Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Contaminant Exposure in Marine Foraging River Otters Cait Nelson M. Sc. Candidate Faculty of Land and Food Systems September 24 th 2010.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Contaminant Exposure in Marine Foraging River Otters Cait Nelson M. Sc. Candidate Faculty of Land and Food Systems September 24 th 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Contaminant Exposure in Marine Foraging River Otters Cait Nelson M. Sc. Candidate Faculty of Land and Food Systems September 24 th 2010

2 Coastal River Otters Lontra canadensis

3 Background To investigate the effects of persistent organic pollutants on top predator wildlife species Why is this important? Bioaccumulation and Physiological Effects Population Declines...

4 Why study river otters? Relatively small home ranges Finer scale contamination Do not hibernate or migrate Exposed to pollutants year round Mustelids are sensitive to pollution

5 Top Predator of Marine Based Food Web Maintain System Stability Sentinel Species for Ecosystem Health Why study river otters?

6 How To Study River Otters? Non-Invasive Scat Sampling Communal Latrine Site

7 Previous Research Elliott et al. 2008

8 Fresh faeces at latrine Pooled sample for analysis Latrine = sampling unit Previous Research

9 Vic Esq Nan Pow R.CowClay (1998) Vic Van Cmx (2004) Critical Level (9 mg/kg lw) ΣPCB concentration (mg/kg lw) No Effect Level (4 mg/kg lw) PCBs in feces (geomean & range) (4) (5) (2)(5)(7) (18)(9)(35) (2006) Esq 22.2 Non-hb 14.9 Vic 38.2

10 Assessment of Contaminant Exposure, Diet and Population Metrics of River Otters Along the Coast of Southern Vancouver Island Daniel A. Guertin Masters Thesis Spring 2009 Department of Biological Sciences Simon Fraser University Jared Hobbs

11 Objectives Individual-based Approach 1.Fecal DNA Genotyping 2.Diet composition 3.Track Contaminant levels 4.Spatial relationships Guertin Thesis 2009 Jared Hobbs

12 Study Area Guertin Thesis 2009

13 Methods Winter/Summer 2006 Mapped Active Latrines (80kms) Split scat samples 1.DNA and diet analysis 2.Contaminant analysis Guertin Thesis 2009

14 Methods Guertin Thesis 2009 DNA Analysis 1. Screened samples Diet Analysis 2. Fecal DNA Genotyping -Molecular fingerprints (8 microsatellite loci) University of Wyoming, Dr. Merav Ben-David

15 Methods Contaminant Analysis 15 OC-pesticides (by class) -DDT and metabolites (ΣDDT) -Chlorobenzenes (ΣClBz) -Chlordane compounds (ΣCHLR) -Hexachlorocyclohexanes (ΣHCH) -Total pesticides (ΣPest) 39 PCB Congeners -Total PCBs (ΣPCBs) DDT ClBz Chlordane HCH PCB

16 Results DNA Analysis -Low genotyping success (12%)... -Successfully genotyped 49 individual otters -28 individuals with >2 samples (65 samples) -Only these samples were analyzed for diet and contaminants Jared Hobbs

17 Gunnels Sculpins Pricklebacks Toadfish Clingfish Flatfish Snailfish Greenlings Crustaceans Prey item Frequency of occurrence in faeces (%) Harbours Non-Harbours Fecal Diet Analysis Guertin Thesis 2009

18 * Gunnels Sculpins Pricklebacks Toadfish Clingfish Flatfish Snailfish Greenlings Crustaceans Prey item Frequency of occurrence in faeces (%) Toadfish Harbours Non-Harbours Harbours Guertin Thesis 2009 Fecal Diet Analysis

19 * Gunnels Sculpins Pricklebacks Toadfish Clingfish Flatfish Snailfish Greenlings Crustaceans Prey item Frequency of occurrence in faeces (%) Crustaceans Harbours Non-Harbours Harbours Guertin Thesis 2009 Fecal Diet Analysis

20 ΣDDTΣClBzΣCHLRΣHCHMirexΣPestΣPCBs Concentration (mg/kg lw) winter summer No season effect Contaminants in Feces (by season ) OC-pesticides Compound Guertin Thesis 2009

21 * * * Victoria Esquimalt Non-harbours Location effect ΣDDTΣClBzΣCHLRΣHCHMirexΣPest Contaminants in Feces (by location) Concentration (mg/kg lw) abb abb abb * ΣPCBs a b c OC-pesticides Compound Guertin Thesis 2009

22 Vic Hb Victoria, BC weeks ΣPCBs in otter faeces Critical level: > 9 mg/kg lw No effect level: < 4 mg/kg lw ΣPCBs in otter faeces Critical level: > 9 mg/kg lw No effect level: < 4 mg/kg lw

23 weeks 6.8 ΣPCBs in otter faeces Critical level: > 9 mg/kg lw No effect level: < 4 mg/kg lw ΣPCBs in otter faeces Critical level: > 9 mg/kg lw No effect level: < 4 mg/kg lw Victoria, BC

24 Summary Highest fecal [PCB] in Victoria Harbour The effects of PCB exposure extend beyond Victoria Harbour Scat Sampling + Fecal DNA Genotyping to investigate contaminant exposure, diet in individual otters Low success in Fecal Genotyping (12%) Jared Hobbs

25 weeks Conclusion Variability in fecal PCB levels, Not likely to reflect body burden Limited Understanding Population and Ecosystem Health Jared Hobbs

26 My Research Objectives 1.Home range and movement patterns 2.[PCB] in fat, blood, feces and prey 3.Non-invasive techniques Expand sampling season... Jared Hobbs

27 My Research Methods Home Range and Movement 13 Adult Otters (5F, 8M) Tagged with VHF transmitters Track for 12 months

28 My Research Methods [PCB] in fat, blood, feces and prey High resolution chemical analysis Test bioaccumulation model

29 My Research Methods Non-invasive techniques Scat Sampling (split three ways) 1. DNA 2. Contaminants 3. Stress Hormones Improve Genotyping Success

30 My Research Methods Genetic Data movement (compare to telemetry data) social structure/relatedness population estimate (mark/recapture) Practical applications in management and monitoring contaminated sites Jared Hobbs

31 Thank You! Co-Supervisors: Dr. John Elliott, Environment Canada Dr. Kim Cheng, UBC Avian Research Centre Genetic Data Center: Dr. Carol Ritland BC Ministry of Environment: Dr. Helen Schwantje Field Crew and Volunteers: Shawn Dalman Caeley Thacker and Ruby Kane Daniel Guertin Jared Hobbs

32 Questions?


Download ppt "Contaminant Exposure in Marine Foraging River Otters Cait Nelson M. Sc. Candidate Faculty of Land and Food Systems September 24 th 2010."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google