Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL MARCH 20, 2009 A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL MARCH 20, 2009 A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL."— Presentation transcript:

1 A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL MARCH 20, 2009 A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL MARCH 20, 2009 COMMUNITY WATER INITIATIVE IN ZUKPURI TRADITIONAL AREA OF THE NADOWLI DISTRICT OF GHANA

2 1.0 OVERVIEW OF PRESENTATION 1. Potable water crisis 2. Description of devices that were bridged 3. Project Impact 4. Stakeholder participation/consultation 5. Sustainability 6. Innovative Ideas

3

4 1.0Potable Water Crisis in Zukpuri Traditional Area Poor access to potable water of the 4,500 people in my traditional area in this era of development is a crime against my people. Children are unable to go school, youth are migrating to urban areas and the adults are unable to farm because of guinea worm. [Mohammed Zingtang Youth Leader in Zukpuri – September 2007]

5 1.0Drinking Water Sources in Zukpuri Traditional Area before the project

6 1.0 Water Crisis in Zukpuri before the project 4,500 people in the traditional area had no access to potable water, and very poor sanitary conditions. Women and children spent between 4-5 hours daily looking for river water. Over 60% of children in school-going age not in school. Engaged in domestic chores. Women and children were vulnerable to water borne diseases. Incidence of guinea worm infestation was about 100 persons annually. Women were not involved in making decisions, planning and implementing potable water and sanitation programs

7 2. The Water Divide Low public investment in water & sanitation Ineffective Water Governance Remoteness and settlement pattern Cultural beliefs superstitions Sophisticated technologies in water supply Increased Poverty & disease Increased Poverty & disease Environmental Degradation Environmental Degradation Water insecurity

8 3. Bridging the Water Divide- mobilizing community funds Community introduced levies on citizens and non-citizens living in the cities. (About US$2,400 was mobilised in year one) Fines were introduced to promote good environmental management – indiscriminate setting of wildfire, illegal harvesting of trees, destruction of watersheds; desecration of traditional protected areas, rape attracted local fine US$1-2. (About US$200 was collected in year one) Community account was opened and all monies mobilized were lodged in the accounts. Fund managers were appointed by the people and funds mobilised used as matching funds for CWI support.

9 3. Bridging the Divide - promoting effective water governance Community water and sanitation committee Formulate community water supply and management plan Water delivery implementation mechanisms Effective water governance.

10 3. Bridging the Divide – Using traditional technologies in water delivery Performing traditional rites in hydrogeological survey Using traditional sticks in hydrogeological survey Using traditional equipment in well digging Using local materials in potable water provision

11 3. Bridging the Divide– traditional technologies in water delivery Dialogue with traditional leaders for improved water regulations Adopt indigenous skills philosophies in water delivery services Consult traditional leaders water maintenance cost Adopt traditional mechanisms in conflict resolution Sustainable Rural Potable water supply

12 3. Bridging the Divide – Building local capacity in self help potable water supply Certified Rural Water Engineers Drilling and casing of small diameter deep wells Fitting of hand made pumps Hydro-geological surveys Assembling of hand pumps Water purification and treatment Pipe/Hand pump water maintenance

13 3. Bridging the Divide – Promoting multiple use of water for food security. Harvest waste water from homes and pipe stands for backyard gardening Dry season vegetable gardening Community tree nursery Grain farms under drip irrigation

14 3. Bridging the Divide – Introducing sustainable land management Drip irrigation Land preparation for irrigation

15 4.0 Impact of Implemented Activity …. Now Zukpuri drinks good water available at our door steps. My children go to school early everyday; I have more time to process quality shea butter for the export market; my brothers from the city can visit the village and stay for many days; and my husband get enough water for dry season gardening. We are very grateful for brining us new life. (Madam Abibata, Magazia of Zukpuri, October 2009)

16 4.0 Impact of Implemented Activity 4,500 people in water stress areas benefited from potable water supply. Water coverage in Zukpuri traditional areas has improved: 150 persons have access to one Hand-dug well; Walking distance to water facilities are not more than 500 meters from the collection point; 20litres/capita /day (minimum); Consistent water flow Two teams of Rural Water Engineers capable of constructing hand dug wells have been formed generating permanent job for 12 people in the northern savannah. Six communities outside the traditional area have contracted the Rural Water Engineers for potable water supply.

17 5. Project Outcome Local government has adopted the technology to reach out to other water stressed communities. Other donors have pledged to support the group improve on technology by introducing low cost well and pumps. Community operated tree nurseries have produced enough seedlings for rehabilitation of degraded areas Watersheds are being conserved as community forests and placed under sustainable management to stabilize water tables Farm families are adopting dry season vegetable farming as alternative income activity during the 6 months dry period.

18 Outcomes Mechanisms identified through the water projects help to increase the investment of local communities in sustainable land management (i.e. enhanced benefit sharing) Clean water made available to enable women to process shea butter oil to meet the export market demands.

19 6. Stakeholder Participation and Consultation StakeholderActivities undertaken Traditional Leaders Changing the mind set of the people on some cultural values Improvement of water-use efficiency by recycling water. Promotion of indigenous practices for sustainable water use. Youth Training as rural water engineers Conservation and sustainable management of watersheds and riparian vegetation. Upland farming through organic farming Government Agencies - Ghana Water Company Training of water engineers in water maintenance practices Testing of water quality Donors – CWI, TPRW Funding support Improved technologies

20 5.Sustainability Technology being used are simple and can be easily replicated Availability of local technical expertise in water provision. Local funds created to maintain the facilities. Synergy and partnership built with other donors with different approaches to rural water supply. Capital outlay for water provision is relatively very small

21 6.Commitment The trained Rural Water Engineers have acquired own equipment for providing hand dug wells with pumps. The local people are promoting productive use of water – for humans, agriculture, small business enterprise and animals. Building partnership with other communities for rural water supply. Traditional leaders committed to solving local water crisis with own resources

22 7. Originality and Innovative Ideas Incorporating traditional knowledge in hydro- geological surveys Certifying rural water engineers and promoting maintenance culture. Trained women are mostly available for maintenance. Involvement of women in resource management is potential asset for transforming rural economies. Creates innovation. Using local material to build hand pumps

23 8. The way forward Assist the Rural Water Engineers to identify improved appropriate, cost effective technologies for potable water supply. Identify appropriate water filtering systems for households outside the potable water supply areas Standardized the traditional knowledge in hydro- geological surveys Train more women mostly for maintenance. Build partnership for water supply. Use local material to build hand pumps for drip irrigation

24


Download ppt "A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL MARCH 20, 2009 A PRESENTATION MADE BY GEORGE ORTSIN AT WORLD WATER FORUM IN ISTANBUL."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google