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Mirror Design. Design Brief You are being asked to design and make a small mirror which will be sold in a traditional giftware shop Specification The.

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Presentation on theme: "Mirror Design. Design Brief You are being asked to design and make a small mirror which will be sold in a traditional giftware shop Specification The."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mirror Design

2 Design Brief You are being asked to design and make a small mirror which will be sold in a traditional giftware shop Specification The mirror is to be made from pine and must incorporate metal decoration. The mirror must be made to the exact sizes using the template given The mirror must be decorated using traditional crafts

3 Mirror Design Project Research Topics Casting Tinwork Scrollwork Riveting Metals Existing Products Rendering & Sketching Techniques

4 Research task 1: Metal Casting Casting is a manufacturing process by which a liquid material is usually poured into a mould, which contains a hollow cavity of the desired shape, and then allowed to solidify.manufacturingmould The casting process is one of the oldest known with evidence of copper casting being carried out as early as 3200BC. Materials that can be cast include some metals, plastics, wax, resins, glass, clay and concrete. The mould can be made from different materials including sand, rubber, cuttlefish, graphite and plaster. In a school workshop, the most commonly casted materials are aluminium and pewter. This is because these metals melt at low temperatures making them easier to work with than metals which have high melting points.

5 Task 1: Pewter Casting Task: Using a piece of cuttlefish create a mould and cast a small piece of pewter Learn: To create a mould How to cast pewter Designing Outcome 1.2Researching the main design factors identified, using a range of appropriate techniques Materials & Manufacture 1.1 Selecting potential materials to suit manufacturing tasks based on information given in working drawings and design proposals Materials & Manufacture 1.2 Testing the suitability of selected materials in terms of workability, practicability, function and performance

6 Research task 2: Tinwork A tinsmith, also known as a whitesmith, was usually a man, who made or repaired tin items. The practice of tinsmithing, or making and repairing items of tinplate grew from the early 1600s in the UK. Common items made were cups, plates, funnels, bowls and candleholders. Tinsmiths also worked with copper which has similar properties to tin. Until early 1700s tinsmithing was carried out by hand. Young boys where trained as apprentices for 6 years before they where fully qualified. Tin is a pure metal which can be mined. Tinplate is created in a process where thin steel is dipped multiple times into molten tin, thus plating it in tin. This process prevents the items from rusting. Alloys of tin include Bronze, Pewter and Solder. Working with Tin requires few tools, a pair of tinsnips, hammer, soldering iron and an anvil.

7 Task 2: Tinwork For this task you will be using aluminium rather than tin Task: Choose one of the designs and create a punched design on your piece of aluminium Learn: How to cut and shape aluminium How to punch a pattern into aluminium Designing Outcome 1.2Researching the main design factors identified, using a range of appropriate techniques Materials & Manufacture 1.1 Selecting potential materials to suit manufacturing tasks based on information given in working drawings and design proposals Materials & Manufacture 1.2 Testing the suitability of selected materials in terms of workability, practicability, function and performance

8 Research task 3: Wrought Iron work A Blacksmith makes many kinds of tools and other objects out of metal. He heats the metal in a forge to make it soft and then hammers it on an anvil to shape it. The metals used where bronze and iron. Iron is still used today but it is usually mixed with carbon to create steel. Metal was first forged over 4000 years ago in the middle east. From the 13 th century onwards with the advancement of technology Blacksmiths where able to make weapons, armour and tools and they became Kings of trade. Their own company was formed The Worshipful Company of Blacksmiths was formed in In 1496 the blast furnace was introduced which made it possible to process larger quantities of cast iron which was turned into wrought iron. The industrial revolution in the 1700s changed the way that metal was produced which led to the decline in the number of Blacksmiths. Today wrought iron is no longer produced. There are plastic and resin materials that are available that are much stronger and cheaper to produce.

9 Task 3:- Wrought Iron work As a class a piece of steel bar will be bent into a scroll using specialist bending tools. This will be too big a scale to incorporate into the mirror design so you will use a different material - copper wire for this task Task: Using the peg jig create a decorative bent metal shape by bending the copper wire around the pegs. Learn: How metal can be bent to create scrolls Designing Outcome 1.2Researching the main design factors identified, using a range of appropriate techniques Materials & Manufacture 1.1 Selecting potential materials to suit manufacturing tasks based on information given in working drawings and design proposals Materials & Manufacture 1.2 Testing the suitability of selected materials in terms of workability, practicability, function and performance

10 Research task 4: Riveting Rivets are made to put parts together permanently just like screws. They are used on heavy metalwork such as those found in bridges, locomotives, boilers, and boat hulls. Heavier rivets are made of mild steel. Lighter rivets are made of copper, brass, aluminum, nickel, silver, and tinned galvanized steel. Mild steel is also used for small rivets. The tools used for riveting are a solid punch, riveting hammer, and rivet set. The most commonly used hammer is the ballpeen hammer. A rivet set is a small bar of steel with a hole in one end to receive the end of the rivet and a cuplike depression used in forming the head of the rivet as it is hammered down. Although riveting was developed for fastening metalwork together, rivets are now used to hold nearly every type of material together, including fabric and plastic. Because of this, several different types of rivets have been developed for affixing different materials, and some of them are not appropriate for use in sheet metal work. The type of rivet metalworkers use depends upon the fastening situation and design specifications of the project. Rivets on an Aeroplane Rivets on a Steel Bridge Rivets used on Fashion items

11 Task 4:- Riveting Task: Join two pieces of metal together using a round head rivet and countersunk rivet Learn: To use rivets to join metals To create a round head and how to countersink a rivet Designing Outcome 1.2Researching the main design factors identified, using a range of appropriate techniques Materials & Manufacture 1.1 Selecting potential materials to suit manufacturing tasks based on information given in working drawings and design proposals Materials & Manufacture 1.2 Testing the suitability of selected materials in terms of workability, practicability, function and performance

12 Research task 5: Metals Process Metallurgy is one of the oldest applied sciences. Its history can be traced back to 6000 BC. Currently there are 86 known metals. Metals account for about two thirds of all the elements and about 24% of the mass of the planet. Metals have useful properties including strength, ductility, high melting points, thermal and electrical conductivity, and toughness. From the periodic table, it can be seen that a large number of the elements are classified as being a metal. Some Common Metallic Materials Iron/Steel - Steel alloys are used for strength critical applications. Aluminum - Aluminum and its alloys are used because they are easy to form, readily available, inexpensive, and recyclable. Copper - Copper and copper alloys have a number of properties that make them useful, including high electrical and thermal conductivity, high ductility, and good corrosion resistance.

13 Task 5 Metals STEEL COPPER BRASS ALUMINIUM PEWTER Task: Research the different Metals shown on the right. Learn: The properties of different metals. The uses of different metals. How to identify different metals. Designing Outcome 1.2Researching the main design factors identified, using a range of appropriate techniques Materials & Manufacture 1.1 Selecting potential materials to suit manufacturing tasks based on information given in working drawings and design proposals Materials & Manufacture 1.2 Testing the suitability of selected materials in terms of workability, practicability, function and performance

14 Task: Use the internet to search for existing products include decorative metal pieces as well as mirrors Learn: To learn how to use the internet as a research tool To use images to assist with generating theme and design ideas Task 6:- Existing Products

15 Task 7:- Sketching & Rendering Make a feint line drawing of a wood and a metal image Task: Render the images using colour pencil and/or markers to make them look realistic. Learn: Using colour pencils and markers to make a drawn object look realistic

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17 Preparing a Research Sheet A research sheet should look; exciting, well- organised, personal, relevant & clean. Research Sheet

18 Preparing a Research Sheet Sort out all your collected images & drawings. Task: Trim images using scissors or guillotine. Think carefully about the size & shape of these images, they have to look good! Learn: To cut out neatly & accurately. To make good aesthetic decisions.

19 Research Sheet - Lay Out Task: Begin to carefully arrange the images on your sheet. e.g. your renderings could be placed together in a group. Learn: About lay-out & composition. To make good aesthetic decisions.

20 Finishing a Research Sheet Task: Using Blue-tac, lightly stick down all your images. This sounds simple, but you have to stick them in the right place & without any mess! Learn: To organise & arrange images properly. To stick down images cleanly & securely.

21 What is Ideas & Development? The Ideas & development stage is where all your thinking is done. Using your research to come up with unique & exciting ideas. All your ideas - drawings, sketches, colour samples etc. will be placed on a Development Sheet later.

22 Development Tasks During the development phase of this unit, we will be looking at these main areas Choosing a theme Initial Design Ideas – Decorative Metal Initial Design Ideas – Mirror Frame Developing & Integrating Ideas Justification for chosen idea Final Design Planning for Manufacture Evaluation

23 Development Task 1 – Choosing a Theme Task: Create your own Morphological analysis table Learn: About using the morphological analysis to help create different design ideas. Designing Outcome 1.5 Selecting and using idea generation techniques to generate a design proposal

24 Task 1 – Choosing a Theme – Morphological Analysis Person Age Location Theme Male Female Unisex Any Bedroom Livingroom Hallway Bathroom Office Kitchen Nautical Flowers Romantic Time Food Animals 1) Male Office Time 2) Female 7-12 Bedroom Animals 3) Female Bedroom Romantic 4) Male Bathroom Nautical 5) Unisex Any Kitchen Food 6) Female Hallway Flowers

25 Development Task 2 – Morphological Analysis Task: Look at each combination created in the morphological analysis exercise. Research possible theme images using the internet – collect images that may be used to develop your ideas – remember to consider the other headings (ie age the design is for) Learn: How to consider the factors that influence each combinations. How to research images using the internet

26 1) Male Office Time 2) Female 7-12 Bedroom Animals3) Female Bedroom Romantic 4) Male Bathroom Nautical5) Unisex Any Kitchen Food6) Female Hallway Flowers

27 Development Task 3– Integrating and Developing Ideas Task: Sketch 6 different design ideas using the morphological analysis suggestions you have created. Include design ideas for the decorative Consider and annotate how you would make the decorative piece using any one of the techniques you have researched. Learn: To use a theme to create design ideas for a product. To develop your sketching skills Sketching techniques Consideration of manufacturing process on the design Designing Outcome 1.6Incorporating relevant findings of research in a design proposal Designing Outcome 2.4Planning for manufacture

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29 Development Task 4 – Justifying Chosen Idea Task: Using the table given to you, answer the questions about each design ideas. The 3 ideas that score the highest will be developed further. Learn: To learn how to evaluate each idea critically to ensure the best ideas are carried forward Design Outcome 2.2 Justifying final design proposal in terms of evolution of design ideas and relevant design factors

30 Design Development Justification Designs for development Design ………………………………………….. Design ………………………………………… Design …………………………………………….. Justification table Design 1Design 2Design 3Design 4Design 5Design 6 Is the design of the Mirror Aesthetically Pleasing? Does the design of the mirror frame meet the specification? Does the design of the decorative piece suit the manufacturing process you have selected? Will the design effectively meet the Morphological Analysis criteria you created? Total

31 Development Task 5:-Your Final Design Task: Produce a rendered image of your final design using marker pens or coloured pencils Learn: How to present your final design Designing Outcome 2.3Presenting a design concept, including an updated product specification, in a form to permit manufacture

32 Development Task 6:- Planning for Manufacture Before you can make your mirror you need to plan how you are going to manufacture it. You need to consider how you are going to manufacture your mirror frame and your decorative piece. Task: Create a Sequence of Operations Learn: How to develop an idea into a manufacturable design. Materials & Manufacturing 3.1 Producing manufacturing plans which incorporate requirements for tools, equipment, materials and fixings, as well as manufacturing techniques and processes

33 Development Sheets - Lay Out Task: You need to produce 2 development sheets. The viewer needs to be able to follow the development of your designs. Learn: About lay-out & composition. To make good aesthetic decisions.

34 Development Sheet 2 Development Task 7:- Manufacture Task: Using the plans provided – manufacture your mirror frame using pine. Keep a diary of your progress as you make it taking note of any tools, machines and equipment you have used. Manufacture your decorative piece.Take note of any changes you make to the manufacturing process Learn: How to use drawings and follow simple manufacturing instructions Materials & Manufacturing 3.2 Preparing and marking materials for component parts, which are accurate and generally free from faults Materials & Manufacturing 3.3 Cutting, shaping and finishing component parts of prototype prior to assembly demonstrating precision in the safe use of tools and equipment Materials & Manufacturing 3.4 Assembling and joining component parts, resulting in a functionally sound prototype generally free from faults demonstrating skill in the safe use of tools and equipment Materials & Manufacturing 3.5 Finishing assembled prototypes with well-prepared surfaces to a high standard

35 Development Task 8:- Evaluation Task: Evaluate your manufactured mirror. Does it meet the Brief, Specification and the Morphological Analysis? Would your Mirror Frame be re-saleable? Grade your performance in this project Learn: What have you done well. What you struggled with. To set personal targets so you can improve. Materials & Manufacture 4.1 Evaluating the success of the manufacturing plan and outlining suggestions for improvement in terms of practicalities and efficiency Materials & manufacture 4.2 Evaluating the prototype and outlining suggestions for improvement in terms of craftmanship and finish Materials & Manufacture 4.3 Recommending changes in design that would improve the commercial manufacture of the prototype as a product in terms of economy, efficiency and sustainability Materials & Manufacture 4.4 Researching and recommending materials and manufacturing processes that might be used in a commercial setting to mass-produce products based on the prototype


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