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DIET: Decentralised Information Ecosystem Technologies Paul Marrow Intelligent Systems Laboratory.

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Presentation on theme: "DIET: Decentralised Information Ecosystem Technologies Paul Marrow Intelligent Systems Laboratory."— Presentation transcript:

1 DIET: Decentralised Information Ecosystem Technologies Paul Marrow Intelligent Systems Laboratory

2 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 2 DIET: Some history At BT, involved in development of applications drawing inspiration from nature since (at least) 1995 Common interest with other partners in developing software systems bringing together many interacting entities Hence, when European Commission declared interest in information ecosystems… DIET

3 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 3 Universal Information Ecosystems What was said in the call: Information Ecosystem - vision of future information devices interacting in many complex ways akin to natural ecosystems - populated by infohabitants devices, virtual entities software agents individuals organisations

4 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 4 The Real Thing

5 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 5 Why DIET? Decentralised - run applications made of many distributed entities (mobile agents) - collaboration without need for centralised control Information Ecosystem - manage information through interaction of many entities - analogous to interactions in natural ecosystems Technologies - basis for deployment of distributed technologies

6 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 6 Involvement and roles BTexact Technologies Technical University of Crete DFKI Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Visualisation Economic interaction Information brokering Information filtering and mining Core platform Applications Coordination

7 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 7 Progress WP1: The DIET Platform WP2: Information Alert WP3: Information Brokering WP5: Visualisation WP6: Dissemination and Exploitation

8 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 8 The DIET platform > architecture Application layer ARC layer Core layer Application reusable services Application components Visualisation components Validation components DIET platform kernel Debugging & visualisation kernel Debugging & visualisation components

9 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 9 DIET platform kernel > overview The physics of the DIET ecosystem Hierarchy of elements - Universe, World, Environment, Infohabitant (=Agent), Connection, Message DIET environment provides: - Agent creation - Agent destruction - Agent migration - Agent communication

10 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 10 Lightweight agents > infohabitants Agents can be very lightweight: Need only one thread... - Event portal … or even no thread! - Thread sharing Connection contexts avoid look-up tables 500000 Agents on single machine.

11 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 11 Thread sharing ThreadPool Environment ThreadPool

12 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 12 Decentralisation Architecture fully decentralised No central agent naming scheme - Agents have identities assigned locally - Identities are randomly initialised bitstrings No central world registry - World neighbourhoods defined in P2P fashion - Connections between worlds created on demand

13 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 13 The platform: further directions Basis for research within DIET Basis for application development within BTexact Scenarios for third-party licensing under investigation See Marrow et al. (2001); Hoile et al. (2002)

14 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 14 Information Retrieval, Filtering and Mining Universidad Carlos III de Madrid - with Technical University of Crete Used DIET platform as basis to build societies of agents engaged in information push and pull tasks Can use these agents to construct information retrieval, filtering and mining applications with which to validate the performance of the system

15 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 15 I-Gaia: the world of Infocytes TI MI see Gallardo-Antolin et al. (2002) SI

16 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 16 Information Brokering Technical University of Crete - together with BTexact Technologies - and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Models for the brokering of information in information ecosystem middleware Implementation of brokering systems based on DIET platform Development of self-organising communities application

17 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 17 An Open Information Ecosystem Middleware users Information consumers information sources Information producers queries/profiles information

18 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 18 Visualisation DFKI (Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliches Intelligenz) Simple visualizer of multi-agent system constructed early in project Later work developing more complex user and development interface See van Lengen & Bähr (2002)

19 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 19 Visualisation > architecture Application layer ARC layer Core layer Application reusable services Application components Visualisation components Validation components DIET platform kernel Debugging & visualisation kernel Debugging & visualisation components

20 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 20 Visualisation

21 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 21 Visualisation > further directions Provision of different views of DIET multi- agent system Interface to allow visual programming of DIET systems Different approaches to debugging of DIET applications

22 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 22 Dissemination and Exploitation Dissemination - all partners see e.g. references Exploitation - BTexact Technologies leads application development - Implementation of experimental scenarios - Development together with other projects DIET providing infrastructure

23 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 23 Examples Self-organising communities Evolving preferences SWAN and DIET

24 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 24 Self-organising communities > ideas Flexible and effective organisation Organised by middle agents Users expressed characteristics - track user preferences/interests from user behaviour - no difficult user preference representation or matching problems Flexible, scalable, robust, distributed

25 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 25 Self-organising communities > implementation User agents - register/unregister with a middle agent - initiate a query/process query results Middleman agents - search scheme - award scheme - exchange scheme

26 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 26 Formation of communities

27 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 27 Self-organising communities > results Algorithm is highly scalable Improves speed of search for users Now basis for further application development - see Wang (2002)

28 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 28 Evolving group preferences Facilitating interaction between users in different environments Using scout agents to locate alternative environments for communication Selecting for improved adaptation to environments Combining agent population with evolutionary algorithm Using evolutionary algorithm to evolve preferences See Marrow et al. (2002)

29 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 29 Scout Success Single Category 8 Users 128 Users

30 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 30 Environment Preference Single Category 8 Users 128 Users

31 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 31 Changing scout success

32 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 32 SWAN: Nodes in p2p system Physical network 522 921 773 391 13.10.2.7 13.10.2.4 25.2.12.4 25.10.13.5 18.6.5.15 494 identity (location-independent) address

33 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 33 SWAN: Node look-up for p2p Problem: identity of node address of node? Peer-to-peer (p2p) domain requires: - fully decentralised system - yet robust and scalable Solution: - Let nodes self-organise into a Small World Network (SWN) - Use SWN to find nodes

34 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 34 Complementary Technologies DIET - fail-fast - fully decentralised - indefinitely scalable, but no global addressing SWAN - failure tolerant - fully decentralised - highly scalable global addressing system See Bonsma & Hoile (2002)

35 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 35 Discussion Activities in DIET covering a range of research directions Information ecosystem as implemented does not stick closely to biological inspiration But provides useful infrastructure for a variety of experiments and applications How will this be used in the future? What links are possible with results of other projects?

36 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 36 Discussion How can results from information ecosystems projects contribute to the emergence of... - peer-to-peer computing - ad-hoc mobile computing - ubiquitous computing - pervasive computing How integrate these areas with agent technologies in information ecosystems?

37 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 37 References Marrow, P, M. Koubarakis, R.H. van Lengen, F. Valverde-Albacete, E. Bonsma, J. Cid-Suerio, A.R. Figueiras-Vidal, A. Gallardo-Antolín, C. Hoile, T. Koutris, H. Molina-Bulla, A. Navia-Vázquez, P. Raftopoulou, N. Skarmeas, C. Tryfonopoulos, F. Wang, C. Xiruhaki (2001) Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach. In: Proceedings of Symposium on Intelligent Agents for E-commerce, AISB01 (2001 Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour) Convention, University of York, April 2001. Bonsma, E. & Hoile, C. (2002) A distributed implementation of the SWAN peer-to-peer look-up system using mobile agents. In: Proceedings of International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems 2002 (AAMAS2002), tba, Bologna, July 2002. Gallardo-Antolín, A., Navia-Vázquez, A., Molina-Bulla, H.Y., Rodríguez-González, A.B, Valverde- Albacete, F.J., Cid-Sueiro, J., Figueiras-Vidal, A.R., Koutris, T., Xirouhaki, C. & Koubarakis, M. (2002) I-Gaia: an Information Processing Layer for the DIET Platform. In: Proceedings of International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems 2002 (AAMAS2002), pp. 1272-1279, Bologna, July 2002. Hoile, C., Wang, F., Bonsma, E. & Marrow, P. (2002) Core specification and experiments in DIET: a decentralised ecosystem-inspired mobile agent system. In: Proceedings of International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems 2002 (AAMAS2002), pp. 623-630, Bologna, July 2002. van Lengen, R.H. & Bähr, J.-T. (2002) Visualisation and debugging of decentralised information ecosystems. In: Proceedings of Dagstuhl Seminar on Software Visualization, Dagstuhl, February 2002. Springer, Berlin. Marrow, P., Hoile, C., Wang, F. & Bonsma, E.R. (2002) Evolving preferences among emergent groups of agents. In: Proceedings of Symposium on Adaptive Agents and Multi-Agent Systems (AAMAS-II), AISB02 (2002 Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour) Convention, Imperial College, London, April 2002. Wang, F. (2002) Self-organising communities formed by middle agents. In: Proceedings of International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems 2002 (AAMAS2002), pp. 1333-1339, Bologna, July 2002.

38 © British Telecommunications plc, 2003 DIET @ UIE 38 Acknowledgements BTexact DIET team - Erwin Bonsma, Cefn Hoile, Fang Wang Universidad Carlos III de Madrid - Francisco Valverde-Albacete et al. Technical University of Crete - Manolis Koubarakis et al. Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliches Intelligenz - Rolf van Lengen et al.


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