even point in sales dollars:

50 6-50 Assumptions of CVP Analysis Selling price is constant throughout the entire relevant range. Costs are linear throughout the entire relevant range. In multi-product companies, the sales mix is constant. In manufacturing companies, inventories do not change (units produced = units sold).

51 Cost-Volume-Profit with uncertainty Appendix 6A

52 6-52 CVP with uncertainty Use a decision tree to simplify calculations The decision tree is used to calculate profits under various alternatives A second decision tree can be used to calculate the probabilities of the various scenarios to further determine a reasonable estimate of profit A computer can be used to save time

53 6-53 End of Chapter 6


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