Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

E. Pauline Johnson Emily Pauline Johnson bridged the gap between Europeans and Indians by writing and performing Indian themed works in a style that appealed.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "E. Pauline Johnson Emily Pauline Johnson bridged the gap between Europeans and Indians by writing and performing Indian themed works in a style that appealed."— Presentation transcript:

1 E. Pauline Johnson Emily Pauline Johnson bridged the gap between Europeans and Indians by writing and performing Indian themed works in a style that appealed to Europeans. (Gridley 72) (An enlarged copy of E. Pauline Johnson’s Signature) (Cochran) Born: March 10, 1861 Died: March 7, 1913

2 Tekahiowake Tekahionwake means “double wampum” or “double life.” Her mother was English and her father was Mohawk Indian. Her education consisted of a blend of traditional Indian heritage and English literature. Pauline Johnson was one of the first writers to focus on themes surrounding Indian women, their mixed heritage, and their quest for identity. (Roemer 6) Her most popular short story, “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” portrays “the dilemma of the mixed-blood woman who must choose between her values and her marriage” to a man of European descent. (Ruoff 67) “ ‘You cannot make me come,’… ‘neither church, nor law, nor even’ …’nor even love can make a slave of a red girl.’” (Gilbert and Gubar 1425) Johnson used two costumes during her performances, a buckskin Indian costume and an evening gown, to emphasize her mixed-blood heritage. (Ruoff 61) (E. Pauline Johnson) (This is a picture of Pauline Johnson wearing a very stylish dress)

3 The Price She Had to Pay Some critics saw her as a woman watering down her Indian heritage in order to cater to European preferences. She struggled with this herself and wrote to her lawyer in 1894 telling him “…I hate and despise brain debasement, literary “potboiling” and yet I have done, will do these things, though I sneer at my own littleness in doing…the reason is that the public will not listen to lyrics, will not appreciate real poetry, will not in fact have me as an entertainer if I give them nothing but rhythm, cadence, beauty, thought.” (Weaver 83) She believed she had to placate to Europeans in order to get her message across, and “duplicity was the price she had to pay in order to gain a hearing.” (Weaver 83) In the introduction to Johnsons’ Moccasin Maker, A. LaVonne Brown Ruoff states that she compromised her “growth as a writer” in order to sell books and tickets to her performances. (Bloom 63) (These young people are posing for the photo in traditional native dress)

4 Was it Worth it? (This card was Pauline’s) (This picture was in a booklet) Johnson was writing during a time of public fear of Indian rebellion due to the Indian wars in the United States and other uprisings in Canada. This fear resulted in the “bloodthirsty savage” stereotype, and Johnson fought this stereotype in her literature. (Bloom 63) When Pauline spoke, audiences listened. Her debut started as a performer in 1892 with A Cry from an Indian Wife: …They never think how they would feel today If some great nation came from far away, Wresting their country from their hapless braves, Giving what they gave us– but wars and graves… Her audience was vast. She toured Canada, Europe and America Until 1912, when her health failed her. Although she may have fluffed up her literature and performances, her intended messages were clear, and she “…spoke loud and bold.” (Roemer 7) Marion Gridley praises her for being able to perform in front of high society while keeping her feet firmly planted on earth. (Gridley 70-71) (This native named Pi-A-Pot poses for the picture)

5 Celebrating 100 Years After Johnson’s Birth
“ ‘ the first Canadian woman, the first Canadian Indian and the first Canadian writer to be honored by a commemorative Canadian stamp in 1961.’” (Weaver 197) (This is a closeup of the Pauline Johnson stamp. It is postmarked for It was the 100th anniversary stamp)

6 Links Sheila Johnston performing parts of The Song My Paddle Sings by Pauline Johnson Movie of Pauline Johnson’s buckskin dress at the Vancouver Museum

7 Works Cited An enlarged copy of E. Pauline Johnson's signature. N.d. Photograph. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. Web. 7 Sept < Bloom, Harold. Native American Woman Writers. Philadelphia. Chelsea House Publishers Net Library. Web. 3 September 2009. Cochran, Portrait of poet Tekahionwake (Pauline E. Johnson) Brantford, Ontario. Framing Canada. Web. 4 September <http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/framingcanada/ e.html>. E. Pauline Johnson. Native American Writers of the United States. Ed. Kenneth M. Roemer. Dictionary of Literary Biography v Detroit: Gale Research, Literature Resource Center. Gale. Lake Land College. 28 Aug E. Pauline Johnson. N.D. Photograph. Chiefswood National Historic Site . Web. 3 Sept, 2009. <http://www.chiefswood.com/pauline.html> Gilbert, Sandra M., and Susan Gubar, eds. The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in English. 3rd ed. Volume 1. New York; Norton, Print. Gridley, Marion E. American Indian Women. New York. Hawthorn Books, Inc Print. “Johnson, Emily Pauline (Tekahionwake, “Double Wampum”) (Mohawk), ” In Encyclopedia of the Haudenosaunee[Iroquois Confederacy], Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, The American Indian Experience. Greenwood Publishing Group. 3 Sep < 1773&path=encyclopedias/greenwood/#textml > Johnston, Sheila. perf. The Song My Paddle Sings. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. N.d. Web. 3 Sept 2009. <http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~pjohnson/movies/flatsj.mov> Pauline Johnson’s buckskin dress at the Vancouver Museum. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. N.d. Web. 3 Sept 2009. < Roemer, Kenneth M., ed. “E. Pauline Johnson.” Native American Writers of the United States. Detroit: Gale Research, Print. Ruoff, A LaVonne Brown. American Indian Literatures. New York. The Modern Language Association of America Print.

8 Works Cited Weaver, Jace. That The People Might Live. New York. Oxford University Press Print. This card was Pauline's. N.d. Photograph. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. Web. 7 Sept 2009. < This is a closeup of the Pauline Johnson stamp. It is postmarked for It was the 100th anniversary stamp. N.d. Photograph. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. Web. 7 Sept < This is a picture of Pauline Johnson wearing a very stylish dress. N.d. Photograph. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. Web. 7 Sept < This native named Pi-A-Pot poses for the picture. N.d. Photograph. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. Web. 7 Sept < This Picture was in a Booklet. N.d. Photograph. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. Web. 7 Sept 2009. < These young people are posing for the photo in traditional native dress. N.d. Photograph. The Pauline Johnson Archive. McMaster University. Web. 7 Sept <


Download ppt "E. Pauline Johnson Emily Pauline Johnson bridged the gap between Europeans and Indians by writing and performing Indian themed works in a style that appealed."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google