Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Week 3: Journalism 2001 September 22, 2008. Whats wrong? 1. Phantoms, not Phantoms 2. Catalog, not catolog 3. too high, not to high 4. All of the above!

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Week 3: Journalism 2001 September 22, 2008. Whats wrong? 1. Phantoms, not Phantoms 2. Catalog, not catolog 3. too high, not to high 4. All of the above!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 3: Journalism 2001 September 22, 2008

2 Whats wrong? 1. Phantoms, not Phantoms 2. Catalog, not catolog 3. too high, not to high 4. All of the above!

3 Extra Credit Opportunities Did anyone attend this? Did anyone attend this? Media Expert: Wednesday, 9/17; 1 p.m., Kirby Rafters Media Expert: Wednesday, 9/17; 1 p.m., Kirby Rafters –Mark Anfinson, an attorney who represents newspapers on behalf of the Minnesota Newspaper Association, will talk about the First Amendment challenges faced by journalists and citizens alike at the recent GOP convention in the Twin Cities. –10 Extra Credit points: Write 5 paragraph summary of what you learned; will be posted on class Web site DUE: 1 Week after event (9/24)

4 Another Extra Credit Opportunity Peter Annin, former Newsweek reporter/researcher Peter Annin, former Newsweek reporter/researcher –Wednesday, September 24 –11 a.m. –Humanities 480 (Jour 2001 class) –10 extra credit points: Submit 5 paragraph summary of what you learned that will be posted on the class Web site Submit 5 paragraph summary of what you learned that will be posted on the class Web site DUE: October 1 DUE: October 1

5 Review of last weeks news

6 DNT Analysis Excellent job! Excellent job! Youre now reading the newspaper with a more critical eye Youre now reading the newspaper with a more critical eye Better understanding of what goes into the newspaper; why editors make story selections Better understanding of what goes into the newspaper; why editors make story selections What surprised you while doing assignment? What surprised you while doing assignment?

7 Journalism Case Studies Rob Karwath Column: Rob Karwath Column: –The future of newspapers is now, and were finding our place The future of newspapers is now, and were finding our placeThe future of newspapers is now, and were finding our place

8 Review: Summary lead assignment Overall great start! Overall great start! Remember: Remember: –One-sentence summary lead, 35 words or less Use dateline Use dateline Write in past tense, active voice Write in past tense, active voice Watch state abbreviations: Fla FL FLA Watch state abbreviations: Fla FL FLA Watch wordiness Watch wordiness –has resulted in the mans death –stunned a man to death –leads to the suspect being shot –M-26 Taser stun gun

9 Heres the summary lead from the Associated Press: HOLLYWOOD, Fla. – A man behaving strangely in front of a hotel died after police shot him with a stun gun, then wrestled him to the ground and handcuffed him because he had not been subdued. Many of your leads are just as strong! HOLLYWOOD, FLA – A man died Sunday after police used a stun gun on him after being called to a hotel where the man had been acting strangely and refused to cooperate with local authorities, which believed the man to be on drugs. A man acting strangely in front of a hotel died after a police officer accidentally killed him with a stun gun when he refused to cooperate and attempted to attack one of them. A man died Sunday when an officer shot him with a M-26 Taser stun gun outside a hotel in Hollywood, Florida after he displayed strange behavior and refused to comply with officers.

10 Lets improve these leads: Lets improve these leads: A man died in a police accident in front of a hotel on Sunday when he resisted arrest forcing officers to shoot him with a M-26 taser, he then ripped the stun darts out of his chest and charged the officers forcing them to subdue him but he died in the hospital shortly after. –Run-on sentence –54 words: too much info – where to cut? –Why?

11 Man is pronounced dead after being tasered by police officer for acting strangely outside a hotel room. –Stick to past tense –When? –A hotel room? –Reads like an announcement, not news story 50,000 volts of electricity hit and killed a man police saw outside a hotel behaving strangely, probably on drugs, and when the matter was pursued he violently attempted to resident arrest. –What type of electricity? –Focus –When? –Intentional killing?

12 Review: Writing a summary lead Usually a single sentence Usually a single sentence No more than 35 words No more than 35 words Bottom line: Bottom line: –Use a single sentence of no more than 35 words to summarize an event

13 Use active voice! Avoid to be Avoid to be a man was killed…. a man was killed…. a man was shot by police…. a man was shot by police…. was behaving strangely was behaving strangely

14 Grammar exercise Dr. Grammar tips: Dr. Grammar tips: –http://www.drgrammar.org/

15 Check egradebook Assignments listed at egradebook: Assignments listed at egradebook: –http://www.d.umn.edu/egradebook If assignments missing that you turned in, let me know ASAP If assignments missing that you turned in, let me know ASAP

16 Assignment due today Summary lead exercises Summary lead exercises –Steps to help you: Identify the five Ws and H Identify the five Ws and H –Who? –What? –When? –Where? –Why? –How? –Determine whats the most important to include –Reminder: Summary lead contains no more than 35 words – assignment, written in Microsoft Word, and send as an attachment to

17 Assignment for 9/29 More summary lead exercises! More summary lead exercises! – –Steps to help you: – –Identify the five Ws and H Who? What? When? Where? Why? How? – –Determine which is the most important to include. – –A summary lead should contain no more than 35 words. – –One sentence strongest summary lead. assignment, written in Microsoft Word, and send as an attachment to assignment, written in Microsoft Word, and send as an attachment to

18 Hard News 1 Story Assignment Work in teams to interview Duluth citizens Work in teams to interview Duluth citizens Each reporter writes own story Each reporter writes own story Interview 8-10 Duluthians Interview 8-10 Duluthians –Might not use all sources in story –List all sources, with contact info, at end of story Groups of 1 to 2: Groups of 1 to 2: –Will finalize groups TONIGHT! Stories will be posted on class Web site: Stories will be posted on class Web site: –Fall Jour 2001 Web site Fall Jour 2001 Web siteFall Jour 2001 Web site

19 Lets brainstorm ideas of where Duluthians gather: Greyhound bus station West Duluth Greyhound bus station West Duluth Amazing Grace café in Canal Park Amazing Grace café in Canal Park Fond du Luth Casino/Old Downtown Fond du Luth Casino/Old Downtown First Street/Cozy Bar/Encounter First Street/Cozy Bar/Encounter Gas station Gas station Miller Hill Mall bus stop Miller Hill Mall bus stop Pizza Luce concert Pizza Luce concert Courthouse Courtyard Courthouse Courtyard Public library Public library Canal Park/Lift bridge Canal Park/Lift bridge WalMart WalMart Dunn Brothers coffee shop Dunn Brothers coffee shop

20 Ideas from last semester UMD Dining Center/Kirby Student Center UMD Dining Center/Kirby Student Center Northlan Gaming Center Northlan Gaming Center –Lincoln Park/West End Encounter/Cozy Bar corner (2 nd Ave. E. & First St.) Encounter/Cozy Bar corner (2 nd Ave. E. & First St.) Spirit Mountain Spirit Mountain Miller Hill Mall Miller Hill Mall Community Center Community Center DECC: Hockey game DECC: Hockey game Downtown: Superior Street Downtown: Superior Street Marshal Performing Arts Center: Play Marshal Performing Arts Center: Play

21 Hard News 1 Story Pitch Due: Wednesday, September 24 Length of story pitch: three paragraphs, about 200 words Length of story pitch: three paragraphs, about 200 words Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Lets look at the calendar:

22 Lets form the groups: 1-3 students Areas where Duluthians gather: Areas where Duluthians gather: –Dining Center: Mary, Ashley, Cody –Amazing Grace: Joli, Kjestine –Portland Square/SA: Betsy –Outside mall: Lauren, Claire –Canal Park: Sara –Super One Kenwood: Aaron –Electric Fetus: Katelin, Kate –Old Downtown Duluth: Gram, Nick –Cozy Corner/Encounter: Dane, Donny, Pat, Mike

23 What topics do you think that sources will identify? Who are you voting for? Who are you voting for? Why? Why? –Iraq war –Economy –Health Care –Afghanistan –Leadership issues –Education –Environment –Race/Gender

24 Assignment for 9/29 Summary lead exercises Summary lead exercises –Steps to help you: Identify the five Ws and H Identify the five Ws and H Whats the focal point? Whats the focal point? –Determine whats the most important to include –Reminder: Summary lead contains no more than 35 words – assignment, written in Microsoft Word, as an attachment to Read Chapters 20, 21 Read Chapters 20, 21

25 Sports Story Story Pitch Due: Wednesday, October 1 Select a UMD or prep sporting event to cover Select a UMD or prep sporting event to cover Length of story pitch: no more than three paragraphs, about 200 words Length of story pitch: no more than three paragraphs, about 200 words Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Complete article due: November 6 Complete article due: November 6

26

27 Chapter 6: Developing a news story Which stories are worth developing? Which stories are worth developing? –Major local news: Weather, fire, derailment, court trial Other factors influencing coverage Other factors influencing coverage –Prejudices of reporters, editors –Size of market –Searching for a scoop –What the competition is doing –What other stories are developing

28 Phase 1: The story breaks What, when, where, to whom What, when, where, to whom Mainbars Mainbars –Reporting the breaking news Sidebars Sidebars –Extra stories that explain news, human interest Examples of stories with followups Examples of stories with followups –Beekeeper story

29 Phase 2: Second-day stories Why, how Why, how Any late-breaking developments Any late-breaking developments –Clean-up, additional fatalities Put story into perspective Put story into perspective

30 Phase 3: Advancing the story Color: Observation, narrative, anecdotes that provide a clear picture of a person or event Color: Observation, narrative, anecdotes that provide a clear picture of a person or event Background Background –Need to keep the news high in the story New information New information

31 Phase 4: Follow-up developments Reporters make routine checks Reporters make routine checks New developments New developments –Release of a report Air crash, investigations Air crash, investigations

32 Checklist for developing stories Report latest news first Report latest news first Put original breaking news high in follow-ups Put original breaking news high in follow-ups Go to the scene; talk to as many people as possible Go to the scene; talk to as many people as possible Always strive to put a face on the tragedy Always strive to put a face on the tragedy Advance each follow-up; new developments Advance each follow-up; new developments Look for new sources; consider all angles Look for new sources; consider all angles Get color Get color Cooperate with other reporters Cooperate with other reporters

33

34 Chapter 7: Quotations, attributions Why use quotes? Why use quotes? –Bring a story to life –Generate emotion –Provide vivid description –Bring a dull story to life

35 Whats the difference between an indirect and a direct quote?

36 Types of quotations Complete direct quotations Complete direct quotations –John Doe said that he did it, she said. Paraphrased quotations Paraphrased quotations –John Doe said that he did it, she said. Partial quotations Partial quotations –John Doe said that he did it, she said

37 Direct quotations Exact quote: quotation marks around sentence Exact quote: quotation marks around sentence Most editors allow reporters to clean up grammar or to take out profanities Most editors allow reporters to clean up grammar or to take out profanities Make sure quotes are right! Make sure quotes are right! Beware of leading questions; use paraphrase Beware of leading questions; use paraphrase

38 Why use direct quotes? Specific, vivid statements Specific, vivid statements Descriptive statements Descriptive statements Inner feelings Inner feelings Capture personality Capture personality Supplement statements of fact Supplement statements of fact Reduce attributions Reduce attributions

39 Paraphrased quotations Indirect quotes Indirect quotes Used when direct quote dull, uninformative Used when direct quote dull, uninformative Must attribute paraphrases to news source Must attribute paraphrases to news source When in doubt, paraphrase When in doubt, paraphrase

40 Partial Quotations Using part of a direct quote, often for emphasis Using part of a direct quote, often for emphasis Can be confusing Can be confusing Be careful: Could draw attention to a point, jeopardizing objectivity Be careful: Could draw attention to a point, jeopardizing objectivity –She told police it was an accident when she hit the tree.

41 Most important rule Never make up quotations or paraphrases Never make up quotations or paraphrases –Shattered Glass: Stephen Glass Story CBS 60 Minutes story CBS 60 Minutes story CBS 60 Minutes story CBS 60 Minutes story Stephen Glass index Stephen Glass index Stephen Glass index Stephen Glass index

42 Which one is right? Text quotes AP Stylebook: Text quotes AP Stylebook: –Quotations normally should be corrected to avoid the errors in grammar and word usage that often occur unnoticed when someone is speaking but are embarrassing in print AP Stylebook: 2006 AP Stylebook: –Never alter quotations even to correct minor grammatical errors or word usage. Casual minor tongue slips may be removed by using ellipses but even that should be done with extreme caution. If there is a question about a quote, either dont use it or ask the speaker to clarify.

43 Pitfalls to avoid in quoting Inaccuracies from source Inaccuracies from source Rambling on and on Rambling on and on Hard-to-understand quotations Hard-to-understand quotations Reconstructed quotations Reconstructed quotations Fragmentary quotations Fragmentary quotations Ungrammatical: If it doesnt make sense, dont use it Ungrammatical: If it doesnt make sense, dont use it Use good taste Use good taste Watch out for offensive language Watch out for offensive language Be certain when using dialect: Be certain when using dialect: –North Country, Fargo

44 Use objective verbs of attribution Straight news stories Straight news stories –Use neutral verbs: said, added Said isnt boring – readers expect it Said isnt boring – readers expect it No need to be creative No need to be creative –Avoid asserted, bellowed, contended, cried, declared, demanded, emphasized, harangued, hinted, maintained, opined, stammered, stated, stressed

45 Identification in attributions Usually identify source by title, name Usually identify source by title, name Follow guidelines in AP Stylebook Follow guidelines in AP Stylebook Title often used to streamline lead Title often used to streamline lead Be cautious with hearsay attribution Be cautious with hearsay attribution –Using a quote from a police report

46 Placement of attributions Usually follows the quotation Usually follows the quotation Normally follows first sentence in multiple sentence quote Normally follows first sentence in multiple sentence quote When sources change, new attribution needed When sources change, new attribution needed Use attribution once in a quotation Use attribution once in a quotation Use attribution between complete, partial quotes Use attribution between complete, partial quotes

47 Anonymous sources On the record: Everything can be used On the record: Everything can be used Off the record: Nothing can be used Off the record: Nothing can be used On background: Material can be used, no attribution by name On background: Material can be used, no attribution by name On deep background: Can be used, with no attribution; can get confirmation On deep background: Can be used, with no attribution; can get confirmation –All the Presidents Men: Woodward & Bernstein

48 Where the quote marks go Useful checklist: Pages of text 1. Jones said, We will be there tomorrow. 2. Jones said that he would be there Wednesday. 3. He will be there Wednesday, Jones said. 4.All our transcontinental flights are full, she said. 5. Coach Jones said that it was his dumbest mistake: deciding to start an untested freshman at quarterback. 6. Coach Jones asked his team, Can we win this game? 7. Johnsons plea to win this game for the community really fired us up, Smith said.

49 8. Were so enthusiastic about this project that we cant stop thinking about it, Jones said. 9. Were so enthusiastic about this project that we cant stop thinking about it, Jones said. We look forward to getting council approval. We hope that will come at the next meeting. 10. Get in there now, the coach said, before I make you run extra laps. 11. I think it is wise to lengthen the school year, Smith said. It would be ludicrous to do so, Johnson said.

50

51 Chapter 10: Interviewing Three main stages: Three main stages: –Research –Setting up the interview –Questions and answers

52 Research Morgues : Newspaper libraries Morgues : Newspaper libraries –Dead stories kept until needed for background –Electronic archives Internet Internet –http://www2.assignmenteditor.com Bound volumes of the paper Bound volumes of the paper Files, earlier stories Files, earlier stories University, public libraries University, public libraries

53 Setting up the interview Make an appointment Make an appointment –Call or your source, time permitting Identify yourself as reporter, name publication Identify yourself as reporter, name publication Set length of interview in advance Set length of interview in advance –Half hour, hour, over lunch Make interview convenient for source Make interview convenient for source Describe the story Describe the story Dress the part Dress the part Be on time! Be on time!

54 Structuring the interview Funnel interview: Most common Funnel interview: Most common –Begin with general background questions –Open-ended questions –End with closed-ended or adversarial questions Inverted-funnel interview Inverted-funnel interview –Key questions asked immediately –Breaking news, sources used to interviews

55 Asking questions Do your homework! Do your homework! Write out your questions Write out your questions –Use reporters notebook, refer back to them –Let the conversation flow – other questions often answered –Make eye contact –Example: Senator interview

56 Closed-ended questions Closed-ended questions –Asked to get precise answer –Useful when already know the answer, need confirmation –Used when source is comfortable –Dont be hostile! Open-ended questions Open-ended questions –Useful when have more time –Often learn unexpected information –Gets sources opinions, feelings –Anything else to add? Anything Im forgetting?

57 Personal questions Personal questions –Tough to ask personal questions after a tragedy –Be compassionate, sympathetic –Do homework, try to interview in person –Break ice with general questions –Soften the question: I know youre busy; sorry to bother you I know youre busy; sorry to bother you –Examples: Sunshine hits the accelerator Sunshine hits the accelerator Flash flood in Buffalo Flash flood in Buffalo

58 Frame questions to fit the storys purpose Frame questions to fit the storys purpose –Every story needs theme, purpose –Focus on the purpose when asking questions –Refer back to questions Establish rapport Establish rapport –Tell sources who you are, what you are doing –Listen, dont argue –Thank sources for their time –Set timeframe for the interview

59 What to do with hostile sources Youre not a lawyer: avoid hostile questions Youre not a lawyer: avoid hostile questions Save tough questions for end of interview Save tough questions for end of interview Be sympathetic, understanding Be sympathetic, understanding Reason with the source Reason with the source Try to understand sources position Try to understand sources position Repeat damaging things that have been said about a source Repeat damaging things that have been said about a source Keep asking questions Keep asking questions

60 Making, using observations Whats unusual – or common? Whats unusual – or common? –Observe surroundings –Demeanor of source –Personal features Examples: Examples: –Successful business leader interview –Train, doll collectors

61 Write fast! Take a lot of notes Take a lot of notes –Listen, dont try to get down all the quotes –Never can have too many notes! –Take notes even if using tape recorder Battery or tape failure, operator error Battery or tape failure, operator error –Using a tape recorder Ask permission Ask permission Can be time consuming Can be time consuming

62 Telephone interview Telephone interview –Type your notes –Identify yourself –Ask permission to tape record interview interview –Tough to ask follow-up questions –Identify yourself –Spell out deadline –Ask for follow-up call –Impersonal; not always the easiest

63 After the interview Thank source Thank source Ask for best way to reach the source – phone or – it have additional questions Ask for best way to reach the source – phone or – it have additional questions Never agree to show the source a story once its written Never agree to show the source a story once its written

64 In-class assignment for tonight To help you develop interviewing skills, during tonights class you will be interviewing Lucy Kragness. She will review her background, and you will ask her questions. –Assume story assignment for the Statesman –To prepare, review Web site, write out questions in advance. – final five paragraph story, written in Microsoft Word, as an attachment by Tuesday (September 23) to: –Story will not be graded; all receive 10 points BUT! 1 point deducted for each style error! BUT! 1 point deducted for each style error!

65 Introductions Instructor: Lucy Kragness Instructor: Lucy Kragness –University of Minnesota Duluth Experience 3/96 to present: Executive Assistant to the Chancellor 3/96 to present: Executive Assistant to the Chancellor 1/05 to present: Jour 2001 instructor 1/05 to present: Jour 2001 instructor 10/90 to 3/96: Alumni Director, University Relations 10/90 to 3/96: Alumni Director, University Relations 8/90 to 10/90: Acting Director, Alumni and Media Relations 8/90 to 10/90: Acting Director, Alumni and Media Relations 11/84 to 10/90: Publications Director, Alumni and Media Relations 11/84 to 10/90: Publications Director, Alumni and Media Relations 3/89 to 5/94: Taught Publications Editing, a three-credit spring quarter journalism course 3/89 to 5/94: Taught Publications Editing, a three-credit spring quarter journalism course 6/85 to 6/90: Volunteer editorial adviser, Statesman student newspaper 6/85 to 6/90: Volunteer editorial adviser, Statesman student newspaper –Freelance Experience: 7/86 to present: Freelance writer, photographer for several regional and national publications 7/86 to present: Freelance writer, photographer for several regional and national publications

66 –Newspaper Experience: 9/83 to 9/84: One-person bureau in Sheridan, Wyo., for the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont. 9/83 to 9/84: One-person bureau in Sheridan, Wyo., for the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont. 3/81 to 9/83: Assistant state editor at the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont. 3/81 to 9/83: Assistant state editor at the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont. 3/80 to 3/81: Managing editor of the Williston Daily Herald, Plains Reporter (weekly) and the Williston Basin Reporter (bi- weekly), all in Williston, N.D. 3/80 to 3/81: Managing editor of the Williston Daily Herald, Plains Reporter (weekly) and the Williston Basin Reporter (bi- weekly), all in Williston, N.D. 11/79 to 3/80: Assistant managing editor/Sunday editor at the Williston Daily Herald 11/79 to 3/80: Assistant managing editor/Sunday editor at the Williston Daily Herald 6/79 to 11/79: Reporter, business editor at the Williston Daily Herald 6/79 to 11/79: Reporter, business editor at the Williston Daily Herald 11/78 to 6/79: Assistant editor at the Northeaster newspaper in Minneapolis. 11/78 to 6/79: Assistant editor at the Northeaster newspaper in Minneapolis. –Education: Master of Education in Educational Computing and Technology, University of Minnesota Duluth, Master of Education in Educational Computing and Technology, University of Minnesota Duluth, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Minnesota Minneapolis, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Minnesota Minneapolis, 1979.

67 Portfolio Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp


Download ppt "Week 3: Journalism 2001 September 22, 2008. Whats wrong? 1. Phantoms, not Phantoms 2. Catalog, not catolog 3. too high, not to high 4. All of the above!"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google