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Build versus Bring: Exploring New Options for Food Banks The Food Bank of Northern Nevada, Inc. Cherie Jamason, President & CEO / 775-331-3663.

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Presentation on theme: "Build versus Bring: Exploring New Options for Food Banks The Food Bank of Northern Nevada, Inc. Cherie Jamason, President & CEO / 775-331-3663."— Presentation transcript:

1 Build versus Bring: Exploring New Options for Food Banks The Food Bank of Northern Nevada, Inc. Cherie Jamason, President & CEO /

2 Food banks today are – Feeding more people than ever before – Purchasing more supplemental food – Mobilizing more resources – Employing more people and owning more stuff – Raising more money – Spending more to operate After 35 Years in Business and Five Years of Recession 2

3 In a word…. NO What does that mean? Many things… – The method we have chosen may not work – The mission/goal may not be correct – Hard work may not be enough anymore – Our options may need to evolve – All of the above Have We Ended Hunger? 3

4 What Does the World Look Like? Chronic high need due to: – Under-employment and chronic low employment – Aging population, more seniors with fewer retirement resources – Disabled veterans – Middle class stagnation – wages not rising with cost of living, reductions in employer paid benefits – people are falling further and further behind – Young people graduating from college with no or few job prospects – Under-educated families working several jobs and still unable to pay for basic needs – Job availability has contracted due to technological advances, leaner operations, knowledge work vs. manufacturing – In a nutshell, a growing under-resourced population**** 4

5 What Does OUR World Look Like? In Nevada, as a result: – 22.1% of children are in poverty (144,440) – 1 in 4 (28%) live in homes that cannot reliably provide 3 meals per day – One in (5-6) in Nevada must rely on SNAP for basic nutrition – Unemployment is still at 9.5%, with 10 counties at 10% or more as of June – Peoples lives are not working, and that is why they need help. And not just help with food. 5

6 If you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always gotten Henry Ford Tony Robbins Mark Twain Albert Einstein 6

7 The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes. –Marcel Proust 7

8 Hunger Relief through Food Distribution 1988: 417,000 meals 2013: 9.7 million meals Partner Agencies Children: Summer & after-school meals Back-Pack weekend food bags School Pantries Seniors: Commodities (CSFP) Underserved Demographics Urban: Mobile Pantry Rural: Mobile Pantry CSFP Summer Food Back-Pack Underserved Geographies 8

9 Hunger Relief through Outreach & Advocacy Households Approved for Benefits: FY08:1,500 FY13:7,137 $11.4M in benefits 4,303,875 meals 9 SNAP / Food Stamps Farm Bill SNAP Interview & Administrative Options School Meal Performance State Food Security Plan Advocacy

10 Ending Hunger by Building Self-Sufficiency and Community Sustainability Nutrition Education Food Smarts (children) Smart Shopper (parents) Nutrition on Wheels Community-Based Projects – Examples: EBT at Farmers Markets Community Gardens Farm-to-School Cottage Food Business Incubator Food Systems Development Getting Ahead Workshops for clients Systemic Change through Bridges Community Engagement Bridges Out of Poverty 10

11 11 Hunger Relief through Food Distribution 1988: 417,000 meals 2013: 9.7 million meals Partner Agencies Children: Summer & after-school meals Back-Pack weekend food bags School Pantries Seniors - Commodities (CSFP) Underserved Demographics Urban & Rural: Mobile Pantry CSFP Summer Food Back-Pack Underserved Geographies Hunger Relief through Outreach & Advocacy Farm Bill SNAP Interview & Administrative Options School Meal Performance State Food Security Plan Households Approved for Benefits: FY08:1,500 FY13:7,137 $11.4M in benefits 4,303,875 meals SNAP / Food StampsAdvocacy Ending Hunger by Building Self-Sufficiency and Community Sustainability Nutrition Education Bridges Out of Poverty Food Systems Food Smarts Smart Shopper Nutrition on Wheels Farm-to-School Food Policy/Councils Community Gardens Getting Ahead Workshops Systemic Change - Bridges Community Engagement Immediate Relief Medium- Term Long-Term, Sustainable Solutions

12 How Did We Get Here/There? By evolving our thinking as a result of… – Data/information (hunger studies, local data, Nevadas abysmal rankings on just about everything good) – Deepening our understanding about our clients – Identifying barriers in our community (lack of affordable housing and transportation systems, high cost of child care, etc.) – Clarity about impact of our role – we changed our mental model 12

13 Mental Models of Food Banking 1970s – FI/FO– no direct service – ending waste… 1990s – Food in/out + perhaps Kids Café 2000s – FI/FO plus Kids Café, community kitchens, mobile pantries… onward – FBs have added grocery rescue, SNAP & EITC outreach, nutrition education, community gardens, community partnerships, immunization clinics, diabetes screening, benefit banks, workforce programs, etc… Addressing Hunger part of mission statements… Food banks have evolved to meet the needs of our communities, in a way that fits our own organizations. 13

14 Mental Models Are internal pictures of how the world works Exist below awareness Are theories-in-use, often unexamined Determine how we act Can help or interfere with learning Source: The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook, (1994), by Peter Senge. For a dialogue to occur, we must suspend our mental models. 14

15 What if Our Mental Models Were… We are powerful community leaders We address hunger and its root causes We partner to help clients achieve stability and self-sufficiency We support improvement of economic mobility We believe the best solution to hunger is a job that pays a living wage We engage our community in solutions 15

16 Root Cause - Housing Trends State-level findings (2009): In 30 states, more than two full-time minimum wage jobs are required to afford the two-bedroom FMR. In 34 states, an extremely low-income (ELI) household cannot afford to spend more than $500 per month on rent and utilities. In 11 states, a household must work at least two full- time jobs at the minimum wage to afford the two- bedroom FMR in the states combined nonmetropolitan areas. Source: Out of Reach 2009, National Low Income Housing Coalition, Keith E. Wardrip, senior research analyst; Danilo Pelletiere, research director; Sheila Crowley, president. 16

17 The math of poverty doesnt work And about 35% of their after-tax income is spent on food. More than 60% spend more than ½ of their income on housing. For 43.6 million Americans… 17

18 The Wage Question If you did everything your caseworker told you to dogot a job and kept it for a year, never missing a day of workhow much closer (if at all) would you be to being out of poverty and living a sustainable life at the end of that year than you were at the beginning? 18

19 19 Education for individuals/families in poverty to build resources for sustainability Education for those who serve, employ, touch underserved individuals Community Strategies for Systemic Change

20 Changing the Conversation If current activities are not ending hunger, how do we help people become more sustainable? How can we: – help our community become more sustainable across economic sectors? – support improvement of economic mobility? – shift from bring to build? 20

21 Application of the Economic Class Lens Copyright J. Pfarr Consulting. Reproduced with permission 21

22 Financial Emotional Mental Spiritual Physical 22 Poverty is the Extent to which an Individual Does without Resources Support Systems Relationships/Role Models Knowledge of Hidden Rules Coping Strategies

23 Mental Models Are internal pictures of how the world works Exist below awareness Are theories-in-use, often unexamined Determine how we act Can help or interfere with learning Source: The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook, (1994), by Peter Senge. For a dialogue to occur, we must suspend our mental models. 23

24 Developed by Phil DeVol (2006) 24 Mental Model for Poverty

25 The need to act overwhelms any willingness people have to learn. Source: The Art of the Long View by Peter Schwartz. The healthier you are psychologically, or the less you may seem to need to change, the more you can change. Source: Management of the Absurd, (1996), by Richard Farson. 25 Tyranny of the Moment

26 Abstract P L AN S Procedural steps on the path forward 26 Mental Model for Theories of Change Concrete What Life is Like Now New Life Goals

27 27 Mental Model of Middle Class

28 28 What happens inside the institutional and community bubbles? Concrete Abstract What its like now Solve the same problem again and again Short-termism Deliver immediate results With short-term funding Remain stuck in the tyranny of the moment When the bubble bursts, try to recover with the same old solutions Copyright © 2006 aha! Process, Inc. P L AN S New Mental Model/ New Outcome

29 Community Position/Credibility Community Leadership History of Accountability Minimal Turf and Culture of Collaboration On the Ground Strategy – Two Paths Internal – Food Bank & Partner Agencies External – Community Engagement We can bring people to the table 29 Why Food Banks?

30 Whats Next? 30 Read: Bridges to a Sustainable Community by Dr. Philip DeVol (available on Amazon) Come: Free 6 hour Day 1 training in Reno Available in Other Communities Also Listen: Bridges Out of Poverty – An Overview Host: Bridges Community Presentation Engage: Your board and staff - Talk about whats possible!!

31 31 If we dont take a long-term view, then we wont make long-term change.

32 Innovators are often not the principal agents of change; early adapters are. –Michael Fairbanks 32 A Few Parting Thoughts…


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