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ANDREJSALA: TRANSFORMATION THROUGH TIME Part IV. RAILWAY AND RĪGA-KRASTA STATION Railway infrastructure saw a rapid expansion in Latvia in 1889 to 1901.

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Presentation on theme: "ANDREJSALA: TRANSFORMATION THROUGH TIME Part IV. RAILWAY AND RĪGA-KRASTA STATION Railway infrastructure saw a rapid expansion in Latvia in 1889 to 1901."— Presentation transcript:

1 ANDREJSALA: TRANSFORMATION THROUGH TIME Part IV

2 RAILWAY AND RĪGA-KRASTA STATION Railway infrastructure saw a rapid expansion in Latvia in 1889 to In 1889, a new railway branch was designed for connecting the Mīlgrāvis Station to the Customs Embankment in Andrejsala. An agreement setting forth the construction and operation of the branches was signed in 1892; three years later the 2.1-mile (3.6-km) line began operating. The station in Andrejsala took the form of a one-storey wooden building housing telegraph and offices.

3 A late-1800s plan for building the railway branches connecting to the elevator.

4 Several railway access branches were built in Andrejsala. In 1901, there were three branches on each side of the elevator. In 1905, one of them was extended up to the Unions cold-storage warehouse and, in 1911, up to the north end of Andrejsala. The second branch reached from the Rīga-Krasta station farther between the railway storehouses. In 1905, the elevator branch became connected with the Rīga–Pskov line. A map of Rīga, charted in 1907 by T. G. Ruckis. Source: LNL.

5 The Rīga-Krasta station, within the ports territory, was founded in 1907, which took care of the distribution of the import and export railway freight. It consisted of more than 10 buildings. The Rīga-Krasta railway station, built in 1900, before the reconstruction in the 1980s. Source: MLD.

6 In the 1920s, the station also handled passenger traffic. Andrejsala has had Russian-gauge railways since they were first built, however until 1936 it also had the standard-gauge ones. In the 2nd World War, Andrejsalas railway branches were damaged. The access branches of the Rīga-Krasta Station were reconstructed in On the whole, the stations purpose hasnt changed, and it still handles the administration of railway freight. The railway stations building in Andrejsala will be preserved and adapted for new functions. Source: JAU.

7 UNIONS COLD-STORAGE WAREHOUSE In 1901, Rīgas Municipality signed an agreement with the British Vestey Brothers business company regarding lease of land for building a cold-storage warehouse. It operated under the trade name of Union noliktavas-saldētavas biedrība. In 1902, a four-storey brick building began operating, housing the cold storage of butter, eggs, fish, fruit and game.

8 A year 1907 map of Rīga, charted by T. G. Ruckis. Source: LNL.

9 A fragment of a Rīgas map, made according to the survey of 1903 to Source: LNL.

10 The façade of the 4-storey cold-storage warehouse, in architect W. Bokslaffs design, Source: RCC CDD.

11 The cold-storage machinery building in architect W. Bokslaffs design, Source: RCC CDD.

12 A cross-section of the cold-storage warehouse in architect W. Bokslaffs design (1901). Source: RCC CDD.

13 In 1902, wooden loading platforms were built on both sides of the cold-storage warehouse in order to facilitate freight handling. Two years later, a wooden moorage was constructed in the Daugava near it. In 1905, next to the existing building, Union began building another five-storey cold-storage. It also added a butter sorting facility and a residential building with three flats for employees.

14 A cross-section of the 5-storey cold-storage warehouse in architect W. Bokslaffs design (1904). Source: RCC CDD.

15 The façades of the butter sorting building and the residential building, designed in 1905 by architect W. Bokslaff. Source: RCC CDD.

16 The underground floor of the butter sorting building and the residential building, designed in 1905 by architect W. Bokslaff. Source: RCC CDD.

17 The top-down view and cross-section of the butter sorting building and the residential building, drawn in 1905 by architect W. Bokslaff. Source: RCC CDD.

18 In 1911, Union added a one-storey warehouse and another seven- storey cold-storage building. Near the latter, there was also a passenger boat moorage. The façade of the 7-storey cold-storage warehouse, designed in 1909 by architect W. Bokslaff.

19 The floor plan of the 7-storey cold-storage warehouses ground floor, designed in 1909 by architect W. Bokslaff.

20 A cross-section of the 7-storey cold-storage warehouse, designed in 1909 by architect W. Bokslaff.

21 A year 1901 general outline of the cold-storage complex.

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23 A year 1904 general outline of the cold-storage complex.

24 A year 1905 general outline of the cold-storage complex.

25 A year 1909 general outline of the cold-storage complex.

26 Unions cold-storage complex in early 1900s. Source: MHRN.

27 After the 1st World War, the cold-storage warehouses resumed their business only partially. Unions cold-storages were sold to the Ministry of Finance in 1937, and the company itself was shut down. The cold-storage was run by the State Cold-Storage Bureau. The wartime actions of 1944 totally destroyed the cold-storage complex. Andrejsala in late 1930s. The farther background shows the cold-storage complex, fronted by the Agricultural Ministrys Grain Offices elevator. Source: MHRN.

28 ANDREJSALAS POWER STATION In 1900, Rīga decided to fund the building and operating of a power station. Its designing was begun in 1901 by the German engineer O. von Müller. O. von Müllers technical drawing of the Central Rīga Power Station Three-phase Electricity and Low-voltage Distribution Network.

29 In 1903, the Rīga City Council signed off O. von Müllers architectural designs and, a year later, the power stations building was completed. It had two funnels, 60 and 65 metres tall, respectively. The unveiling of the power station took place in May The power station, viewed from the side of Unions cold-storage warehouse in early 1900s. Photo by V. Rīdzenieks.

30 In 1910, the power stations output began to be increased. In 1913, there were three operational steam generators, three steam turbines and a dozen steam boilers. Before the 1st World War, the power stations boiler room was reconstructed. Andrejsalas power station was Rīgas first source of electricity and a major node of its power grid. Source: PGM.

31 The 1st World War halted the power stations operation, and some of the machinery was evacuated in 1915 and As the citys power consumption grew in the post-war years, the power station had to be gradually expanded to increase its output. A view of the south side of the power station complex. Photo by V. Rīdzenieks.

32 In 1926, the third, 84.8-metre high funnel was completed, begun to be built already before the war. Andrejsalas power station complex. Photo by V. Rīdzenieks.

33 There were discussions on expanding the power station in 1928, however the government approved a solution proposing the building of a hydroelectric plant near the Dole Island on the Daugava. The repeated requests for funding were denied by the Ministry of Finance in A map of the Daugavas downstream part in 1930 (fragment). Source: LNL.

34 When the German army retreated from Rīga in 1944, it blew up Andrejsalas power station, leaving only its main façade standing. The remains of the destroyed power station. Source: PGM.

35 After the war, reconstruction could begin, employing German POWs as the workforce. The facility was now named Rīga State District Power Station or VRES. Renovation of the power stations interior in 1945 to Source: PGM.

36 Renovation of the power station in 1945 to Source: PGM.

37 A railway unit housing generators on the railway tracks near the power station in the post-war years. Source: PGM.

38 The power stations first refurbished turbo generator began running in April In the same year, an official unveiling of the rebuilt Rīgas VRES took place. At the unveiling of the rebuilt Rīgas VRES: Latvian SSRs Chairman of the Cabinet of Ministers Vilis Lācis (front left), Supreme Councils Chairman Augusts Kirchenšteins, Latvian SSRs Communist Partys Central Committees High Secretary Jānis Kalnbērziņš and the Baltic Military Regions General Commander Ivan Bagramyan. Source: PGM.

39 The Ukrainian city of Lviv, in 1946 to 1947, developed a reconstruction project for the VRES, which provided for an expansion of the factory floors, while preserving the historic buildings façades most characteristic architectural features and components. The power stations 1946/47 reconstruction designs perspective rendering. Source: PGM.

40 The electric power station during the reconstruction. Source: PGM.

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42 Under Soviets, all economic activity was inextricably accompanied by propaganda of the state ideology. The power station had to have a dedicated information room. Source: PGM.

43 Assembly of the power stations machinery. Source: PGM.

44 Renovation of the power station in late 1940s. The façade is adorned for the International Workers Day. Source: PGM.

45 An upgrade of the power stations rated output followed in Two years later, it added natural gas an alternative fuel alongside coal. In 1967, the station began outputting also heat, by burning black oil fuel. The Rīga VRES employees at the 50-year anniversary of the power station in Source: PGM.

46 Checking and adjusting the power-stations machinery. Source: PGM.

47 The power stations hardware. Source: PGM.

48 The power stations electricity generating function was retired in On the 31st of May, it ceased generating heat. The buildings future plan sees it as the home of the new Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art. A modern view of the former power station complex. Source: JAU.

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50 The blueprints for the Museum of Contemporary Art have been designed by the Dutch company Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), led by architect Rem Koolhaas. The art institution is expected to foster the growth both of Andrejsala and of the arts and culture environment of the entire Latvian capital. A rendering of the future Museum of Contemporary Art by OMA.

51 Special thanks: Ingrīda Miklāva and Aigars Miklāvs; Museum of History of Rīga and Navigation (MHRN); Power Generation Museum (PGM); Museum of Latvijas dzelzceļš (MLD); Rīga City Councils City Development Department (RCC CDD). The presentation also makes use of material provided by the Latvian National Archive of History (LNAH), the Latvian National History Museum (LNHM) and the Latvian National Library (LNL). © Jaunrīgas attīstības uzņēmums, 2009


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