Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Road Diets Jennifer A. Rosales, P.E. Senior Professional Associate Supervising Transportation Engineer Presentation to ACEC/ODOT April 15, 2008.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Road Diets Jennifer A. Rosales, P.E. Senior Professional Associate Supervising Transportation Engineer Presentation to ACEC/ODOT April 15, 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Road Diets Jennifer A. Rosales, P.E. Senior Professional Associate Supervising Transportation Engineer Presentation to ACEC/ODOT April 15, 2008

2 Overview What is a Road Diet Road Diet Handbook –Case Studies –Feasibility Factors –Design Guidelines

3 Road Diet Concept Lane Reduction Four-to-two lane conversion Benefits to all modes of transportation –Improved mobility and access –Improved livability and quality of life –Economic and community goals Photo simulation by Todd Boulanger, COV

4 Road Diet Concept Safety benefits –Reduced vehicle speeds –Reduced conflict points –Improved sight distance - Improved pedestrian & bike safety Graphics by PB

5 Road Diet Concept Minimal effect on capacity ADT thresholds Traffic diversion 2-15 percent Photo by James Hencke, PB

6 Road Diet Concept Simple as re-striping Cost-effective Optional enhancements Enhances environment Photo by GB Arrington, PB Photo by James Hencke, PB

7 Road Diet Concept Other Road Diet Examples –One-way streets –Three to two lanes –Six to five lanes

8 Road Diet Handbook: Setting Trends by Livable Streets Foreword Acknowledgments 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Previous Studies 3.0 Case Studies 4.0 Road Diet Guidelines Appendices References Graphic Courtesy of PB PBs commitment to Sustainability

9 Road Diet Case Studies Vancouver, Washington Clear Lake, Iowa Athens, Georgia Toronto, Canada Dunedin, New Zealand Graphic Courtesy of PB

10 Livability Survey Purpose – examine livability impacts Survey modeled from Livable Streets –Street perceptions including traffic, safety, comfort –Street life activities –Reactions Survey medium varied Photo by GB Arrington, PB

11 Road Diet Case Studies Fourth Plain Boulevard in Vancouver, Washington –Arterial ~ 17,000 ADT –Re-striping project in 2002 –Bike lanes –ADA ramps & utilities –Improved safety, mobility and access for all users Photo credits: Todd Boulanger, COV Before After

12 Road Diet Case Studies Fourth Plain Boulevard in Vancouver, Washington –Crashes 52 % –Traffic speeds 18 % –No traffic diversion –Pedestrian & bike benefits –Redevelopment and renovations –Measured economic growth –Easier to cross street –Street feels safer –67% Yes, 21% Maybe, 12% No Photo credits: Todd Boulanger, COV Before After

13 Road Diet Case Studies Baxter Street in Athens, Georgia –Arterial ~ ADT 20,000 –Safety Demonstration Project in 1999 –Re-striping –Bike lanes –Transit corridor Photo credits: David Clark, Athens-Clarke County, GA After Before

14 Road Diet Case Studies Baxter Street in Athens, Georgia –Overall crashes 53 % and at unsignalized locations 60% –Traffic Diversion ~ 4% –Easier to cross street –Slower speeds –Home and business improvements –Perceived number of lanes and street width is "just right" –47% Yes, 33% Maybe, 20% No Photo credits: David Clark, Athens-Clarke County, GA After Before

15 Road Diet Case Studies Kaikorai Valley Road in Dunedin, New Zealand –Arterial ~ 10,000 ADT –2003 conversion –4 to 2 lanes with CTL/median –Cycle lanes and landscaping –Exist Parking –Project length ~ 2.4 km (1.5 mi) Photo credits: Ron Minnema, Traffic Engineer, Dunedin City Council

16 Road Diet Case Studies Kaikorai Valley Road, Dunedin, NZ

17 Road Diet Case Studies Kaikorai Valley Road in Dunedin, New Zealand –Crashes 30 % –Pedestrians and bicyclists –No traffic diversion –Perceived # of lanes and street width "just right" –Home and business improvements –42% Yes, 31% Maybe, 27% No Photo credits: Ron Minnema, Traffic Engineer, Dunedin City Council

18 Road Diet Case Studies US 18 in Clear Lake, Iowa –State Highway ~ 12,000 ADT –Re-striping project in 2003 –4 to 2 lanes with TWLTL –Extra width – shoulders –Highway through town Photos by Jennifer Rosales, PB

19 Road Diet Case Studies US 18 in Clear Lake, Iowa –Crashes 65 % –Aggressive speeding 52% –Adequate traffic operation & good mobility –Mixed perceptions - striping confusing –Livability benefits still to be realized Photos by Jennifer Rosales, PB

20 Road Diet Case Studies St. George Street in Toronto, Canada –Minor Arterial ~ ADT 7,500 –Through University campus –Two project phases 93 & 96 –Cycle lanes, on-street parking, wider sidewalks, urban landscaping –Alternate paving materials Photos by Jennifer Rosales, PB

21 Road Diet Case Studies

22 St. George Street in Toronto, Canada –Crashes 40 % –Pedestrians and bicycles –No traffic diversion –Easier to cross street –Perceived slower speeds, "feels safer, perceived increase in pedestrians and bicyclists –81% Yes, 12% Maybe, 6% No Photos by Jennifer Rosales, PB

23 Road Diet Example – Tacoma Street, Portland Curb Extensions Refuge Islands ADT 30,000 4 lanes to 2 lanes with center turn lane On-street parking

24 Traffic Diversion – minimal Peak hour traffic- spread Overall Traffic Speeding Decreased Increased parking Improved pedestrian environment Before After Road Diet Example – Tacoma Street, Portland

25 Road Diet Handbook: Setting Trends by Livable Streets Foreword Acknowledgments 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Previous Studies 3.0 Case Studies 4.0 Road Diet Guidelines Appendices References Graphic Courtesy of PB

26 Road Diet Guidelines – Identification and Evaluation Feasibility Factors –Roadway Function and Environment –Overall Traffic Volume and Level of Service –Turning Volumes and Patterns –Frequent-Stop and Slow- Moving Vehicles (Agriculture, Buses, Buggies) Reference: Knapp, Keith and K. Giese, Guidelines for the Conversion of Urban Four-Lane Undivided Roadways to Three-Lane Two-Way Left-Turn Lane Facilities Final Report, Iowa State University, April 2001.

27 Road Diet Guidelines – Identification and Evaluation Feasibility Factors, cont. –Weaving, Speed, and Queues –Crash Types and Patterns –Pedestrian and Bicycle Activity –Right-of-Way Availability, Cost, and Acquisition Impacts –Presence of Parallel Routes –Other Contextual Considerations Reference: Knapp, Keith and K. Giese, Guidelines for the Conversion of Urban Four-Lane Undivided Roadways to Three-Lane Two-Way Left-Turn Lane Facilities Final Report, Iowa State University, April 2001.

28 Design Guidelines and Concepts Traveled Way Suggested Left-Turn Treatments Transitions Bicycle Facilities On-Street Parking Pedestrian Realm Graphic Reference: MUTCD, Federal Highway Administration, 2003.

29 Typical Road Diet Cross-Sections Graphics Courtesy of PB

30 Traffic Calming and Roundabout Options Pavement texturing/coloring Curb extensions Medians Landscaping Street trees Narrow streets On-street parking Chicanes Chokers Raised crosswalks Raised intersections Diagonal diverters Selective enforcement Photo by Jennifer Rosales, PB

31 Green Street Options/Enhancements Street Trees Reduced Imperviousness Permeating or Eliminating Curb and Gutter Vegetative Filter Strips Swales Linear Detention Basin Infiltration Trench Infiltration Basin Solar Photos by Jennifer Rosales, PB

32 Pavement reconstruction project or jurisdictional transfer Other supporting conditions such as parallel route Consider community requests Tech evaluation and community involvement – keys to success Pilot project study With other corridor improvements With concurrent pavement overlay projects. Planning

33 Implementing Public Education Manage community expectations Consider focus groups, workshops, open houses Consider traffic calming Consider greening Include access management strategies Address key intersection operations Repair sidewalks and ramps Police enforcement

34 Road Diets - Summary Meet transportation need Safety benefits Livability Benefits Asset to the community Compatible with the environment Cost-effective Better than Before

35 Contact Information Jennifer A. Rosales, P.E. PB


Download ppt "Road Diets Jennifer A. Rosales, P.E. Senior Professional Associate Supervising Transportation Engineer Presentation to ACEC/ODOT April 15, 2008."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google