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40 Call to Action: Sustaining FCS ED with Healthy Lifestyle: Obesity Prevention Janet F. Laster, Ph.D. Sandra Laurenson, M.S. OAFCS Public Policy Co-Chairs Kelly Schulz, M.ED. OAFCS & OATFACS Board Member . Note to presenters: This power point presentation is designed to be used with school and community audiences, e.g., faith communities, civic organizations, AAUW, Habitat for Humanity, Food Pantries. Select slides to best meet interests and needs of organization. The following sub-sets can be used separately of together: 1. FCS and AAFCS branding slides (3 slides): Use to introduce yourself and how FCS can address obesity issue. 2. Obesity Issue (18 slides): Includes trends Replace Ohio affiliate/AAFCS logo with your state affiliate/AAFCS logo. Use/adapt these slides for your own presentations, i.e., add your name, position, etc. to this slide. Share your connection to FCS, i.e., teacher, teacher educator, member of AAFCS, etc. Make changes throughout the slide set to personalize the slides for your context. For example, replace Ohio data with data for your state and/or county on slide #4. For data, see

41 FCS’s Call to Action: In 2010 and now
School districts, facing inadequate funding, reduce or eliminate FCS programs Public’s lack of FCS name recognition and far-reaching effects . In 2010 Sandy Laurenson, retired State Department of Education Supervisor, and Janet Laster, as OAFCS Public Policy Chairs, became more and more alarmed at the increasing numbers of schools districts reducing or eliminating FCS programs due to inadequate funding. As Public Policy chairs, we had facilitated a state advocacy effort to ensure that FCS would be recognized as a provider of the Financial Literacy requirement. We felt we needed to do something to sustain our programs throughout the state and felt called to action.

42 FCS’s Call to Action: Source: Bipartison Policy Center, June 2012
In 2010 and now Obesity Crisis in Ohio: Obesity rate currently 29.8%. Obesity Crisis in US: - 2/3 Americans are overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 30) - 1/3 children are overweight or obese (≥ 95%) Increasing obesity-related chronic diseases Obesity-related chronic diseases driving up personal, healthcare, and national debt Source: Bipartison Policy Center, June 2012 . We alarmed by the obesity crisis in Ohio and throughout the US and felt, as FCS professionals, we were ethically and morally obligated to act.

43 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults: Dramatic Increase in 20 Years
(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person) 1990 2000 2010 Visuals like this are alarming. Ohio, at 29.8% , is almost in the upper level of obesity: >30% No Data <10% %–14% %–19% %–24% %–29% ≥30%

44 Epidemic of overweight and obesity
64% of women 72% of men In 2008, about 1/3 of adults were obese; 72% of men & 64% of women were overweight or obese Centers for Disease Control What is the percentage today?

45 Over last 30 years, rates of obesity (BMI >30) in US more than doubled for adults and more than tripled for children Over the last 30 years, rates of obesity in US has more than doubled for adults and more than tripled for children—resulting in unhealthy individuals and families with high healthcosts.

46 What are the percentages today?
Trends Increasing Weight – Decreasing Health Obese children aged 6-11: % in 1980 to 20% in 2008 Adolescents aged 12-19: % in 1980 to 18% in 2008 2010 Centers for Disease Control What are the percentages today? In Ohio? In your county? One third of Americans are overweight or obese, with child obesity rates tripling over the last three decades to one-third. Risk of adult obesity increases: 25% chance as preschooler 40% at age 7 75% at age 12 90% as teenager Risk factors for adult chronic diseases increasingly found in younger ages

47 Definitions: Weight Groups
Adult (BMI*): Underweight: BMI less than 18.5 kg/m2 Healthy weight: BMI between kg/m2 Overweight: BMI between kg/m2 Obese: BMI equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2 * BMI (Body Mass Index) measurement: Divide weight (in kilograms) by height (in meters) squared: kg/m2 Source: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 Essentially, obesity is weighing approximately 30 pounds above an adult’s healthy weight. Direct them to their worksheet where they can find their height and weight and determine their BMI. There are links at the end of the PowerPoint for your own use and use in the classroom to help student calculate the BMI if you are interested.

48 Long Term Health Costs According to the 2011 Center for Disease Control Obese Children are likely to have Many types of cancers – thyroid, ovary, esophagus, kidney, gall bladder, prostate Type 2 diabetes with more complications earlier than adults Cardiovascular disease – high cholesterol, high blood pressure Stroke Osteoarthritis Bone and joint problems

49 Obesity Crisis: Private and Public Policy Issue
Family/Public health crisis and National economic crisis: - Affects all segments of society: Adults, children; rich, poor - Long-term budget issue - Bipartisan issue Source: Bipartisan Policy Center

50 Help REVERSE causes of obesity…
FCS’s Call to Action: Help REVERSE causes of obesity… Change in food supply “Obesgenic environment”: home, community Inactive lifestyles Unhealthy eating habits and Lack of food preparation skills Because obesity is caused by factors that FCS professionals are concerned with, we need to do something to help make a difference. But how?

51 Dr. Alice Lichtenstein: “Bring back Home Economics”
Ohio’s and US’s Call to Action: Dr. Alice Lichtenstein: “Bring back Home Economics” Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) editorial . An editorial in the JAMA by Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, “Bring back Home Economics” gave me hope. If medical and nutrition communities think FCS should be in schools to help with the obesity crisis, they can be our advocates. However, it was discouraging to realize this professional at Tufts University did not know that Home Economics was in the schools—but as Family and Consumer Sciences.

52 Dr. Alice Lichtenstein of Tufts University, at the
“Providing a mandatory food preparation curriculum to students throughout the country may be among the best investments society could make [to reduce health care expenditures]”. Dr. Alice Lichtenstein of Tufts University, at the Youth Obesity Prevention Summit sponsored by the FCS Alliance member: Board on Human Sciences See “Point of View Obesity Prevention Summit: Positive Change Seen” Carolyn W. Jackson, AAFCS Executive DirectorWinter 2012 Journal of FCS A recent quote by Dr. Lichtenstein provides a positive economic reason supporting FCS programs in school worthy to be included in advocacy letters.

53 Sustain Family and Consumer Sciences Education
2010 OAFCS Resolutions: Sustain Family and Consumer Sciences Education Healthy Weight - Obesity Prevention Not independent but interdependent Public Policy  Resolutions With these needs, two public policy resolutions were approved by OAFCS in 2010 and sent to AAFCS for their approval and promotion throughout US.

54 FCS’s Public Policy Goals
Sustain FCS Education FCS’s Public Policy Goals Promote name recognition of “Family and Consumer Sciences” and understanding of scope of FCS and its relevance to serious societal concerns today such as obesity, food safety, financial literacy… Support and facilitate…national, state, and local intervention strategies to sustain FCS Education in current economic and education environment These resolutions reflect FCS’s public policy goals to sustain FCS Education in Ohio and US. Five public policy goals are reflected in the resolutions.

55 Healthy Weight-Lifestyle Initiative: Obesity Prevention
FCS’s Public Policy Intervention Goals Collaborate with nutrition science, medicine, education, policy makers and others to advocate healthy lifestyles and nutrition education and garner support for FCS Education in MS, HS, Extension programs Utilize opportunities within range of influence and practice to promote national obesity prevention and nutrition education in public schools and communities “Take Obesity Prevention to Streets!”

56 Healthy Lifestyle - Obesity Prevention: National CALLS for Action
2010 First Lady Michelle Obama’s Dr. Lichtenstein’s “Bring back Home Economics Education” in JAMA, May 12, 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, p. 58 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (PL ) signed into law Institute of Medicine Report, May 8, 2012 Bipartisan Policy Center Report, June 6, 2012 We are not alone in our call to action: In 2010 First Lady Michelle Obama’s called for Americans to “Move to Raise a Healthier Generation of Kids.” Dr. Lichtenstein continues to call for us to be returned to our nation’s schools as does the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (see Ch. 6, p. ). The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 issued the first “call to action” with public policy recommendations that includes ‘providing comprehensive health, nutrition, and physical education programs in educational settings, and place special emphasis on food preparation and food safety skills. As FCS Educators, we are being called to ‘provide this comprehensive health and nutrition education…with special emphasis on food preparation and food safety skills.” The lastest calls for action by IOM and Bipartisan Policy Center urge each of us need to take responsibility and leadership “as individuals, parents, communities, and key institutions, including government and organizations” to reduce and prevent obesity—to take up the mantra “If it’s to be, it’s up to me!” First Lady Obama set the example for each of us for taking responsibility and leadership for improving America’s health—wherever we are. As educators, we especially need to partner with the Institute for Medicine and help achieve 5 goals to “accelerate progress in obesity prevention, including Goal 5, “Strengthen schools as the heart of health.” And the Bipartisan Policy Center Report, Lots to Lose: How America’s Health and Obesity Crisis Threatens our Economic Future, call for each American to accept “responsibility and leadership in combating obesity and chronic diseases as individuals, parents, communities, and key institutions, including government and organizations.”

57 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010
CALL TO ACTION: Individual (and Family) behavior change: Nutrient-dense food and physical activity to promote health and disease prevention Nutrition Policy and Strategies change, e.g.: Guiding Principles (pp for Strategies) Ensure all Americans have access to nutritious foods & opportunities for physical activity Facilitate individual behavior change through environmental strategies Set the stage for lifelong healthy eating, physical activity, & weight management behaviors The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, for the first time are based on most recent scientific evidence and for health promotion and disease prevention. They also form the basis for nutrition policy in Federal food, education, and information programs. The public policy change recommendations have already resulted in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and school lunch and other food related school policies. Two strategies recommended for setting the stage of lifelong healthy eating and weight management that have implications for FCS programs are to (1) “ensure that all meals and snacks sold and served in schools and childcare and early childsettings are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines” and (2) “provide comprehensive health, nutrition…education in educational settings…with special emphasis on food preparation skills (and) food safety…”

58 Recommended Public Policy Strategies
Principle: Set the stage for lifelong healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management Recommended Policy Strategies (DGFA2010, p. 58): Ensure that all meals and snacks sold and served in schools…childcare…early childhood settings are consistent with Dietary Guidelines Provide comprehensive health, nutrition, physical education in educational settings …special emphasis on food preparation skills, food safety…”

59 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010
Authorizes funding and sets policy for USDA’s core programs: National School Lunch, School Breakfast, WIC, Summer Food Service, Child and Adult Care Food Programs Allows opportunity, for first time in 30 years, for real reforms to school lunch and breakfast programs by improving safety net for millions of children Source: USDA.gov

60 Institute of Medicine: Call to Action
Accelerate Obesity Prevention with 5 Goals: Integrate physical activity every day in every way. Market what matters for a healthy life. Make healthy foods and beverages available everywhere. Activate employers and health care professionals. Strengthen schools as the of health. “…accomplishing any one of these might help speed up progress in preventing obesity, but together, their effects will be reinforced, amplified, and maximized.” Institute of Medicine The IOM’s goals for accelerating obesity prevention also have implications for all that is done in FCS classrooms and programs. Especially goals 2, 3, and 5.

61 Bipartisan Policy Center: Call to Action
All assume leadership & responsibility for change & action: Healthy families: Develop federal dietary guidelines for all children under six, all nutrition assistance programs reflect dietary guidelines, promote breastfeeding Healthy schools: Improve nutrition & physical activity Healthy workplaces: Develop workplace wellness programs Healthy communities: Central role in lifestyle choices 1. Community-based, prevention-focused Health Care 2. Large institutions: Serve healthier foods & lead by example 3. Community programs and built environment: Families and local governments expand physical activity opportunities and promote active living Bipartisan Policy Center’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Initiative (NPAI) challenges all Americans to assume personal leadership and responsibility for turning the tide of the obesity epidemic in our country—because we have twin challenges: (1) behaviors rooted in our culture are difficult to change, and (2) public resources are constrained for new policies and new programs. Estimated that if mothers would breastfeed their babies until 6 months of age, $90 billion would be saved per year.

62 The Time is Right. WE Can Make a Difference!
Within our state and national “RUBBLE” of increasing obesity, disease risk, healthcare costs, and national debt, FCS can find and use our “GOLDEN RING of opportunity” to partner with others in our communities to prevent obesity and sustain FCS Education in our schools.

63 Sustaining FCS Education + Healthy Lifestyles-Obesity Prevention = Synergy
Ohio’s Action Plan Goals: FCS Professionals… Use FCS branding resources:  click on FCS logo Provide resources on OAFCS, OATFACS, AAFCS websites for updating, public policy advocacy, and community presentations Align FCS curriculum, strategies & public image Become active advocates for public policy supporting healthy lifestyles and FCS ED Initiate/Participate in community healthy lifestyle initiatives Create individual Leadership Action Plan

64 MOST IMPORTANT: Health Centered
Health for every age, body shape, and size: Health-centered NOT Weight-centered Healthy food choices and food preparation Healthy eating in response to internal body cues: Hunger Relaxed eating Social, emotional, spiritual & physical factors contributing to health & happiness Dieting ineffectiveness & dangers Whatever we do, in classrooms and community, should be health centered; not weight-centered.

65 Key Message: Policy Makers
POLICY ACTION: PLEASE Ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (formerly home economics) Education programs are in every middle and high school and community in our state REASONS To develop the essential life skills needed to address our complex obesity-related crisis: nutrition, food selection and preparation, parenting, personal and family finance, and career planning skills.

66 What has been done nationally?
OAFCS Public Policy Resolutions adopted by AAFCS in 2011 FCS Coalition developed FCS brief, Empowering Individuals and Families: Obesity Prevention, for FCS professionals to use with policy makers, public AAFCS and Let’s Move! partnership formed: FCS Coalition used FCS brief with First Lady Michelle Obama and staff AAFCS Obesity Prevention Community formed: JOIN! Note to Presenters:

67 What has been done in Ohio?
FCS Education Promotion Task Force formed: Supervisors, Teachers, Teacher Educators OAFCS Annual Conference: Resolution Support Keynote: Dr. Cheryl Achterberg, OSU Dean and Advisory Committee Member for DGFA Obesity Prevention Projects: Extension, United Way, Action for Healthy Kids, Dairy Council Professional Development Workshop: District B Additional workshops planned in other Districts Resources developed/adapted for OAFCS, OATFACS and AAFCS Websites Note to Presenters:

68 What Should We Do ? How should we answer the call for “All to assume leadership and responsibility for change and action to prevent obesity”? What should we do individually? As parents? Grandparents? What should we do professionally—in workplace? What should we do as community members? Bipartisan Policy Center’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Initiative (NPAI) challenges all Americans to assume personal leadership and responsibility for turning the tide of the obesity epidemic in our country—because we have twin challenges: (1) behaviors rooted in our culture are difficult to change, and (2) public resources are constrained for new policies and new programs.

69 Responsibility-Leadership Action Plan to help make America healthy
Community- related Action Individual/ Family Action Classroom- School Action What will you do?

70 Next Steps: Individually
Use resources to become more nutritionally and public policy literate - Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 - Report of Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee - Nutrition Action Healthletter (Center for Public Interest) - Call to Action: Healthy Lifestyle Comparison Chart - Obesity causes, consequences Other steps—individually? in family? Lifelong learning is required for nutrition and public policy development. Like medicine, nutrition is a very young science and we are in the beginning years of understanding how our bodies work and what they need and don’t need to be healthy and function efficiently well with quality of life.

71 Next Steps: As FCS Teachers
Become active advocate for policies supporting healthy lifestyles and families, e.g., see Sample policy letter and Talking points and Resources Set the stage for lifelong nutrition learning, healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management, e.g., Align FCS curriculum, strategies, and public image Refine teaching strategies and food labs Initiate/Participate in community healthy lifestyle initiatives Create individual Leadership Action Plan: Individual/Family Plan Workplace Plan Community-related Plan We hope you will consider what you can to become an active advocate for policies supporting healthy lifestyles and families; how you will set the stage for lifelong nutrition learning, healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management; and how you might initiate and/or participate in community healthy lifestyle initiatives. Most of all we hope you create an individual Leadership Action Plan with how you will help make America healthy again.

72 What questions do you have?
Think, Pair, Share What will you need to do to align your curriculum with new dietary guidelines? What will you need to do to refine your teaching strategies to develop healthy food preparation skills? With which community organization, agency might you partner to foster healthy lifestyle? What questions do you have?

73 Call to Action: Refining FCS Curriculum
Align curriculum, strategies & public image Create and promote healthy lifestyles for children (from in utero to 18 years) Appropriate weight gain during pregnancy, breastfeeding for infant and mother to have healthy weight throughout lifetime (NGFA2010, p. 58; Lots to Lose, pp. ) Set the stage for lifelong healthy eating, physical activity & weight management behaviors: Provide comprehensive health, nutrition, & physical educational programs in educational settings with special emphasis on food preparation skills, food safety, and lifelong physical activity (DGFA2010, Ch. 6, p. 58) See other strategies for Setti

74 Call to Action: FCS Teaching
Refine teaching strategies for developing healthy eating & safe food preparation skills Evaluate objectives, eating patterns advocated by example, recipes, and teaching time spent on preparing vegetables, fruit, and whole grains vs refined grain-based desserts and breads Sequence & structure food preparation labs to enjoy preparing food, eating together, developing knifing skills; vegetable, fruit, whole grain, fish, and lean meat and poultry preparation skills; food safety skills Ruth Dohner, OAFCS, 2012

75 Call to Action: Evaluate
Collect data to evaluate FCS program effectiveness Pre-Post unit/course tests Healthy lifestyle project: Pre-post personal assessment of diet, physical activity, and BMI using eating, sleeping, & activity logs per day. Use Super Tracker: Or Also Dairy Council ppts at

76 Call to Action: “Take it to the Streets!”
Participate in community healthy lifestyle initiatives Partner with community agencies, organizations to promote or support healthy lifestyle, e.g., Action for Healthy Kids, United Way, schools, Extension Partner with others to develop personal healthy lifestyle, e.g., teachers, Extension, colleagues, family or friends Advocate supporting FCS Education in MS, HS, and community extension programs

77 My Responsibility-Leadership Action Plan to help make America healthy
Individual/Family Action Community-related Action Monitoring my calories: Eat healthy foods, including 2 ½ cup veggies/day, less than 20 g sugar/day Walk min./day Special fruits, berries as treats for grandchildren Encouraging husband to use whole grain flour Advocacy letter to Ohio legislators & School Board Proposed/organizing Healthy Lifestyle Advisory Committee at church Proposed/organizing Forums at church: 1) Obesity Crisis 2) What should we do to prevent obesity of our children? Ourselves? Note to Presenter: Make changes on slide to represent your personal Action Plan.

78 The Guidelines for a Healthy Lifestyle

79 The Guidelines for a Healthy Lifestyle Start Here because…
Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 Based on most recent scientific evidence summarized in Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 at For health promotion and disease prevention for Americans 2 years old and older Form basis for nutrition policy in Federal food, education, and information programs The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans provide basis for nutritional policy in Federal food, education, and information programs. Based on the most recent scientific evidence, we have one of the most objective documents to guide our personal and community healthy food choices. These 2010 Dietary Guidelines include recommendations for health promotion and disease prevention, including obesity prevention and weight management (p ). How do we teach our students to choose their resources? WE NEED TO FOLLOW THIS (use diet books as evidence of what some of us are using instead of the sound information to help guide their decision making!) Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) grading criteria: Quality of studies Quantity of studies and subjects Consistency of findings across studies Magnitude of the effect or public health impact Generalizability to the population of interest USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion

80 Key Recommendation #1 Balance calories with physical activity to manage weight Prevent and/or reduce overweight and obesity through improved healthy eating & physical activity Control total calorie intake to manage body weight. Consume NUTRIENT DENSE FOODS. Why reduction Why calories from solid fats and added sugars are a particular concern? “Solid fats and added sugars are consumer in excessive amounts, and intake should be limited. Together, they contribute a substantial portion of the calories consumed by Americans—35 percent on average, or nearly 800 calories per day—without contributing importantly to overall nutrient adequacy of the diet…For most people, no more than about 5 to 15 percent of calories from solid fats and added sugars can be reasonably accommodated in the USDA Food Patterns, which are designed to meet nutrient needs within calorie limits” (p. 28, DGFA2010). Why focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods and beverages? “Nutrient-dense foods and beverages provide vitamins, minerals, and other substances that may have positive health effects with relatively few calories…(and) have not been ‘diluted’ by the addition of calories from added solid fats, added sugars, or added refined starches, or by the solid fats naturally present in the food” (p. 5, DGFA2010) What is new and different here are the definition of key words such as: Calorie balance: Balance between calories consumed in foods & beverages and calories expended through physical activity and metabolic processes Eating pattern: Combination of foods & beverages that constitute an individual's complete dietary intake over time Nutrient-dense: Foods providing vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial substances, such as fiber & phytochemicals, with relatively few calories

81 Top Sources of Calories Among Americans 2 Years and Older
Source: NHANES , Available at The top sources of calories have been estimated using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, For this analysis and others like it found in the policy document in pie charts, foods and beverages reported in the survey were grouped into 97 categories. Here the categories were ranked according to calorie contribution to the diet. The number one calorie contributor in the diets of Americans ages 2 years is grain-based desserts, followed by yeast breads, chicken and chicken mixed dishes, soda and energy and sports drinks, and pizza. Although some of these are important sources of nutrients, others provide calories with few nutrients. Many of the foods and beverages most often consumed within these categories are high in solid fats and/or added sugars, thereby contributing excess calories to the diet. For example, grain-based desserts are typically high in added sugars and solid fats; and chicken is often breaded and fried, and that adds a substantial number of calories to the chicken. [Additional information: Total mean intake = 2,157 kcal/d Calories from each of the top 5 sources: Grain-based desserts (138 kcal/d) Yeast breads (129 kcal/d) Chicken and chicken mixed dishes (121 kcal/d) Soda/energy/sports drinks (114 kcal/d) Pizza (98 kcal/d) Source: NHANES , Available at ]

82 How to Put This in Action?
Caloric Balance: Food and Beverage Intake Determine one’s daily calorie needs by monitoring body weight and adjust calorie intake and participation in physical activity based on changes in weight over time. MyFitnessPal or Super Tracker Principles for Weight Management also take these further by stating: Focus on the total number of calories consumed. Monitor and control total caloric intake: Consume fewer calories by replacing foods higher in calories with nutrient-dense foods and beverages relatively low in calories, e.g. vegetables, fruits, and whole grains; non-fat and low-milk and milk products, lean meats and poultry Choose smaller portions or lower-calorie options Prepare, serve, and consumer smaller portions of foods and beverages, especially those high in calories Eat a nutrient-dense breakfast Limit screen time Monitor calories from alcoholic beverages Monitor intake of 100% fruit juices Reduce intake of sugar sweetened beverages’

83 How do I Count Calories if I Don’t Know How to Serve it?
Vegetables – 25 calories: 1 cup raw; ½ cup cooked Fruits – 60 calories: medium size fresh fruit; ½ c. sliced fruit Grains & Starchy Vegetables – 70 calories: ½ cup or slice of bread Lean Protein/Low-Fat Dairy Products – 110 calories: 3 oz. or 1 cup low fat dairy or 1 oz. cheese Fats – 45 calories: 1 teaspoon oil; 1 tablespoon nuts, seeds Sugars – 20 calories: 1 sugar cube; 1 teaspoon sugar Mayo Clinic Diet, 2010

84 Key Recommendation #2 Reduce some foods and food components:
Daily sodium to less than 2,300 mg; or 1,500 mg if 51 or over, African-American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease Solid fats and added sugars (SoFAS) Foods that contain refined grains, especially foods with solid fats, added sugars, and sodium A new key recommendation is to reduce calories from solid fats and added sugars. These two food components together provide over a third of the calories in the diets of Americans, while contributing very little in the way of nutrients. Intake of these food components replaces nutrient-dense foods, and makes it very difficult to achieve recommended nutrient levels. In fact, only 5 to 15% of calories from SoFAS can be accommodated in diets that are nutritionally adequate and within calorie limits, so a dramatic reduction is called for.

85 Focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods
Key Recommendations #3 Focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods Variety of vegetables, especially dark-green, red, and orange vegetables, beans, peas Whole grains: Replace refined grains with whole grains—at least half Variety of protein foods: seafood (8-oz. per week), lean meat and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts and seeds The third recommendation focuses on increasing foods and nutrients that should be emphasized to ensure nutrient adequacy, reduce disease risk, and promote overall good health. Because consumption of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, and seafood is lower than recommended, intake by Americans of some nutrients is low enough to be of public health concern. These are potassium, dietary fiber, calcium, and vitamin D. Potassium can lower blood pressure by blunting the adverse effects of sodium on blood pressure, reduce risk of developing kidney stones, and decrease bone loss. Dietary sources of potassium are found in all food groups, notably in vegetables, fruits, and milk and milk products. Dietary fiber naturally occurs in plants, especially in beans and peas: navy beans, split peas, lentils, pinto beans, and black beans. Additional sources include other vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and nuts. Calcium is necessary for bone health, nerve transmission, constriction and dilation of blood vessels, and muscle contraction. Age groups of concern include children ages 9 years and older, adolescent girls, adult women, and adults ages 51 and older. Calcium in some plant foods is well absorbed but consuming enough plant foods to achieve the RDA may be unrealistic for many without milk and milk products or fortified foods. Americans should select a variety of food choices rather than relying on supplements for these nutrients. Adequate vitamin D can help reduce risk of bone fractures, rickets in children, osteomalacia (softening of bones) in adults, and possibly help prevent type 2 diabetes. Because of limited dietary vitamin D, in fortified foods such as milk and some yogurts, breakfast cereals, margarine, orange juice, and soy beverages, and naturally in some fish (e.g., salmon, herring, mackerel, and tuna) and egg yolk, dietary supplements are available. RDAs for vitamin D, which assume limited sun exposure, are 600 IU (15 mcg) per day for children and most adults and 800 IU (20 mcg) for adults older than 70 years. Potential risk of adverse effects increases if intake increases above 4000 IU (100 mcg). Additional nutrients of concern for specific groups: Iron for women capable of becoming pregnant, including adolescent girls, and women who are pregnant; Folic for women capable of becoming pregnant; Vitamin B12 for Americans ages 50 years and older who may have reduced ability to absorb naturally occcurring vitamin B12 (p DGFA2010.

86 Nutrient-dense foods retain naturally occurring components, such as dietary fiber

87 Nutrient-Dense Foods All vegetables, fruits, whole grains, eggs,
seafood, beans and peas, unsalted nuts and seeds, fat-free and low-fat dairy, lean meats and poultry are nutrient-dense when prepared without solid fats or sugars This figure illustrates the concept of nutrient-dense foods comparing a baked form of chicken with a breaded and fried form. Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 4.1.

88 Nutrient-Dense vs. Not Nutrient-Dense
This figure illustrates the concept of nutrient-dense foods comparing a baked form of chicken with a breaded and fried form. Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 4.1.

89 Nutrient-Dense vs. Not Nutrient-Dense
This figure illustrates the concept of nutrient-dense foods comparing a baked form of chicken with a breaded and fried form. Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 4.1.

90 Nutrient-Dense vs. Not Nutrient-Dense
This figure illustrates the concept of nutrient-dense foods comparing a baked form of chicken with a breaded and fried form. Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 4.1.

91 Key Recommendation #4 Build healthy eating pattern to meet
nutrient needs over time at appropriate calorie level, e.g., DASH, Mediterranean-style Focus on nutrient-dense foods Remember: Beverages count Nutrients should come from food

92

93 Let’s Get Started

94 Responsibility-Leadership Action Plan to help make America healthy
Classroom School Action Community- Related Action Individual / Family Action What will you do?

95 In Summary

96 Three Nutrition Points to Put in Your Back Pocket!
This is the time to ADOPT a healthy lifestyle NOT a band aid. Any “diet” can be healthy and unhealthy. Calories are to be respected! Enough said – quit reading the lose it quick books and buying the supplements – get back to basics and move, eat, and get enough sleep! All diets have their pros and cons. It is about you as an INDIVIDUAL. Vegetarians are great if they eat clean – barely processed fruits and veggies, whole wheat grains. But MANY eat processed foods (processed proteins “substitutes”) and little fruits and vegetables. To make their processed selections taste better they use lots of sauces and fats! Calories are the true item if we are concerned about weight. In’s and Outs’ just like what a nurse in the hospital records for drinks and urination are what we need to do with our calories each day. Remember EVERYONE IS DIFFERENT – different body types and different metabolisms. Learn portion sizes and the correct amount of calories.

97 You Pick Three! Pick 3 actions from your sheet that you have pondered today Put them into action this year! Report back…… yeah that’s right… report back! Here’s How: Kelly Schulze: Facebook: find Ohio FCS group or friend me – Kelly McNulty Schulze and I will lead the way. Twitter: find me and those around you and stay connected!

98 Additional Resources

99 Internet Resources USDA & USDHHS, Dietary Guidelines for American 2010
See p.59 for Resource List Local data related to obesity: State specific data on health care costs and quality, prevention, insurance coverage, public health, childhood obesity, examples of community creativity, and possible funding source: obesity/

100 Apps that you might find useful
myfitnesspal Get Fit Map

101 Apps that you might find useful
Smash Your Food

102 Internet Resources The Snackwise® Nutrition Rating System All you do is type the information from the nutrition facts label in the Snackwise® Calculator and Snackwise® determines the nutrient density and rates the snack! Snack foods are then rated as either: GREEN: BEST CHOICE; YELLOW: CHOOSE OCCASIONALLY; and, RED: CHOOSE RARELY Nebraska Extension Office: Spending your Calorie Salary and other PowerPoints Alice Henneman, MS, RD, Extension Educator Univerity of Nebraska Extension Services Beverly Benes, PhD, RD, Assistant Director, Nutrition Services Making healthy choices in the middle of our financial crisis is crucial to being responsible role models to our families, communities, and our students.

103 Internet Resources Institute of Medicine’s Report: Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention. Published May8, 2012. Bipartisan Report: Lots to Lose How America’s Health and Obesity Crisis Threatens our Economic Future. Published June 5, 2012 Websites for BMI calculation: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention -http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/ The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Making healthy choices in the middle of our financial crisis is crucial to being responsible role models to our families, communities, and our students.

104 “Everyone has a role in the movement to make America healthy.”
Dietary Guidelines for American, 2010, USDA & HHS “Success is only possible if all…work together and bring creativity, innovation and focused commitment to the effort.” Lots to Lose. Bipartisan Policy Center


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