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Dr. Barbara L. Branch Director, GATE/Extended Learning Nancy Craig, M.S. Curriculum Training Specialist Sacramento City Unified School District Fitting.

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Presentation on theme: "Dr. Barbara L. Branch Director, GATE/Extended Learning Nancy Craig, M.S. Curriculum Training Specialist Sacramento City Unified School District Fitting."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dr. Barbara L. Branch Director, GATE/Extended Learning Nancy Craig, M.S. Curriculum Training Specialist Sacramento City Unified School District Fitting Square Pegs in Round Holes Gifted Kids Dont Always Fit

2 Dr. Barbara Branch GATE Teacher - 10 yrs. Principal of a school with GATE Program – 5 yrs Director of the GATE Program – Sac City – 7 yrs Consultant – 5 yrs Author Chairman – Capital Region GATE Consortium – 7 yrs Educator Rep to the California Association for the Gifted State Board from the Capital Region -8 yrs Passionate about the gifted – 30 yrs.

3 Who are the Gifted?

4 8 Gripes of Gifted Students 1.No one explains what being gifted is all about - it's keep a big secret. 2.School is too easy and not challenging 3.Parents, teachers, and friends expect us to be perfect all the time. 4.Friends who really understand us are few and far between. When Gifted Kids don't have all the answers, by Jim Delisle & Judy Galbraith

5 8 Gripes of Gifted Students 5.Kids often tease us about being smart. 6.We feel overwhelmed by the number of things we can do in life. 7.We feel different and alienated. 8.We worry about world problems and feel helpless to do anything about them. When Gifted Kids don't have all the answers, by Jim Delisle & Judy Galbraith

6 Bummer of a birthmark, Hal… Differing from the norm can have disadvantages…

7 Social and Emotional Needs Asynchrony Perfectionism Sensitivity and Intensity Multi-potentiality

8 Asynchrony Uneven development Cognitive abilities surpass motor or emotional development Seeks friends who are older Relates well to adults

9 Asynchrony Gifted students are asynchronous. Their chronological age, social, physical, emotional, and intellectual development may all be at different levels. For example, a 5-year-old may be able to read and comprehend a third-grade book but may not be able to write legibly.

10 Perfectionism High expectations of self and others Sometimes leads to limited risk-taking May lead to low self-worth Highly self-critical

11 Healthy Perfectionism vs. Dysfunctional Perfectionism Healthy Reflective organism High personal standards Agreeable Extroverted Conscientious An Empirical Typology of Perfectionism in Academically Talented Children, Parker 1997

12 Healthy Perfectionism vs.. Dysfunctional Perfectionism Dysfunctional Excessive concern about mistakes, doubts, or parental criticism Anxious Disagreeable Doubts about actions An Empirical Typology of Perfectionism in Academically Talented Children, Parker 1997

13 Healthy Goal Setting The pursuit of excellence by individuals who enjoy setting and attaining high standards is not perfectionism.

14 What Parents Can Do Help your child to Keep striving when first attempts are unsuccessful. Dont quit when the going gets rough Dont punish yourself for failing. Hold onto your ideas and believe in your ability to reach them. Recognize that there are good parts and bad parts to perfectionism. Perfectionism, Carole C. Peters

15 Intensity Emotional intensity in the gifted is not a matter of feeling more than other people, but a different way of experiencing the world: vivid, absorbing, penetrating, encompassing, complex, commanding - a way of being quiveringly alive.

16 Gifted Kids and Brain Activity

17 MRI Research Brains on Fire Bright red blazes of high metabolic activity burst out all over the scan. Each red patch represents millions of microcombustion events in which glucose is metabolized to provide fuel for the working brain. Gifted brains are remarkably intense and diffuse metabolizers. Gifted thinkers are rarely one-mode thinkers. Gifted brains are essentially "hyper-sensitive

18 MRI Research Brains on Fire Enhanced Sensory Awareness / Sensitivity Enhanced Memory Efficiency and Capacity More Efficient Organizational-Analytic Capacity More Extensive Associational-Synthetic Capacity Greater Potential for Creative-Corporate Thinking

19 Neurological characteristics carry a number of potential drawbacks sensory, emotional, and memory overload, sensory hypersensitivities, personal disorganization, sensory distractibility, delayed processing due to "analysis paralysis" (or getting "lost in thought" due to an excess of options) mental fatigue MRI Research Brains on Fire

20 What Parents Can Do Accept children's' emotions: Exercise appropriate discipline as this helps develop a sense of security Discuss feelings openly

21 What Parents Can Do Take time to listen to children's ideas, opinions and feelings. Appreciate their sensitivities, intensities and passions. Remember that they are children first and gifted second.

22 Reassure them when they are afraid and help them to find ways of expressing their intense emotions Realize that they become frustrated when their physical capabilities do not match their intellectual abilities Honor emotions in boys as well as girls. What Parents Can Do

23 Realize that sensitivity does not mean weakness. Find like-minded peers for them to prevent social isolation. Provide professional counseling where appropriate; it is important both to support healthy emotional development and to prevent social and emotional problems. What Parents Can Do

24 Multi-Potentiality Gifted students often have a wide variety of interests, and they may miss opportunities by focusing too early on one academic area. Gifted students have trouble deciding on a career.

25 What Parents Can Do Encourage your child to explore all of the possibilities for his or her talents. Find mentors for your child in the areas of their passion.

26 What Parents Can Do Help your child with decision-making skills. Help your child prepare for college (6-8 grade)

27 What Kids want you to know Come into my bedroom at night, tuck me in and sing me a song. Also tell me stories about when you were little. Give me hugs and kisses and sit and talk with me privately. Spend quality time just with me, not with my brothers and sisters around.

28 What Kids want you to know Give me nutritious food so I can grow up healthy. At dinner talk about what we could do together on the weekend. At night talk to me about anything; love, school, family etc.

29 What Kids want you to know Let me play outside a lot. Cuddle under a blanket and watch our favorite TV show together. Discipline me. It makes me feel like you care. Leave special messages in my desk or lunch bag.

30 Summary Social and Emotional Needs Asynchrony Perfectionism Sensitivity and Intensity Multi-potentiality

31 Make Yourself Aware Educate yourself about the needs of your gifted child.

32 Make Yourself Aware Available at Amazon Read on your Kindle

33


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