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Determining the Potential of a Site. - a guide to the R-Codes, to Local Authorities, and to the Development Approval Process Determining the Potential.

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Presentation on theme: "Determining the Potential of a Site. - a guide to the R-Codes, to Local Authorities, and to the Development Approval Process Determining the Potential."— Presentation transcript:

1 Determining the Potential of a Site

2 - a guide to the R-Codes, to Local Authorities, and to the Development Approval Process Determining the Potential of a Site

3 - how to use the R-codes Zones, Density, Setbacks and Plot Ratios

4 - what are the R-codes?

5

6 The purpose of the R-Codes is to provide a comprehensive basis for the control, through local government, of residential development throughout Western Australia. - what are the R-codes?

7 The purpose of the R-Codes is to provide a comprehensive basis for the control, through local government, of residential development throughout Western Australia. or The R-codes tell you what you can and cant do on any particular residential site - what are the R-codes?

8 The purpose of the R-Codes is to provide a comprehensive basis for the control, through local government, of residential development throughout Western Australia. or The R-codes tell you what you can and cant do on any particular residential site Click on Residential Design Codes - what are the R-codes?

9 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts - R-codes

10 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices - R-codes

11 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices + Tables - R-codes

12 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices + Tables + Figures - R-codes

13 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices + Tables + Figures The first five parts explain the Approvals process – they do not help you asses the potential of a site - R-codes

14 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices + Tables + Figures The first five parts explain the Approvals process – they do not help you asses the potential of a site The next part deals with design elements – overlooking, overshadowing etc - R-codes

15 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices + Tables + Figures The first five parts explain the Approvals process – they do not help you asses the potential of a site The next part deals with design elements – overlooking, overshadowing etc The final part deals with special provisions which you will almost never need ( for aged care or multiple dwellings/apartments etc) - R-codes

16 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices + Tables + Figures The first five parts explain the Approvals process – they do not help you asses the potential of a site The next part deals with design elements – overlooking, overshadowing etc The final part deals with special provisions which you will almost never need ( for aged care or multiple dwellings/apartments etc) The Appendices are examples of forms, also no help in assessing a site. - R-codes

17 The R-Codes are broken into 7 parts + Appendices + Tables + Figures The first five parts explain the Approvals process – they do not help you asses the potential of a site The next part deals with design elements – overlooking, overshadowing etc The final part deals with special provisions which you will almost never need ( for aged care or multiple dwellings/apartments etc) The Appendices are examples of forms, also no help in assessing a site. Then there are the tables and figures – these form possibly the most important part of the Codes when assessing a site and will quickly help you determine its potential - R-codes

18 Table 1 Zoning All Residential Sites are zoned. The zoning determines how many dwelling each site can have (minimum site area) It also determines minimum Outdoor living Open Space Street Setback Rear and Secondary Street setback - R-codesTables

19 Table 1 Zoning All Residential Sites are zoned. The zoning determines how many dwelling each site can have (minimum site area) It also determines minimum Outdoor living Open Space Street Setback Rear and Secondary Street setback Any Estate Agent should be able to inform you the zoning of the site they are selling If not a quick call to the local council or shire or a visit to the planning section of the website should give the zoning - R-codesTables

20 Table 1 Zoning All Residential Sites are zoned. The zoning determines how many dwelling each site can have (minimum site area) It also determines minimum Outdoor living Open Space Street Setback Rear and Secondary Street setback Any Estate Agent should be able to inform you the zoning of the site they are selling If not a quick call to the local council or shire or a visit to the planning section of the website should give the zoning Once you have the zoning Table 1 will help you determine ALL of the above - R-codesTables

21 Tables 2 & 3 Determine: Side / Boundary Setbacks Walls with no major Openings Walls with major Openings Building Heights (1 storey / 2Storey etc) Should also note here that there are more onerous requirements for setbacks of windows in: Upper floor balconies (7.5m – 15m in Subiaco) Upper floor living Rooms ( 6m) Upper Floor Bedrooms and Studies (4.5m) - R-codesTables

22 These tables explain in Graphic Terms exactly how the items in Tables 1 to 3 are applied to a building on a site They do not provide any additional information or restriction on what you can doo on site and should only be read in conjunction with the tables - R-codesFigures

23 Before you get bored looking at tables! This was an R80 site From Table 1 we could determine we needed A minimum site area of 160 m2 45 % open space 16m 2 of Outdoor Living 4m street setback......BUT Because the buildings on either side were built with a zero setback to the road, we could do the same. In fact that is a big lesson – PRECEDENCE If there are several buildings on the same street that do something that appears against the codes, but would help you develop a site to a higher potential, you can use the rule of precedence. Whilst that is an excellent indicator – you will still need to discuss this with your local authority. - R-codesAn Example

24 This small extension changed this home from a 3 bed 1 bath home into a four bed 2 bath home, with automatic lock up parking. We were able to build in the front setback because of precedence and maximise the potential of the site. It was a low cost extension, as it was on ground and involved very little change to the existing building. In that way we werent rebuilding what was already there. The aim of this extension was not to increase value but it did by well over twice the costs of the work. - R-codesAn Example

25 All Local Authorities are bound by the R-Codes, so the R-codes remain the first stop for determining the potential of a site... however each local Authority ( Council, Shire, City etc) will have its own Town planning scheme. In addition they may also have Design Codes, Precinct Plans, Heritage Standards, and a host of other planning policies particular to that council. Once you have established potential using the R-Codes as your guide, your next step is to consult the local authority and determine any further restrictions on the site. This can often be done on the web, or alternatively you can call a planning officer. - Local Authorities

26 Once you have determined which site you wish to develop – have ascertained the potential according to the R-Codes and either consulted council planners or their website, you can go ahead and prepare plans for your renovation. You MUST prepare plans There are two stages you must go through before building, you must get Development Approval Building License These can be lodge concurrently or separately – If it is fairly straightforward and completely internal – lodging at the same time is probably expedient and wise If it concerns external works and any items that may be subjective ( overlooking, reduced setbacks) it is best to lodge each stage individually. - The Development Application Process

27 If you have a more difficult application or simply want some assurance that the process will run smoothly then a Pre Lodgement meeting (before lodging DA) is appropriate. This is done once you have your plans to a level where the council officers can discuss all the elements of the planning codes. You will most likely discuss Building Height Bulk and Scale Overlooking and Overshadowing Setbacks Vehicle Access Streetscape Heritage issues ++ Your plans will need to be sufficiently resolved to show all this or at least indicate what the impact of the renovation may be - Pre Lodgement Meeting ( or Pre DA )

28 Plans should include Elevations Site Plans Floor plans ( may be combined with site plan) Possibly a 3D image (if it helps!) A Final DA set of plans will include Site Plan Floor Plans Overlooking / Overshadowing diagrams All Elevations Section Optional Streetview (required by many councils) - Pre Lodgement Meeting ( or Pre DA )

29 After you have lodged Described in Parts 1-5 of the R-Codes May include Neighbour Consultation / Advertising Should (hopefully) result in Development Approval After which you can complete working drawings. Any Structural work will need to be drawn and signed off by a practising structural Engineer The design must comply with the Building Code of Australia or BCA (this is not part of the DA process) - The DA Process

30 - Questions? Presenter:Matthew Young Copraxis Architects Contact:T: F: W:www.co-praxis.com


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