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1 Herbal First Aid Charles Garcia. 2 Why Herbs… Especially when there are perfectly good prescription medicines available You forgot your first aid kit.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Herbal First Aid Charles Garcia. 2 Why Herbs… Especially when there are perfectly good prescription medicines available You forgot your first aid kit."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Herbal First Aid Charles Garcia

2 2 Why Herbs… Especially when there are perfectly good prescription medicines available You forgot your first aid kit or forgot to restock it. Your doc wouldnt prescribe the good stuff. Bear or the River got your pack. You dont have the right meds for the ailment.

3 3 Definitions Tea – pour hot water on herb/root and allow to steep. Decoction – boil herb for minutes. Wash – external application of tea or decoction. Poultice – external application of mashed roots or herbs.

4 4 Blackberry

5 5 Ubiquitous throughout the US and Canada at lower elevations. Controls diarrhea. Parts used: Leaves. Prepared as a tea: Simmer the leaves minutes Drink two or three cups Repeat as needed

6 6 Fennel

7 7 Semi-desert areas, lower mountain elevations, valleys, empty lots. Used for stomach distress, stomach spasms, urinary tract inflammation, eye wash. Use the leaves and seeds. Prepare leaves and/or seeds as a decoction: Simmer or boil briefly one teaspoon of seeds and/or greenest part of stalk and some leaves for cup of water. Drink one or two cups in sips.

8 8 Yarrow

9 9 Found throughout the U.S. at lower elevations. Parts used: Leaves and blossoms. For wounds: Crush blossoms and leaves, apply as poultice. As tea or decoction for fever. Simmer one teaspoon of fresh blossom/leaves for ten minutes in a cup of water.

10 10 California Poppy

11 11 California Poppy Originally found throughout California lowlands. Used as a painkiller and sedative. Use entire plant as a tea or decoction. Use a piece of the root directly on a toothache.

12 12 Usnea

13 13 Mountain Men…

14 14 Usnea Found throughout the United States. Natures penicillin. Used for Infections. The entire plant can be used. As a poultice or dusting. Apply to wound. As a tea for bladder conditions. Simmer a handful of the plant in a pot of water for 15 minutes. Drink decoction continually. Do not continue your trip until symptoms subside.

15 15 Plantain

16 16 Plantain Found from NYC to Mt. Whitney. Used for skin sores, insect bites and wounds. Part used: the leaves. Use by crushing the leaf and applying as poultice.

17 17 Chamomile

18 18 Chamomile Found in fields, meadows, sidewalks. Used as an antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory and gentle calmative. Use the entire above ground portion of the plant. Prepare as a tea, decoction, wash and poultice.

19 19 White Sage

20 20 White Sage Geographical limit of White Sage is unknown. Found from Midwest to Mexico to California and Washington. Leaves and stems are antibiotic, antiviral. As tea and a steam for bronchial ailments and fevers. Poultice for wounds.

21 21 Mullein

22 22 Mullein Found from Maine to Santa Monica, fields, waste areas, burned-out forests. Part used: Leaves. Used for coughs, bronchial distress, antispasmodic. Use as a tea or decoction. Strain well. Also use as a poultice for skin irritations

23 23 Cow Parsnip

24 24 Cow Parsnip Found from Labrador to California in moist lowlands. Part used: Root. Mashed and boiled for 30 seconds. Used externally for contusions, strains, sprains or other closed trauma. Also use as a poultice for skin irritations.

25 25 Stinging Nettle

26 26 Stinging Nettle Found throughout the US in moist, lowland areas. Nettles (fine hairs on stalk and leaves) contain formic acid. Causes an extreme burning sensation for the first hour and dull pain for the next 24. When boiled or steamed, its a tasty, edible green Rich in vitamins A, C, and K. Also promotes the absorption of iron (used in HIV support).

27 27 Hemlock

28 28 Hemlock Found throughout North America. Prefers riparian areas. All species are poisonous. All parts (leaf, stalk, and root) are poisonous. Hemlock stalks often have purple spots, the root has hollow chambers. WARNING: The immature root is almost identical to wild carrot.

29 29 Poison Oak/Poison Ivy

30 30 Poison Oak/Poison Ivy Found at lower elevations throughout the U.S. Causes severe itching and raised sores. All parts contains urushiol. The whole damn plant is toxic. Leaves of 3, let it be…Has NO thorns!

31 31 Jewelweed

32 32 Jewelweed Found in wetlands, meadows, stream banks. Use juice of the leaves and stems. Used for Poison Oak, Poison Ivy, insect bites, minor burns, eczema. Rub on affected areas. Carry a bar of Jewelweed soap.

33 33 Charcoal, Honey, Cinnamon Charcoal (not briquettes!) for food poisoning. Honey as antiseptic covering for wounds and burns. Cinnamon (hard stick) for spasmodic stomach, antifungal, yeast infections.


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