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To Accompany Comprehensive, Alternate, and Texas Editions American Government: Roots and Reform, 10th edition Karen OConnor and Larry J. Sabato Pearson.

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Presentation on theme: "To Accompany Comprehensive, Alternate, and Texas Editions American Government: Roots and Reform, 10th edition Karen OConnor and Larry J. Sabato Pearson."— Presentation transcript:

1 To Accompany Comprehensive, Alternate, and Texas Editions American Government: Roots and Reform, 10th edition Karen OConnor and Larry J. Sabato Pearson Education, 2009 Chapter 15 The Media

2 Print Media Newspapers first appeared as early as In the early days of the U.S., the press was partisan. In mid-1800s, the penny press evolved. The late 1800s was the era of yellow journalism. The 1920s gave rise to muckraking. Today the press tries to be more objective.

3 Broadcast Media Radio news evolved in early 1900s. Today, talk radio is a source of political commentary. Television becomes major news source in 1960s. It remains a major news source today.It remains a major news source today Movement away from network news to cable. Growth of comedy news programs.

4 New Media Newspapers and television use Web sites. People who read Internet news also use other sources.People who read Internet news also use other sources Also provides access to other countries news. Debate over whether the Internet is good for politics.

5 Current Media Trends Influence of networks, affiliates, and wire services. Increasing media consolidation. Greater reliance on experts and pundits. Use of cable channels for narrowcasting.narrowcasting Development of technological innovations such as blogs. Growth in number of citizen journalists.

6 Rules Governing the Media Standards and norms of the journalistic profession Telecommunications Act. Content regulation of the broadcast media. Equal time rule. Prior restraint not permitted.

7 Interactions with the Media Officials may issue press releases. May also hold briefings or conferences. Speak to reporters on background or deep background. May also get information off the record. New York Times v. Sullivan (1964) sets libel boundaries.

8 Covering Government President garners most attention through bully pulpit. Speaks through press secretary or press conferences.press conferences Coverage of the president is generally unfavorable. Congress 535 members pose a challenge. Coverage of Congress is also generally negative. Supreme Court is more private; coverage is limited.

9 Medias Influence on the Public Press has little effect on long term beliefs. Media effects may lead to short term changes in opinion. Media sways uncommitteds and raises new issues. May also play agenda setting and framing roles.

10 Media Bias Questions about effects of media bias. Media bias unavoidable--journalists are human. Media generally thought to be liberal. Recent growth of conservative news sources. Looking at good stories over issues. Can be charmed by interesting personalities.

11 Confidence in the Media General confidence is on a downturn. Republicans are more critical than Democrats. Democrats and Republicans use different sources. Ideological fragmentation may be cause for concern. People tend to choose news that supports their opinion.

12 AV- Partisan Bias Back

13 Figure Where Americans Get News Back

14 Figure Presidential Press Conferences Back

15 Table News Generation Gap Back

16 Table Sources of Campaign News Back


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