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NDSTaR 2005 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit North Dakota Space Grant Consortium Pablo de León Jennie Untener Mark Williamson NASA WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.

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Presentation on theme: "NDSTaR 2005 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit North Dakota Space Grant Consortium Pablo de León Jennie Untener Mark Williamson NASA WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM."— Presentation transcript:

1 NDSTaR 2005 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit North Dakota Space Grant Consortium Pablo de León Jennie Untener Mark Williamson NASA WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM NORTH DAKOTA SPACE TRAINING AND RESEARCH 2005

2 NDSTaR 2005 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit Purpose: Develop a top-level design for a student built planetary space suit for Mars exploration. Student education and training in space life support systems Build a geographically disparate team across the state

3 NDSTaR 2005 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit Educational Objectives: Train students in life sciences, with special emphasis on human space flight to help them understand the requirements and difficulties involved with extravehicular activities (EVA) on planetary bodies using Mars as a design case Create ties with the EVA Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center and have space suit experts participating in the project and evaluating students ideas Provide extensive hands-on experience to all participating students in different areas of space suit design and manufacturing

4 NDSTaR 2005 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit Outcomes: Delivery of a finished prototype by March 2006 Design and build a space suit that accurately addresses most of the issues the EVA designers have to face to build a planetary suit for Mars Have the students taking active part in its design and construction Develop an Internet site to store all the information and share the progresses made Produce a final report

5 NDSTaR 2005 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit Project Mission Statement Mars-analogue research activities on Earth can benefit from a prototype Mars planetary suit that simulates many of the challenges future explorers will face during extra-vehicular activities on the Martian surface. Recognizing the iterative nature of planetary suit development, knowledge gained by designing, constructing, testing, and evaluating such a suit on Earth can be applied to future planetary suit development projects. To this end, the North Dakota Space Training and Research 2005 (NDSTaR2005) program will develop a Mars-analogue planetary suit that serves the needs of on-going Mars simulation activities. By developing the suit with the participation of other educational institutions in North Dakota, this project also aims to cultivate a knowledge and experience base needed for future space suit development projects. Ultimately, the fundamental guiding principle of this coordinated effort is to produce the highest quality product delivered on time and within budget.

6 Team Developed Requirements Pressurized to simulate the challenges of operating within a planetary suit. Able to don/off the suit in no greater than [10] minutes. Able to safely ascend and descend a ladder Conduct standard geological field study and construction activities with modified tools Conduct standard geological field study and construction activities. Traverse [45 deg] inclined terrain consisting of loose surface material. Able to operate a motorized rover while seated. Material selection and mechanism design suitable for a Martian dust. Able to quickly remove the helmet in an emergency. Function safely in the suit unaided for [1.5] hours

7 More Team Developed Requirements Re-supply of suit consumables in less than [5] minutes. Able to operate in the suit for [4 hours] without compromising user health. Able to accommodate a drinking bag for the user. Able to communicate to a remote station with voice and video data. Contain a telemetry system to transmit suit temperature, gas composition, humidity, and toxins measurements. Telemetry system must transmit heart rate and body temperature information. Must be able to accommodate a liquid cooling garment. Excellent helmet field of view. Suit, life support system, other components must be designed to be repairable. Suit must be delivered by [March 2006] to the "customer." Development costs of the suit must not exceed the programs budget.

8 Suit Construction Progress To Date

9 Sizing & Geometry – May/early June

10 Helmet Plug & Mold Construction June/early July

11 Hard Upper Torso (HUT) Plug Construction - July

12 HUT Plug Finishing & Mold late July/Early August

13 HUT Mold Preparation August

14 First soft joint or arm produced for pressure testing

15 Prototype Mars Planetary Suit

16 Participating Schools

17 1. Researching Mars climate/geology/etc in the equatorial region. 1. Researching Mars climate/geology/etc in the equatorial region. 2. Identification of known sites of scientific interest with the 2. Identification of known sites of scientific interest with the potential for early human landing access. potential for early human landing access. 3. Comparing/contrasting these Martian sites with potential sites 3. Comparing/contrasting these Martian sites with potential sites around DSU, paying close attention to methodology and around DSU, paying close attention to methodology and documentation of selection process, with the identifications of documentation of selection process, with the identifications of possible sites by the end of October possible sites by the end of October Becoming familiar with scientific and construction-type activities 4. Becoming familiar with scientific and construction-type activities we would like to demonstrate with the suit....(DSU may be able we would like to demonstrate with the suit....(DSU may be able to furnish the tools for the demonstration.) to furnish the tools for the demonstration.)

18 5. Possibility of demonstrating use of suit during simulated surface 5. Possibility of demonstrating use of suit during simulated surface emergency scenarios. emergency scenarios. 6. Researching and emulating NASA suit test methodologies, 6. Researching and emulating NASA suit test methodologies, perhaps in conjunction with Space Studies Department alumni. perhaps in conjunction with Space Studies Department alumni. 7. Identification of all material and resource requirements in 7. Identification of all material and resource requirements in preparation and execution of the test. preparation and execution of the test. 8. DSU will look into the possibility of acquiring simulated Martian 8. DSU will look into the possibility of acquiring simulated Martian dust, to test both components individually and the entire suit. dust, to test both components individually and the entire suit. 9. DSU will make substantial contributions in crafting the sections 9. DSU will make substantial contributions in crafting the sections of the final report dealing with Martian environment and suit of the final report dealing with Martian environment and suit evaluation. evaluation.

19 North Dakota State College of Science NDSCS will be doing the machining and prototyping of the suits metal parts as; NDSCS will be doing the machining and prototyping of the suits metal parts as; Enclosure ring Enclosure ring Gloves disconnection rings Gloves disconnection rings Boots disconnection rings Boots disconnection rings Shoulder bearings rings Shoulder bearings rings

20 Turtle Mountain is participating in the project with development of wireless system for positioning determination, voice and video transmission. Turtle Mountain is participating in the project with development of wireless system for positioning determination, voice and video transmission.

21 North Dakota State University Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at NDSU Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at NDSU and Packet Digital

22 North Dakota State Univesity Data to be Measured Body Temperature Temperature In Suit Heart Rate Respiration Rate Carbon Dioxide Level Oxygen Level Humidity

23 North Dakota State Univesity Wireless Communication to Receiver in Backpack Easily Replaceable Highly Resistant to Vibration Small and Lightweight Comfortably Worn Non-Restrictive

24 North Dakota State Univesity Sampling Rates Sampling Rates –Heart & Respiratory Rate: 1 Sample per Second –Temperature Sensors: 1 Sample per Minute –Oxygen & Carbon Dioxide: 1 Sample every 5 Seconds Weight of entire system must not exceed 2 kg Weight of entire system must not exceed 2 kg Other Requirements

25 North Dakota State Univesity

26 Location of Sensors Helmet- Helmet- Carbon Dioxide (2) Carbon Dioxide (2) Oxygen (2) Oxygen (2) Bodysuit- Bodysuit- –Around Chest Heart Rate Heart Rate Respiratory Rate Respiratory Rate Body Temperature (2) Body Temperature (2) –Other Temperature in Suit Temperature in Suit Humidity Humidity

27 North Dakota State Univesity Reduce the 1 Minute Response Time in the Carbon Dioxide Sensors Reduce the 1 Minute Response Time in the Carbon Dioxide Sensors Convert Sensors to Wireless Using Bluetooth Technologies Convert Sensors to Wireless Using Bluetooth Technologies Design Data Collection System Located in Astronauts Backpack Design Data Collection System Located in Astronauts Backpack Design Data Transmitter from Backpack to a Base Station Design Data Transmitter from Backpack to a Base Station Our Job

28 Benefits of the Project Educational Objectives Train students in life sciences, with special emphasis on human space flight to help them understand the requirements and difficulties involved with extravehicular activities (EVA) in planetary bodies using Mars as design case Train students in life sciences, with special emphasis on human space flight to help them understand the requirements and difficulties involved with extravehicular activities (EVA) in planetary bodies using Mars as design case Create ties with the EVA Office at the Johnson Space Center and have NASA space suit experts participating in the project and evaluating students ideas Create ties with the EVA Office at the Johnson Space Center and have NASA space suit experts participating in the project and evaluating students ideas Provide extensive hands-on experience to all participating students in different areas of space suit design and manufacturing Provide extensive hands-on experience to all participating students in different areas of space suit design and manufacturing

29 Benefits of the Project Educational Objectives Cont; A chance to work and build connections with other students and colleges/universities across the state. A chance to work and build connections with other students and colleges/universities across the state. Utilize in the design of the suit the information provided by the last U.S. robotic missions to Mars giving the student an important background on the planets morphology, atmosphere, climate and composition. Utilize in the design of the suit the information provided by the last U.S. robotic missions to Mars giving the student an important background on the planets morphology, atmosphere, climate and composition. Team Emphasis on Trades Team Emphasis on Trades –Trade Drivers Utilizing the maximum possible technology (materials and processes) Utilizing the maximum possible technology (materials and processes) –Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) Interaction with Industry and Experts Interaction with Industry and Experts –Hamilton Sundstrand, manufacturer of the NASA Space Suit –Gary L. Harris, space suit specialist, project consultant

30 CONCLUSIONS The project fulfills the new NASA Vision encouraging the students to think about planetary exploration in their lifetime Provides extensive hands-on experience otherwise unavailable in the particular subject of human space flight Increases the interest of North Dakota students in the new Vision for Space Exploration providing them an unique knowledge in a highly needed area, where is a lack of specialists Since the final result of the project is to complete a prototype of a Mars space suit, the students will show more interest and commitment to the project than if the final result was a final report

31 Questions?


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