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Carlin Springs Community School Evaluation for 2007-2008.

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Presentation on theme: "Carlin Springs Community School Evaluation for 2007-2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Carlin Springs Community School Evaluation for

2 A community school: Uses the public school as a hub to bring together community partners to address not only academic needs, but also social, emotional, and health needs of students and their families -- before, during and after school. An integrated focus on academics, services, and opportunities leads to improved student learning, stronger families and healthier communities.

3 Carlin Springs Demographics students grades pre-K-12 Approximately 30 countries represented 78% free and reduced lunch 63% Limited English Proficiency 15% Asian, 16% Black (includes African), 64% Hispanic, 4% white 100% great kids!

4 Goals and Objectives Goal: –Improve academic performance Four objectives –Increase opportunities for after-school activities that reinforce the curriculum –Increase parents involvement so they can become more effective partners in their childrens education. –Increase parents skills in English, literacy, and technology. –Increase access to health, mental health and social services for families

5 Partners 29 partner organizations –Greenbrier Learning Center –AHC, Inc. (Harvey Hall) –Arlington, Va. Federal Credit Union –Spellbinders –Kids Café –Arlington Soccer Association 5 grants 45 community volunteers

6 Evaluation Data Collected multiple types of data for all students K-5 and their parents Data to assess academic improvement –Standardized test scores (PALs and SOLs) –Teacher assessments of changes in performance in four areas: class participation, behavior, homework and academics Data to assess family stability –Student tardiness and absenteeism

7 Evaluation Data (cont.) Data on program participation –Parent participation in school events and parent workshops –Student participation in enrichments and/or tutoring –Regular attendees are students with 30 or more days of participation in enrichments and/or tutoring –Home visits, lunch buddies, and referrals

8 After-school Academic Enrichments (Objective 1) Activities: 23 enrichments 3 tutoring programs Offered By: 26 teachers (paid and volunteer) 13 community members (paid and volunteer) 8 community organizations (PRCR, E*Trade, Educational Theater Co., 4-H, Arlington Soccer…) The idea is to reinforce and complement what is learned during the school day.

9 After-school Activities (Objective 1) Outcomes Participation in Number of students Percent of students grades K-5 At least one enrichment21450% At least one cycle of tutoring12830% At least 30 days of activity (enrichments, tutoring or both) 13030% At least 16 days of activities 18443% Student Participation in Tutoring and Enrichment Activities

10 After-school participants more likely to improve performance

11 Effect of Participation on Standardized Tests : Participants as likely to pass

12 After-school participants at-risk for failure more likely to pass standardized tests Percent passing SOLs Less than 30 Days of Participation 30 or more days of Participation Reading4552 Math3136

13 After-school participants spend more time at school

14 Parent Involvement (Objective 2) Outreach Activities: Principals Coffee (new format) home visits bus stop visits calendars, flyers, stickers evening office hours for report card explanations Spring 07 parent survey

15 Parent Involvement (Objective 2), cont Parent/Family Activities: Back-to-School Night, Conferences 2 Curriculum Nights 5 Family Library Nights Too Smart to Start and Middle School Transition Meetings for 5 th grade parents Welcome Back Picnic, Fall Festival, International Dinner, Concerts

16 Parent Involvement (Objective 2) Outcomes 35% of parents attended Back-to-School Night 77% attended Fall P-T conferences 80% attended Spring P-T conferences 86 parents attended one or more coffees 98 parents attended one or more workshops 187 parents attended one or more family program with educational content (e.g. Library Nights, curriculum nights) 44 parent volunteers, 30 on a regular basis

17 Parent Involvement Outcomes, cont. Tracked participation in eight types of parent/family events –Low involvement parents participated in 0 to 2 types –High involvement parents participated in 3 or more Parent Involvement No involvement8% Low Involvement (0 to 2)44% High Involvement (3 or more)56%

18 Students with high-involvement parents more likely to improve

19 Spring 07 Parent Survey Outcomes 149 parents surveyed 49 in English, 96 in Spanish 94% were satisfied or very satisfied with communication with school staff. 95% agreed or strongly agreed that school staff help me learn how to help my child succeed in school. 99% agreed or strongly agreed that the teacher really cares about my child. 89% agreed or strongly agreed that my child needs more opportunities for educational activities after school.

20 Increase Parents Skills (Objective 3) Activities: Sharing the Dream parent leadership grant Project Family developmental playgroups Financial Literacy Workshops Linkages to REEP English classes Workshops at coffees on how to support your childs learning at home, summer learning activities, etc.

21 Areas of most interest to parents for workshops/skills (07 survey) Education/Job Skills: English as a second language 62% Using a Computer 64% Reading skills 52% Parenting: Child growth and development 52% Helping my child stay healthy 58% Discipline 63% Childs Education: Helping my child read 67% Helping my child with homework and tests 62% Helping my child with math 55% Preparing for middle school and beyond 50%

22 Increase Parents Skills (Objective 3), cont. Outcomes: Somewhat improved parent leadership 98 parent/caregivers attended at least one Project Family playgroup at Carlin Springs (core group of about 30 pairs) –91% of parents met parenting objectives –59% of toddlers reached developmental milestones 26 parents attended REEP English classes 23 parents participated in Financial Literacy workshops 25 parents attended PEATCY workshop 86 parents attended one or more coffee workshops

23 Family Access to Resources (Objective 4) Areas of most interest to parents for services (07 survey): Dental Services 52% Health Care and insurance 50% Citizenship and immigration issues 43% Family counseling/mental health 41%

24 Family Access to Resources (Objective 4) Activities and Outcomes Bilingual Parent Liaison made 231 referrals to community resources for families in Referrals by school nurse in : -35 students referred for dental care -52 children referred for medical care; 24 followed through. -8 referred for social services -175 students given vision screenings, with 60 referred for further evaluation Health Fair with 10 community partners: 72 families attended, 14 families trained and received car seats

25 Family Access to Resources (Objective 4), cont. ½ time DHS Bilingual Mental Health Therapist: Saw 30 students on a regular basis (individual and in groups) during school year and summer Crisis support Classroom presentations on re-unification, acculturation, bullying Parent coffee presentations on social/emotional issues Consultations with teachers, parents, nurse Summer reunification lunch group with 11 students Referrals to social services Referred 5 parents for ongoing mental health at 3033 (none followed through)

26 Three-Year Trends: Parent Involvement

27 Three-year Trends: Tardy and Absent

28 Three-year Trends: After-school Participation

29 Challenges Constraints on after-school activities offered: –Bus space –Qualified tutors Family mobility Parent availability, leadership Sustainability

30 Conclusions Students benefit from –after-school activities –parent involvement –family supports Having a community school infrastructure attracts and sustains partnerships Several factors limit potential to realize maximum benefits


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