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Richard Flamio, Eastchester High School. Review of Literature Flexible nesting requirements Litter their habitat with guano and strip trees of their.

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Presentation on theme: "Richard Flamio, Eastchester High School. Review of Literature Flexible nesting requirements Litter their habitat with guano and strip trees of their."— Presentation transcript:

1 Richard Flamio, Eastchester High School

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3 Review of Literature Flexible nesting requirements Litter their habitat with guano and strip trees of their bark for their nests Make environment unsuitable for waderbirds Feed on small fish near the shoreline and are believed to consume juvenile fish

4 DCCOs in the Mississippi Delta consume over $5 million of catfish fingerlings/year and depredation has led to a $25 million profit loss/year Sports fisheries have persecuted cormorants for allegedly decreasing fish populations Egg oiling, shooting, and harassment are controlling techniques Human-Cormorant Conflicts

5 Determining Cormorant Diet In order to determine cormorant diet, otoliths of their regurgitated pellets may be examined Otolith

6 Importance of Study The current study would serve as a basis for future studies done in the Barnegat Bay region of New Jersey in order to aid the research in determining if cormorants affect local fish populations

7 Purpose/ Hypothesis To understand how DCCOs utilize their environment through studying roosting/loafing location preference and flight lines to and from these locations

8 Location Barnegat Bay covers 75 square miles on the eastern seaboard of Southern New Jersey Wide variety of wildlife and a large fishing community Common roosting and loafing location April through October

9 Methods Myers Hole U.S. Coast Guard boats/ commercial fishing boats Along LBI coast Near inlet to ocean Turtle Cove In bays interior Less disruption from boat traffic Pilings Important fishing sites Marsh

10 Birds observed at Myers Hole biweekly from midmorning to early afternoon and at Turtle Cove weekly in early morning All birds in sight were followed with binoculars Travel direction and flock size were recorded for each bird observed arriving or departing

11 Results at Myers Hole 258 birds were observed (Avg. 23 birds/day) 47% moved each day on average 111 flocks were observed (Avg. flock size = 1.2 birds)

12 Myers Hole Flight Line

13 120 birds were observed (Avg. 30 birds/day) 72% moved each day on average 47 flocks observed (Avg. flock size = 1.9 birds) Results at Turtle Cove

14 Turtle Cove Flight Line

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16 Discussion Myers Hole fits the roosting location profile of a smaller, more sedentary population Turtle Cove fit the loafing location profile of having larger, more active numbers More research is needed to solidify if the birds behavior was due to location status

17 Statistical Significance No statistical tests or p-values were needed as all birds in sight were accounted for.

18 Conclusion To understand how DCCOs utilize their environment through studying roosting/loafing location preference and flight lines to and from these locations The research study was highly successful in that flight lines were determined Supports previous research that humans have enhanced cormorant problem by modifying the environment

19 Implications/ Future Research There has been no research to date in this area on cormorants and observations on their activity will help future researchers determine if they have a definite impact on local fisheries Fishermen chose the sites of study so that areas they believed were the sites of human-cormorant conflicts were directly studied Movement patterns may be affected by weather This is a preliminary study and research will continue next year

20 Acknowledgements Colin Grubel, CUNY Graduate Center and Queens College Christian Gorycki, Edward Gruber, Jean-Marie Woods- Ray, Eastchester High School John A. Brancato, Barnegat Bay fisherman My Family and fellow ASRians Dr. John Waldman, Queens College

21 Flight Line Study of Double-crested Cormorants, Preliminary Results Eye Opener Review of Literature Human-Cormorant Conflicts Determining Cormorant Diet Importance of Study Purpose/ Hypothesis Location Methods Methods Flow Chart Results at Myers Hole Myer's Hole Flight Line Results at Turtle Cove Turtle Cove Flight Line Flock Size Graph Discussion Conclusion Implications/ Future Research Acknowledgements

22 My Summer 2011: Myers Hole

23 My Summer 2011: Turtle Cove, my boat, and my beach house


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