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1 Click here to begin the presentation…
Intro Navigation Use the arrows at the top to move forward or back one slide OR Click on the dates listed in the timeline below More Information Occasionally, an image will be linked to more information Click on the image to see the slide with additional information; click anywhere on the additional information slide to return Forty-six students showed up when the college opened (from The Standard, August 2009). Classes started on October 4. HYPERLINK to cadets in military training slide Land grant college, meaning that it is required to teach “practical” topics as well as offer military training. Click here to begin the presentation… Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

2 1876 October 2. Official opening of the college to students.
Forty-six students showed up when the college opened (from The Standard, August 2009). Classes started on October 4. HYPERLINK to cadets in military training slide Land grant college, meaning that it is required to teach “practical” topics as well as offer military training. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

3 1883 Railroad builds first depot at college and begins to make regular stops. The college was MILES away from civilization. Bryan was 5 or more miles away. The students came from all over the state by train. The train engineer would stop to let the students out at what became known as the “college” station. Hence, the name of the town. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

4 1890 July 1. Appointment of Lawrence Sullivan Ross as President, effective January 20, 1891, when his term as governor ended. Governor Ross was selected as President of the college when he was still governor. He came to be beloved by the student body. They would often stop at this office for advice or to talk. But he never wanted anything from him. The story goes that the most he would accept is a penny. Today’s students still leave him pennies. You’ll find them at the base of his statue (Sully) in front of the Academic Building; the students leave them for “good luck” on their tests. Sully is also attributed with earning the name “Fightin’ Texas Aggie” when he went to the state legislature to fight the cause of the young A&M College of Texas. It was probably his efforts that first launched the college on its future course of expansion and leadership in the state; his efforts also kept the legislature from collapsing it into the newer college headquartered in Austin. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

5 1894 October 20. First A&M football game (vs. Texas in Austin).
Texas Aggie Band organized by Joseph Holick. E.C. Jonas ’94 designed first Class Ring to feature some of the symbols used on current Aggie Ring. First football game – against Texas in Austin First Aggie Bank organized. 13 cadets with Joseph Holick as the bandmaster. First class ring featuring some of the icons still used on the Aggie Ring. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

6 1898 Death of President Ross. First use of Silver Taps.
The beloved President Lawrence Sullivan Ross died. This was the first use of Silver Taps on campus. Silver taps is a ceremony honoring any TAMU student who dies while enrolled at the university. Students gather in silence in front of the Academic Building on the appointed night (2nd Tuesday of each month, when necessary). Lights all over campus are blacked out. Honor is given by buglers playing a special rendition of taps – to the north, the south, and the west. Originally, that was the direction where the student dorms were located. In modern times, it is said that taps are not played to the east because the sun will never rise for that Aggie again. Ross volunteers give a 21-gun salute. Everyone leaves in silence. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

7 1909 Earliest known Aggie Bonfire is built.
The first bonfires were piles of rubble. They evolved into the “wedding cake” structures many are more familiar with. The bonfire was built as a symbol of the burning desire to beat the hell outta t.u. and burned just before the annual football game against t.u. The bonfire of 1999 collapsed before it was completed, killing 11 students and one former student. The bonfire on campus has been discontinued since then. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

8 1922 January 2. E. King Gill ’24 stepped forward and A&M’s Twelfth Man tradition was born as A&M’s football team defeats Centre College, 22-14, in the Dixie Classic at Dallas. In Dallas on January 2nd, 1922, A&M played defending national champion, Center College, in the first post-season game in the southwest. In this hard fought game, which produced national publicity, an underdog Aggie team was slowly but surely whipping a team which boasted having three All Americans. Unfortunately, the first half produced so many injuries for A&M that Coach D. X. Bible feared he wouldn’t have enough men to finish the game. At that moment, he called into the Aggie section of the stands for E. King Gill, a reserve who had left football after the regular season to play basketball. Gill, who was spotting players and was not in football uniform, willingly volunteered. Although he did not play in the game, his readiness to play symbolized the willingness of the Aggie fans to support their team to the point of actually entering the game. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

9 1930 The Gig ‘em thumb signal is begun at a yell practice by Pinky Downs ’06. It comes from the motion needed to “gig” frogs; gig ‘em began when the Aggies were playing against the TCU Horned Frogs.

10 1931 Reveille I is brought to campus and becomes the first mascot.
The first Reveille was an injured mutt that some Aggie band members picked up on the side of the road and nursed back to health. She quickly became a beloved mascot of the student body and was allowed to stay in the dorms. She was named Reveille because of her barking at the sound of reveille, the military bugle call sounded to begin the day. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

11 1942 April 21. Muster held by 25 Aggies during the Japanese siege of the Philippine island of Corregidor provided inspiration for world- wide Aggie Muster program held each year to observe anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto and to commemorate deceased Aggies. Begun in 1903, Muster is a long-standing tradition at Texas A&M, celebrated each year on April 21st an the anniversary of the battle of San Jacinto. Aggies gather together wherever they are to remember their days at Aggieland and to honor the Aggies who died in the previous year. The largest Muster held each year is the one in College Station; the photo above was taken at Reed Arena. Muster gained international recognition in 1942 when General George Moore ’08 led a muster with twenty-five men during a siege by the Japanese on the Philippine island of Corregidor during WWII. Muster is now held by Aggies everywhere, in more than four-hundred places around the world. Muster 2006, Reed Arena Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

12 1951 April 21. Dedication of Memorial Student Center during Aggie Muster ceremonies. The living room of Aggieland, the Memorial Student Center, was dedicated in conjunction with Aggie Muster ceremonies in Usually the center of student-led activities, the MSC – as it is commonly called – is home to student activity offices as well as a post office, a bookstore, bowling alley, food court, cafeteria, and lounge areas. The MSC and its grounds are dedicated to Aggies who lost their lives during the World Wars. As a living memorial, please remove your hats when entering the building and refrain from walking on the grass. The MSC closed for major renovations in August 2009 and is expected to re-open before classes in the Fall of 2012. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

13 1954 Fish Camp program for incoming freshman initiated by YMCA Director J. Gordon Gay Fish camp is a four-day orientation meant to teach incoming freshman about Texas A&M, its history and traditions, and to meet other Aggies. Fish camp counselors are Aggie upperclassmen who can share their personal experiences and offer advice about classes and life at A&M. Several sessions of fish camp are help each fall just before classes begin. Fish Camp 2008 Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

14 1959 July 1. J. Earl Rudder ’32 appointed President.
James Earl Rudder graduated from Texas A&M University in 1932 and was commissioned in the U.S. Army Reserves. In 1941, he was called to active duty and by the summer of 1943 he organized the 2nd Ranger Battalion. His Rangers landed on the shore of Normandy of June 6, 1944, as part of the Allied invasion of Europe. The battalion’s mission was to scale the 100-foot cliff of Pointe du Hoc, France. They did so completing their mission with over 50% casualties. Rudder, leading the assault himself, was wounded twice. After becoming President of the A&M College of Texas, his position was combined with that of the Chancellor of the System (Sep. 1, 1965) He served as both President of the university and the system until his death in 1970. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

15 1963 A&M Board of Directors permits women to enroll on a limited basis. African American students begin enrolling at Texas A&M University. August 23. A&M College of Texas name changed to Texas A&M University by the 58th Texas Legislature. In the face of much opposition, President Rudder made some tough decisions, which changed the direction and face of A&M forever. During his tenure as President, the A&M College of Texas was renamed Texas A&M University. Women and African American students were allowed to enroll at Texas A&M. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

16 1965 April 24. A&M System Board of Directors adopts Army/Air Force recommendations and makes the Cadet Corps membership optional. Although not popular with many former students, the elimination of the military requirement along with the admission of women and African American students allowed Texas A&M University to grow into the first-class university it has now become. The Corps of Cadets now makes up a small fraction of the student body. Even so, they make up the largest uniformed body on any campus in America. The Corps of Cadets produces officers commissioned in each of the four services: Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines. They are known as the Keepers of the Spirit. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

17 1974 Women admitted as members of Texas A&M Corps of Cadets.
Women’s athletic program established. Photo courtesy of the Cushing Library

18 1983 Texas A&M Student Government creates “The Big Event,” an annual one-day student service project benefiting the A&M community that has continued for two decades. It is the largest of its kind in the nation. Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

19 1994 March 3. The Texas A&M University web site — — officially goes online. Woohoo! Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

20 1997 September 1. The George Bush School of Government and Public Service opens. George Bush, #41, has a strong presence on this campus. He can often be found attending ceremonies and events on campus. His museum and library are home to many functions and host a variety of speakers. Keep your eyes and ears open for these events and make plans to attend yourself. You are likely to see former President Bush, and his wife, as they mingle with the crowds afterwards. Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

21 1998 The first Maroon Out is credited with helping achieve a victory over then-ranked #2 Nebraska. The first Maroon Out was indeed a huge victory for the Aggies. After all, how can you ignore 80,000 screaming fans all wearing maroon? Every year since then, a game has been designated as Maroon Out. T-shirts for each game are available for sale throughout the fall. At $5 each, they are a great deal and an easy way to show your Aggie spirit. Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

22 1999 Vision 2020 Task Force unveils recommendations aimed at placing Texas A&M University among the nation’s Top 10 public academic institutions by the year 2020. November 18. Bonfire stack collapses. Eleven students and one former student die and 27 students are injured. Vision 2020 is the university’s plan to see that we are among the top universities in the nation by the year The mission and vision of every college, division, and department at A&M should point to accomplishing that goal. 1999 was also the year of the Bonfire collapse.

23 2001 September 22. Red, White and Blue Out. Just 11 days after the terrorist attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, the three decks of Kyle Field were turned the colors of the American Flag. Only days after the attacks on our U.S. homeland, Aggies organized Red, White and Blue Out. Kyle Field was transformed into a sea of red, white and blue as everyone at the game donned shirts designated by color for the section where they were seated. Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

24 2004 November 18. Dedication of the Aggie Bonfire Memorial.
Five years after the collapse of the Bonfire in 1999, the Bonfire Memorial was dedicated at site of the Bonfire collapse. Composed of a ring of 12 rectangular “portals,” each portal represents one of the students that was killed. Each portal has a lengthy description of the student memorialized; each portal faces the direction of the student’s hometown. It is always open for public viewing near the main entrance from Texas Avenue, in the lawn to the east of the Jack Williams Administration Building. Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

25 More Info Example This is an example of a slide with additional information. Click anywhere on this slide to return to the presentation. Established as a land-grant institution, military training was a large part of the student’s training while attending the A&M College of Texas. Many of the traditions that Aggies hold so dear today began with the young cadets who, for almost 90 years, studied here at an all-male, all-military school.

26 Corps of Cadets As a land-grant institution, the mission included military training in addition to the agricultural and mechanical arts Spring of over 100 cadets form two companies of the Corps the Scott Volunteers, predecessor to the Ross Volunteers, is organized as a precision drill team Until Texas A&M was an all-male, all-military school Established as a land-grant institution, military training was a large part of the student’s training while attending the A&M College of Texas. Many of the traditions that Aggies hold so dear today began with the young cadets who, for almost 90 years, studied here at an all-male, all-military school. Photo courtesy of the Marketing & Communications

27 Military Service Self-service and service to country have long been a part of life for Aggies. After all, military training was a part of campus life from the beginning. The Corps of Cadets commissions more officers into the armed forces than any other institution other than the service academies. Texas A&M has produced over 250 flag officers (generals and admirals) over the years. Aggies have served in every conflict in which the U.S. has been involved from the Spanish-American War through present. Photos courtesy of the Association of Former Students

28 WWI and WWII WWI WWII 2,217 Aggies served 53 died
Amazing statistics. And war heroes abound, such as General Rudder. But most especially, …. (go to next slide) More Aggies served in WWII than any other school, including the combined totals of the United States Military Academy and the United States Naval Academy. Photo courtesy of the Association of Former Students

29 Medal of Honor Seven Aggies were awarded the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor: Lt. Lloyd Hughes '43 Lt. Thomas Fowler '43 Sgt. George Keathley '37 Lt. Turney Leonard '42 Lt. Eli Whiteley '41 (pictured) Sgt. William Harrell '43 Maj. Horace Carswell '38 5 awarded posthumously (The photo is of [now Captain] Whiteley with General Eisenhower.) Note that 5 awards were given posthumously. Aggies are still serving and sacrificing their lives today. In every branch of the service. “G.I. Jobs” magazine named TAMU a “Military Friendly School” for The publisher noted that only the top 15 percent of institutions of higher learning are awarded this honor. Photo courtesy of the Association of Former Students

30 Women in the Corps In the Fall of 1974, the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets became the first ROTC program in the country to admit women to its ranks, even ahead of the service academies. 1985 Women were admitted to the Aggie Band, making the Band the first gender integrated unit in the Corps. First female drum major. First female Deputy Corps Commander, the second highest ranking cadet in the Corps. Currently Women make up 14% of the Corps of Cadets Women hold leadership positions in all levels of the Corps, including Deputy Corps Commander Women are in all Corps special units Photos courtesy of the Corps of Cadets Association


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