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Obesity, Nutrition, Nutrigenonmics – OH MY! Karen L. Edwards, Ph.D Karen L. Edwards, Ph.D. Director, UW Center for Genomics and Public Health Department.

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Presentation on theme: "Obesity, Nutrition, Nutrigenonmics – OH MY! Karen L. Edwards, Ph.D Karen L. Edwards, Ph.D. Director, UW Center for Genomics and Public Health Department."— Presentation transcript:

1 Obesity, Nutrition, Nutrigenonmics – OH MY! Karen L. Edwards, Ph.D Karen L. Edwards, Ph.D. Director, UW Center for Genomics and Public Health Department of Epidemiology and Institute for Public Health Genetics School of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Washington

2 Objectives 1.Be familiar with the evidence for genetic influences on obesity 2.Be able to define nutrigenomics 3.Understand current limitations of nutrigenomic testing

3 Outline 1.Background 2.Genetics of Obesity Animals Humans 3.Environmental effects 4.Nutrigenomics Why the interest? Current products and examples Why the concern? Moving from promise to practice 5. Summary and Conclusions

4 Mortality Increased risk of premature death Morbidity Diabetes, Heart disease, Hypertension, some Cancers, Breathing Problems, Ischemic Stroke, Arthritis, and Reproductive Complications Prevalence 59 million (30%) Americans are obese (BMI>= 30) Rates are increasing faster than ever (epidemic proportions) Public Health Importance

5 Risk Factors for Obesity Diet: high calorie and low nutrient dense foods Physical Inactivity Age Socioeconomic status Certain medical conditions and medications Race Smoking cessation Family History Genetic susceptibility

6 Evidence for Genetic Influences on Obesity

7 Evidence for genetic influences: Humans Familial aggregation - familial clustering of obesity in families Twin Studies - greater concordance among MZ twins compared to DZ twins Family Studies - variety of statistical models consistent with genetic influences

8 The Search for Obesity Susceptibility Genes I found one! Kenneth M. Weiss & Joseph D. Terwilliger nature genetics volume 26 October 2000

9 Candidate Genes and Single Gene Disorders: Chromosomal Location Image adapted from: Loos, R. J. and C. Bouchard (2003). J Intern Med 254(5):

10 Genetics of Human Obesity Common form(s) of obesity are likely due to complex interactions between genes and environment - body fat pattern - appetite regulation - other pathways Rare monogenic forms do not account for majority of cases

11 Trends in Obesity From the CDC website: BRFSS Trends Data

12 Trends in Obesity From the CDC Website: NHANES Study Data

13 Trends in Obesity

14 Nutrigenomics Integrates genomics and nutrition Goal: Improving health and preventing disease through tailored diet and lifestyle prescriptions

15 Nutrigenomics: Magic, Myths and Maybes

16 Nutrigenomics vs. Nutrigenetics Nutrigenomics Nutrigenomics refers to the application of genomics in nutrition research, enabling associations to be made between specific nutrients and genetic factors, e.g. the way in which food or food ingredients influence gene expression…Nutrigenomics should facilitate greater understanding of how nutrition affects metabolic pathways and how this process goes awry in diet-related diseases. Chadwick R. (2004) Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 63: Nutrigenetics Nutrigenetics is the study of individual differences at the genetic level influencing response to diet. These individual differences may be at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms rather than at the gene level…It is envisaged that nutrigenetics may lead to individualized dietary advice. Chadwick R. (2004) Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 63:

17 Nutrigenomics vs. Nutrigenetics Nutrigenomics Nutrigenomics attempts to study the genome-wide influences of nutrition…[and] aims to identify the genes that influence the risk of diet- related diseases on a genome- wide scale, and to understand the mechanisms that underlie these genetic predispositions. Muller M & Kersten S. (2003) Nature Reviews Genetics 4: Nutrigenetics Nutrigenetics examines the effect of genetic variation on the interaction between diet and disease or on nutrient requirements. Genetics has a pivotal role in determining an individuals risk of developing a certain disease. Muller M & Kersten S. (2003) Nature Reviews Genetics 4:

18 Nutrigenomics vs. Nutrigenetics Nutrigenomics Nutrigenomics describes the use of functional genomic tools to probe a biological system following a nutritional stimulus that will permit an increased understanding of how nutritional molecules affect metabolic pathways and homeostatic control. Mutch D, et al. (2005) FASEB Journal 19: Nutrigenomics focuses on the effect of nutrients on the genome, proteome, and metabolome. Ordovas J & Mooser M. (2004) Current Opinion in Lipidology 15: Nutrigenetics Nutrigenetics embodies the science of identifying and characterizing gene variants associated with differential responses to nutrients, and relating this variation to disease states. Mutch D, et al. (2005) FASEB Journal 19: Nutrigenetics examines the effect of genetic variation on the interaction between diet and exercise. This includes…gene variants associated with, or responsible for, differential responses to nutrients. Ordovas J & Mooser M. (2004) Current Opinion in Lipidology 15:

19 Nutrigenomics & Nutrigenetics: Two Sides of a Coin Mutch D, et al. (2005) FASEB Journal 19:

20 Nutritional Genomics The study of how different foods can interact with particular genes to increase the risk of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease and some cancers Goal: Use of personalized diets to prevent or delay the onset of disease and optimize and maintain human health

21 Nutritional Genomics van Ommen B. (2004) Nutrition 20:4-8.

22 Why the interest? Improve health of populations United States Globally Improve athletic performance Weight loss Potential economic impact Functional food and dietary supplements is currently a $40 billion industry The focus on nutrigenomics could mean an $80 billion dollar industry in 7-10 years

23 What is the evidence? Single Gene Disorders PKU Lactose intolerance Complex conditions Genes involved in susceptibility to complex diseases have been identified Nutritional environment modifies the expression of genes Metabolism of nutrients may vary by genotype, ultimately affecting health

24 What is the public health implication? Can we use this information along with our increasing knowledge of the genetics of obesity for public health applications? Obesity epidemic

25 Direct to Consumer Marketing Health Clubs Vending Machines Internet Retail stores

26 On the internet

27

28 Weight Loss DNA Diet Builds Customized Weight-Loss Plan One-size-fits-all diets could be a thing of the past. NBC station KNSD in San Diego reported that a handful of bio-tech companies are promising a high-tech recipe for losing weight and eating better. The newest weight-loss plan is a customized diet based on your DNA. The DNA diet is a personalized meal plan that claims to be based on your unique genetic blueprint. Katzin claims that based on your DNA profile she can determine whether someone should increase the amount of folic acid, B-6 or B-12, for example. So, we would choose foods that are rich in those supplements. … interprets the data and makes a customized meal plan. Her suggestions range from taking more vitamins to eating more meat.

29 Diet Design, One Pair of Genes at a Time Health: You Are What You Eat Oct. 31, 2005 issue - Bruce Morrill is something of a health nut. So when his nutritionist suggested he take a $695 DNA test so she could individualize his diet plan, Morrill, a 42- year-old UPS driver from Reno, Nev., agreed.

30 Currently in the United States, no regulations are in place for evaluating the accuracy and reliability of genetic testing. Most genetic tests developed by laboratories are categorized as services, which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate. This lack of government oversight is particularly troublesome in light of the fact that a handful of companies have started marketing test kits directly to the public. Some of these companies make dubious claims about how the kits not only test for disease but also serve as tools for customizing medicine, vitamins, and foods to each individual's genetic makeup. (doegenomes.org) Genetic testing to identify alleged risk factors that have no proven corrective measures is simply a waste of money. As noted by Helen Wallace, Ph.D., Deputy Director of GeneWatch UK: "For most people, tailoring your diet to your genetic make-up is about as scientific as tailoring your diet to your star sign."

31 Sciona International company previously based in the UK Personalized health and nutrition recommendations Products were available through retail stores GeneWatch UK called on retail stores to stop offering these tests Currently based in Boulder, Colorado Launching a campaign in 4 test markets Partnerships with retail stores and local health care system

32 In store sales

33 Lund Foods CEO: …plan is to create a link between the evaluations performed by Sciona and his stores food experts, which have long provided consumers with diet and nutritional advice and information. Today Food Editor: The idea, which is a good one, is to help shoppers understand what they can do in their daily food choices to either maintain their good health or help correct certain genetic defects that the test may have identified.

34 Heart Health Analyzes thirteen of your genes that may play an important role in determining how your body manages overall heart health …assesses nine key diet and lifestyle action areas

35 Bone Health Analyzes four of your genes that may play an important role in determining how your body manages overall bone health..assesses seven key diet and lifestyle action areas

36 Insulin Resistance Analyzes five of your genes that may play an important role in determining how your body manages overall insulin resistance..assesses five key diet and lifestyle action areas

37 Genetic Assessment for Antioxidant and Detoxification Analyzes six of your genes that may play an important role in determining how your body manages overall antioxidant/ detoxification health..assesses four key diet and lifestyle action areas

38 Inflammation Health Analyzes six of your genes that may play an important role in determining how your body manages inflammation..assesses four key diet and lifestyle action areas

39

40 Consumer Demand? Sciona claims to have sold 10,000 kits in Europe, Asia and the US Current use is likely limited to those who can afford to pay HealthSyles Survey indicates that only 14% of US population are aware of these tests, and only 0.6% have used a test - age and income are associated with awareness (Goddard et al., GIM 2007;9:510-7)

41 Currently in the United States, no regulations are in place for evaluating the accuracy and reliability of genetic testing. Most genetic tests developed by laboratories are categorized as services, which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate. This lack of government oversight is particularly troublesome in light of the fact that a handful of companies have started marketing test kits directly to the public. Some of these companies make dubious claims about how the kits not only test for disease but also serve as tools for customizing medicine, vitamins, and foods to each individual's genetic makeup. (doegenomes.org) Genetic information is unlike other health information, in that it also provides information about your family members Genetic testing to identify alleged risk factors that have no proven corrective measures is simply a waste of money. As noted by Helen Wallace, Ph.D., Deputy Director of GeneWatch UK: "For most people, tailoring your diet to your genetic make-up is about as scientific as tailoring your diet to your star sign." Why the Concern?

42 Buyer Beware A recent report by the Government Accountability Office highlighted a few of the concerns with four examples of DTC nutrigenomic tests. The GAO report raised concerns that the tests may mislead consumers by making unsound and ambiguous predictions about health risks. In addition, the test results frequently include recommendations for the consumer to purchase dietary supplements that may be significantly overpriced compared with similar products available through a supermarket or pharmacy and that may, in fact, be harmful for some individuals.

43 Potential Benefits Increased focus on a healthy diet and lifestyle Motivate positive behavior change Increased awareness of risk of certain conditions Improved health and quality of life Focus on prevention Decreased morbidity and premature mortality Reduced health care costs Identify subgroups who might be particularly responsive or resistant to environmental (dietary) intervention Better understanding of the mechanisms involved in disease susceptibility

44 Potential Harms Attention is drawn away from other modifiable risk factors Decreased use of other services False sense of security Focus on specific nutrients/foods Ineffective or harmful Misleading claims Dilute or contradict public health messages

45 Potential Harms, cont. Increased costs associated with personalized diets and designer foods Targeting vulnerable populations Concerns surrounding confidentiality, insurance Biobanking of samples, informed consent Unintended consequences

46 From Promise to Practice Consistent evidence Evidence for clinical utility – added value Understand how information is used Culturally specific translation Thoughtful integration based on evidence Holistic approach Address ELSI issues prior to integration Access to services and treatment

47 Summary Potential is exciting Range of opinions regarding readiness of current applications Many parallels to pharmacogenomics Dr. Arno Motulsky: the total promise of PGX is often overstated and is unlikely to lead to a revolution in therapeutics May provide benefits to some individuals, but probably not as broadly as currently predicted

48 Conclusions Obesity is influenced by both genes AND environment Obesity is associated with poverty, SES and education Diet is important High-fat energy-dense foods are often the cheapest options for the consumer Health foods cost more Nutrigenomic testing is not ready for prime time

49 UW Center for Genomics and Public Health Funded as part of the ASPH/CDC/ATSDR cooperative agreement Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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