Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. 1.Discuss Dietary Guidelines to reduce the risk of developing cancer. What Youll.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. 1.Discuss Dietary Guidelines to reduce the risk of developing cancer. What Youll."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. 1.Discuss Dietary Guidelines to reduce the risk of developing cancer. What Youll Learn 2.Discuss Dietary Guidelines to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. 3.Discuss Dietary Guidelines to reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis.

3 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. 4.Discuss diet recommendations for people with diabetes or hypoglycemia. What Youll Learn 5.Discuss ways to avoid reactions to food allergies and intolerances, including lactose intolerance and celiac disease, and reactions to MSG.

4 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. antioxidant cardiovascular disease atherosclerosis osteoporosis diabetes hypoglycemia food allergy food intolerance Key Terms lactase deficiency celiac disease

5 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Diet and Cancer You can reduce the risk of developing cancer by practicing the following Dietary Guidelines.

6 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet and Cancer Diets high in antioxidants have been associated with decreased rates of esophagus, lung, colon, and stomach cancer. An antioxidant is a substance that protects cells from being damaged by oxidation. Their actions help prevent healthy cells from becoming cancerous cells. Vitamins C, E, and A, and the mineral selenium are antioxidants.

7 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet and Cancer Tips to Reduce the Risk of Cancer Avoid obesity. Being obese increases the risk of developing cancers of the uterus, breast, gallbladder, prostate gland, and colon. Eat several servings and a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fiber-rich foods each day. Especially eat cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower, broccoli, and brussels sprouts. Fruits and vegetables provide antioxidants, and fiber-rich foods reduce the risk of cancers of the colon and rectum.

8 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet and Cancer Tips to Reduce the Risk of Cancer Limit fat intake and the consumption of foods that are smoked, salted, or nitrate cured. Limiting the amount of fat you eat helps reduce the risk of developing cancers of the breast, prostate gland, and colon. Do not drink alcohol as a teen. Alcohol consumption robs the body of vitamins needed for optimal health.

9

10 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Diet and Cardiovascular Disease Cardiovascular disease is a disease of the heart and blood vessels. Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of premature death and disability.

11 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease Limit fat and cholesterol intake. –Cholesterol is a fatlike substance made by the body and found in some foods. –Eating foods that are high in saturated fats and cholesterol may cause plaque to form on artery walls. –Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque deposits on artery walls.

12 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease –An embolism is the blockage of an artery by a clump of material traveling in the bloodstream. If the blockage is in an artery in the brain, a person could have a stroke. If the blockage is in an artery in the heart, a heart attack could occur. A blockage in the lung is called a pulmonary embolism.

13 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease How to Limit Fat Intake Less than 30 percent of total calories per day should come from fat. Limit your intake of cooked lean meat, poultry, and fish to 5 ½ oz per day. Broil, bake, or steam food rather than fry it. Trim fat from meats before cooking. Trim fat from poultry before cooking. Limit your intake of egg yolks; consider using egg substitutes.

14 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease How to Limit Fat Intake Less than 30 percent of total calories per day should come from fat. Limit your intake of high-fat processed meats, such as hot dogs and bologna. Substitute fruits and low-fat yogurt for high-fat desserts. Substitute turkey, such as turkey hot dogs and turkey chili, for red meat.

15 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease How to Limit Fat Intake Less than 30 percent of total calories per day should come from fat. Substitute nonfat or low-fat dairy products for whole-milk dairy products, such as low-fat yogurt for ice cream, skim milk for whole milk, reduced-fat mayonnaise for regular mayonnaise, low-fat or nonfat cheese for regular cheese. Substitute fruits and vegetables for high-fat snacks, such as potato chips.

16 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease Increase your intake of foods and beverages containing antioxidants. –Antioxidants help prevent wear and tear in blood vessels.

17 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease Limit your intake of sodium. –Sodium is a mineral your body needs only in small amounts. The recommended daily allowance of sodium is three grams. –Too much sodium may cause some people to retain body fluid and, as a result, have increased blood pressure. –You can limit your sodium intake by eating fresh foods rather than canned foods.

18 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease Include flax, soy, canola, olive, and fish oils in your diet. –The unsaturated fats in these foods can help: prevent heart disease, lower bad cholesterol (LDL), and increase good cholesterol (HDL).

19 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Cardiovascular Disease A 2002 Nurses Health Study found an inverse relationship between fish consumption, omega-3 fatty acids, and coronary heart disease (CHD). The more fish women ate, the lower their risk of CHD was. The percentages on the graph represent reduced risk.

20

21 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Diet and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone tissue. Osteoporosis causes bones to fracture easily, and is a major cause of disability in females. Females are ten times more likely to have severe osteoporosis than are males.

22 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet and Osteoporosis Calcium and phosphorus form the hard substance in bone. –Calcium is a mineral that is essential to bone growth. –A deficiency of calcium, especially in females, increases the risk for osteoporosis. –Obtaining enough calcium during adolescence is critical to reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

23 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet and Osteoporosis Other ways to avoid osteoporosis –Other ways to help prevent osteoporosis include: Engage in weight-bearing exercise. Avoid smoking. Utilize bone density testing and medications when appropriate.

24 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet and Osteoporosis Bone loss –In both men and women, bone mass usually peaks between the ages of 25 and 35. –For women, an average bone loss before menopause is 1–1.25 percent per year, but it increases to 3–4 percent after menopause.

25 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet and Osteoporosis Heart disease and hormonal replacement –A womans estrogen production is reduced when she reaches menopause; thus, the body cannot use calcium effectively and the result is an increased risk of osteoporosis. –Recent studies claim that hormonal replacement therapy increases the risk for heart disease, stroke, and cancer in women.

26 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Diet, Diabetes, and Hypoglycemia Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease in which the body produces little or no insulin, or cannot properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the blood sugar level. Without treatment, a person with diabetes will have a high blood sugar level.

27 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet, Diabetes, and Hypoglycemia Dealing with Diabetes –A physician and a dietitian can work with someone who has diabetes to make a plan that may include: Eating more complex carbohydrates and protein Limiting simple carbohydrate intake Eating six small meals a day Having regular exams to test blood sugar levels and re-evaluate diet Maintaining desirable weight

28 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet, Diabetes, and Hypoglycemia Who is at risk? –A lack of physical activity and obesity greatly increase the risk for diabetes. –Early signs of diabetes include frequent urination, excessive thirst, cravings for sweets, and weakness.

29 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet, Diabetes, and Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia –Hypoglycemia is a condition in which there is too much insulin in the body, causing the blood sugar level to be low. –People with hypoglycemia experience a rapid increase in blood sugar when eating, followed by a sudden drop. –When their blood sugar level drops, they feel dizzy, weak, irritable, and confused.

30 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Diet, Diabetes, and Hypoglycemia Guidelines for People with Hypoglycemia People with hypoglycemia follow a diet similar to people who have diabetes and may follow the same guidelines: Eat complex carbohydrates and protein to provide long- lasting energy. Limit the amounts of sweets. Simple sugars increase blood sugar and the need for insulin. Eat six small meals a day to maintain a constant blood sugar level. Have regular examinations to test blood sugar levels and re-evaluate diet. Maintain a desirable weight.

31 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Food Allergies and Intolerances A food allergy is an abnormal response to food that is triggered by the immune system. Food allergies can cause severe illness or even death.

32 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Food Allergies and Intolerances Food Allergies –The most common foods that cause allergic reactions in adults are shellfish, peanuts, fish, and eggs. –Symptoms of food allergies include: diarrhea, swelling, sneezing, itching, and nausea. Symptoms

33 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Food Allergies and Intolerances Food Intolerances A food intolerance is an abnormal response to food that is not caused by the immune system. This merely means that a food is not tolerated well.

34 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Food Allergies and Intolerances Food Intolerances Lactase deficiency –Lactase deficiency is a condition in which lactase, an enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar present in the cells of the small intestine, is missing. –This condition results in the inability to digest lactose and is called lactose intolerance.

35 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Food Allergies and Intolerances Food Intolerances Celiac disease –Celiac disease is a condition in which a person is intolerant to gluten. –Gluten is a part of wheat, rye, barley, and certain other grains.

36 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. What to Know About Food Allergies and Intolerances Food Intolerances MSG –Monosodium glutamate (MSG), a flavor enhancer added to many foods, is a common cause of food intolerance. –Sulfites added to foods also may cause food intolerance.

37 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Study Guide 1.Match the following terms and definitions. ___ atherosclerosis ___ antioxidant ___ osteoporosis ___ hypoglycemia ___ embolism A. a disease in which the density of bone decreases B. a substance that protects cells from being damaged by oxidation C. a condition in which there is too much insulin in the body, causing the blood sugar level to be low D. a disease in which plaque deposits on artery walls E.a blockage of an artery by a clump of material traveling in the bloodstream D B A C E

38 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Study Guide 2.Identify the following statements as true or false. _______ Vitamin A is an antioxidant. _______ The recommended daily allowance of sodium is 30 grams. _______ People with hypoglycemia experience a rapid decrease in blood sugar followed by a slow rise. _______ Complex carbohydrates provide long-lasting energy. true false true

39 Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. Study Guide 3.How do antioxidants help decrease the risk of cancer? An antioxidant protects cells from being damaged by oxidation. By preventing cell damage and repairing damaged cells, they prevent healthy cells from becoming cancerous cells.

40 End of the Lesson

41 Lesson Resources Interactive Tutor Web Links Self-Check Quiz Go to to find Health & Wellness Web resources.www.glencoe.com

42 To navigate within this Interactive Chalkboard product: Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Lesson Resources button to go to the Lesson Resources slide where you can access resources, such as transparencies, that are available for the lesson. Click the Menu button to close the lesson presentation and return to the Main Menu. If you opened the lesson presentation directly without using the Main Menu, this will exit the presentation. You also may press the Escape key [Esc] to exit and return to the Main Menu. Click the Help button to access this screen. Click the Health Online Button to access the Web page associated with the particular lesson you are working with. Click the Speaker button to hear the vocabulary term and definition when available. Help

43 This slide is intentionally blank.


Download ppt "Click the mouse button or press the space bar to display information. 1.Discuss Dietary Guidelines to reduce the risk of developing cancer. What Youll."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google