Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 2006 Mississippi Language Arts Framework-Revised Transitioning to the New Frameworks Office.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 2006 Mississippi Language Arts Framework-Revised Transitioning to the New Frameworks Office."— Presentation transcript:

1 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 2006 Mississippi Language Arts Framework-Revised Transitioning to the New Frameworks Office of Reading, Early Childhood and Language Arts

2 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Thats ME!

3 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Superintendents Goals Recruit and retain an experienced, quality team at MDE to provide state leadership in accelerating student learning Ensure that we have quality teachers in every classroom Ensure that we have quality leaders in every district and school Provide a rigorous high quality curriculum and assessment program that accelerates student learning Build and enhance a positive perception of public education in Mississippi

4 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Gain = 2 points Gain = 5 points Copyright © 2006 Mississippi Department of Education

5 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 1 point decrease No Gain Copyright © 2006 Mississippi Department of Education

6 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Overall Reading/ELA Performance Mississippi Assessment & NAEP Grades 4 and 8 Fourth Grade Eighth Grade 81%

7 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Context for Current Revision Results of alignment studies required by USDE (conducted in 2003 and 2004) Some competencies were difficult or inappropriate to assess on a large-scale assessment. Breadth and depth of coverage of competencies and objectives on the assessment could be improved. Cognitive demand (rigor) on the assessments could be improved. This information became input for revision of the curriculum frameworks and the assessment.

8 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education MCT: Relationship Between Curriculum and Assessment Curriculum Framework -Competencies -Objectives -Suggested teaching strategies Instructional Intervention Supplements - Benchmarks Mississippi Curriculum Test Results reported in Reporting Categories

9 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education MCT2: Relationship between Curriculum and Assessment Curriculum Framework -Competencies -Objectives/ (Benchmarks) -Suggested teaching strategies Mississippi Curriculum Test Results reported by competency Transparency and Alignment

10 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Development Process

11 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Revision Cycle Six Year Cycle 12-24 Month Process K-16 Involvement Aligned with Textbook Adoption Cycle Research Revision Stan d ards Implementation

12 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Framework Committees Recommended by District Superintendents Selected based upon knowledge and experience Representative of all areas of the State Inclusive of IHL

13 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Resources Utilized IRA – International Reading Association NCTE – National Council for Teachers of English NAEP – National Assessment of Educational Progress Other State Frameworks Scientifically Based Reading Research

14 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Language Arts Framework Organization and Terminology

15 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Framework Components Mission Statement Purpose Implementation Cycle Information Strands Competencies Objectives Appendix Glossary

16 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Key Terms Strands- areas of process or content which are interrelated and found throughout the framework Competencies – broad guidelines of ongoing instruction Objectives – serve as a guide, indicating how competencies can be fulfilled through a progression of content and concept at each grade level and course Sequence – suggested progression of coursework from 7 th grade through 12 th grade in each subject area

17 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Mission Statement The primary purpose of the Mississippi Language Arts Framework 2006 is to promote an understanding of the principles, concepts, and processes of the language arts curriculum in Mississippi. The content of the framework is centered on the areas of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, research, and inquiry. In teaching each of these key areas of the language arts curriculum, teachers should work to ensure students are actively engaged in meaningful activities that emphasize the importance of language arts in daily life; enhance students confidence in their ability to read, write, speak, listen, view, and conduct research; and help students learn to communicate and reason more effectively. The framework provides teachers with a guide to assist in instructing students with the essential language arts concepts students should learn as they pursue a career or continue their education.

18 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Key Ideas Content is centered on the areas of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, research and inquiry Actively engaged Meaningful activities Emphasize the importance of language arts in daily life Enhance students confidence in their ability to read, write, speak, listen, view, and conduct research Help students learn to communicate and reason more effectively

19 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education The framework provides teachers with a guide to assist in instructing students with the essential language arts concepts students should learn as they pursue a career or continue their education.

20 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education What are the essential concepts for language arts? Word recognition and vocabulary Comprehension Composing process Grammar, punctuation, sentence structure

21 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education How are these concepts defined in the 2006 MS Language Arts Framework-Revised? Strands Competencies Objectives Depth of Knowledge (DOK) levels Numbered Items Examples Text complexity

22 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Language Arts Strands Reading Writing Speaking Listening Viewing

23 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Strands are not listed in the MLAF Should be integrated and embedded in daily lessons Allow flexibility for teachers in meeting the individual needs of students

24 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Competencies The competencies are the required learning standards for all students. Competencies are intentionally broad in order to allow school districts and teachers the flexibility to create a curriculum that meets the needs of their individual students.

25 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Have the competencies been changed in the new Framework? YearGrade 2-3Grades 4-8English II MLAF 200011 Competencies 14 Competencies 10 Competencies MLAF 20064 Competencies (2 Reading and 2 Writing) 4 Competencies (2 Reading and 2 Writing) 4 Competencies (2 Reading and 2 Writing)

26 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Language Arts Competencies K-8 1.The student will use word recognition and vocabulary (word meaning) skills to communicate. (Word Recognition and Vocabulary) 2.The student will apply strategies and skills to comprehend, respond to, interpret, or evaluate a variety of texts of increasing length, difficulty, and complexity. (Comprehension)

27 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Language Arts Competencies K-8 3.The student will express, communicate, or evaluate ideas effectively. (Composing process) 4.The student will apply standard English to communicate. (Grammar, punctuation, sentence structure)

28 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Where do I find the competencies in the Mississippi Language Arts Framework? COMPETENCIES and Objectives 1. The student will use word recognition and vocabulary (word meaning) skills to communicate. a.The student will use syllabication types (e.g., open, closed, r-controlled, vowel team, vowel-consonant + e, consonant + le) for decoding words. (DOK 1) b.The student will identify roots and affixes (e.g., non-, trans-, over-, anti-, inter-, super-, semi-, com-, ex-, il-, mid-, under-, sub-, –tion, -or, -ion, -ity, -ment, -ic) in words. (DOK 2) c.The student will develop and apply expansive knowledge of words and word meaning to communicate. (DOK 1)

29 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Competency Considerations Language arts is a unique discipline. What students are expected to do, i.e., read, write, speak, listen, enjoy literature, understand language, etc., remains pretty much the same from year to year. What differs is the degree of sophistication expected and the complexity of the materials (texts) used.

30 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Competency Considerations Still, the public needs to know, and teachers need to understand, what makes materials more complex and performance more sophisticated. These questions are answered through the use of objectives, DOK levels, numbered items, and examples. Norman L. Webb

31 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education How do I know exactly what I should be teaching for any given competency? Every competency in the Framework is followed by a list of objectives. These objectives indicate skills that enable fulfillment of competencies, describe competencies in further detail, or show the progression of concepts throughout the grades.

32 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Where do I find the objectives in the Mississippi Language Arts Framework? COMPETENCIES and Objectives 1. The student will use word recognition and vocabulary (word meaning) skills to communicate. a. The student will apply knowledge of roots and affixes (e.g., non-, trans-, over-, anti-, inter-, super-, semi-, com-, ex-, il-, mid-, under-, sub-, –tion, -or, -ion, -ity, -ment, -ic, - ian, -ist, -ous, -eous, -ious, -ance, -ence, -ive, -en) to determine the meaning of multi-syllabic words. (DOK 2) b.The student will develop and apply expansive knowledge of words and word meaning to communicate. (DOK 1)

33 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education How can the objectives be utilized effectively in teaching? Teachers should pay careful attention to the verbs used in each objective. –The student will analyze text to understand, infer, draw conclusions, or synthesize information. (DOK 2) When necessary, teachers may use the vertical alignment documents to back up to earlier objectives.

34 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Vertical Alignment Documents First GradeSecond GradeThird Grade The student will begin to identify and use roots and affixes (e.g., un-, re-, -s, -es, -ed, -ing) to decode and understand words. (DOK 2) The student will manipulate and analyze roots and affixes (e.g., un-, re-, mis-, pre-, -s, -es, -ed, -ing, -y, -ly, -er, -est, –ful, and -less) to understand unfamiliar words. (DOK 2) The student will manipulate and analyze roots and affixes (e.g., un-, re-, mis-, pre-, dis-, in-, im-, ir-, -s, - es, -ed,- ing, -y, -ly, -er, -est, –ful, -less, - able, - ness, - ish) to analyze words. (DOK 2)

35 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Looking Closely at Objectives Identify – to recognize Use – to employ for a purpose Manipulate – to handle, manage or use with skill; to change to suit ones purpose Analyze – to separate into constituent parts

36 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Looking Closely at Objectives Identify Circle the prefix in the following word. –misinform Underline the suffix in the following word. –information

37 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Looking Closely at Objectives Use Add a prefix and a suffix to the following word so the new word means that someone is not informed inform uned

38 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Looking Closely at Objectives Analyze Look closely at the following word. Circle the base word. informative What other parts of the word do you see? Based on what you know about the suffix -ative, what does this word mean? Giving instruction -ative

39 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Looking Closely at Objectives Manipulate How could you change the word inform to mean to communicate knowledge incorrectly? –misinform How could you change the word misinform to mean to a person who informs? –informant

40 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Where do I find the benchmarks in the MLAF 2006? The benchmarks are found within the objectives and numbered items following each objective. There is no longer a list of benchmarks and/or benchmark items to be covered by teachers. Teachers should teach the competencies and the objectives found within the Framework.

41 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Is there anything else I should know about the MLAF 2006? The revised framework contains information concerning the depth of knowledge for each objective. The DOK is listed at the end of each objective. The student will identify and use synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms. (DOK 2)

42 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education What is DOK? DOK stands for depth of knowledge. DOK is one way administrators, teachers, and parents can understand objectives in terms of the complexity of what students are expected to know and do. Developed by Norman L. Webb.

43 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Factors to Be Considered Sophistication and complexity. Whether or not students have received prior instruction or have had an opportunity to learn the content.

44 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education DOK Levels Level 1 – Recall and Reproduction Level 2 – Basic Reasoning, Using Skills and Concepts Level 3 – Complex or Strategic Thinking Level 4 – Extended Thinking or Reasoning

45 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 1 – Recall and Reproduction Recall of information such as a fact, definition, term, or a simple procedure. Requires students to demonstrate a rote response, use a well-known formula, or follow a set procedure. Common verbs include: describe, explain, recognize, identify.

46 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 1 – Recall and Reproduction Example Questions Name a word that means the same thing as little. What did the big, bad wolf say to the first little pig? How many syllables do you hear in the word family?

47 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 2 – Basic Reasoning, Using Skills and Concepts Includes the engagement of some mental processing beyond recalling or reproducing a response. More than one step. Common verbs include: explain, describe, summarize, predict, or interpret.

48 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 2 – Basic Reasoning, Using Skills and Concepts Example Questions What does the simile as gentle as a lamb mean? Which part of a book will help you find all of the pages in the book containing information about turtles? Retell the story of Charlottes Web in your own words.

49 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 3 – Complex or Strategic Thinking Requires reasoning, planning, and using evidence. Cognitive levels are complex and abstract. May have more than one answer. May require students to justify their response.

50 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 3 – Complex or Strategic Thinking Example Questions Write a description of Charlotte the spider. Be sure to include specific details about Charlotte. Use vivid language in your answer. Who was a better friend to Wilbur – Charlotte or Fern? Justify your answer with evidence from the story.

51 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 4 – Extended Thinking or Reasoning Have high cognitive demands and are very complex. Requires complex reasoning, experimental design and planning, and an extended period of time

52 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Level 4 – Extended Thinking or Reasoning Example Questions Global warming is a controversial topic in the news. Research this topic. Write a research paper presenting information supporting and opposing the issue. Use a variety of sources. Document the facts as presented by individuals who believe in global warming and those who do not believe in global warming.

53 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Teaching with DOK in Mind State assessments will be designed so that fifty percent (50%) of test items match the DOK of the corresponding objectives. Instruction may need to be scaffolded for students in order to reach the target DOK.

54 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Numbered Items Continue to Define Objectives b. The student will apply knowledge of phonological and phonemic awareness. (DOK 2) (Phonological and phonemic awareness skills are oral skills. Once the skills are paired with print, they become phonics activities). 1)Identify and produce rhyming words orally that include consonant blends and digraphs (e.g., flat/splat, trap/snap, sing/ring). 2)Identify, blend, and segment syllables within compound, two, and three syllable spoken words (e.g., clap the syllables in bi-cy-cle, bas + ket + ball = basketball, telephone = tel + e + phone).

55 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Examples Provided Continue to Define Objectives b. The student will apply knowledge of phonological and phonemic awareness. (DOK 2) 1)Identify and produce rhyming words orally that include consonant blends and digraphs (e.g., flat/splat, trap/snap, sing/ring).

56 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Identify – Do these words rhyme?

57 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Produce – Say a word that sounds like…

58 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Think About This 1) Identify and produce rhyming words orally that include consonant blends and digraphs (e.g., flat/splat, trap/snap, sing/ring).

59 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Think About This 1) Identify and produce rhyming words orally that include consonant blends and digraphs (e.g., flat/splat, trap/snap, sing/ring).

60 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Is there anything else I should know about the MLAF 2006? Priority objectives are underlined in grades K-3. Newly introduced skills and concepts are bold-faced throughout the MLAF. Suggested teaching strategies are included. The MLAF 2006 is much more specific than the MLAF 2000.

61 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Text Complexity A critical component at each grade level is text complexity. Text complexity is indicated by such elements as sophistication of language, content, and syntax. As students move from kindergarten to grade twelve, texts should require a greater cognitive involvement by the student in order for the student to appreciate and comprehend the meaning and beauty inherent in language. Text composed by students should also reflect this increasing complexity.

62 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Readability Independent – 99% or more words read correctly with 90% or more comprehension Instructional – 95% or more words read correctly with 75% or more comprehension Frustrational – less than 90% accuracy and less than 50% comprehension

63 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Readability Students should never be asked to read texts that are at a frustrational level. The greatest gains in student learning occur when students read instructional level texts. If students are reading texts that are difficult for them, teachers should ensure that tasks are supported or scaffolded.

64 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Matching Students to Texts Tools for determining readability include: Readability formulas –Flesch-Kincaid –Lexile Frameworks –STAR reading

65 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Matching Students to Texts Informal reading inventories Teach students the three-finger rule Observe students reading Running records

66 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Content Students background knowledge about a particular topic is crucial to understanding a passage.

67 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Making Decisions About Content Despite most of a summer of neglect, the plants were surprisingly tall and full-leaved and worm- free, though weeds grew thick in the rows and the plants were badly in need of topping and suckering. She believed the plants had thrived despite disregard because they must have been planted in full accordance with the signs. She calculated that with luck they might get a small crop and said that if they cured the leaves and soaked them in sorghum water and twisted them into plugs, they could trade for seed and salt and leavening and other items they could not produce themselves.

68 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education In Considering Content Teachers may need to build background knowledge prior to reading. Teachers may need to preteach vocabulary.

69 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Syntax = the rules or patterns for forming a sentence. Some texts will have syntax that is difficult for students to understand. His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same color as the dun white sockets in which they were set, his shriveled complexion and straight black lips.

70 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Text Complexity The language, content, and syntax used within a specific text are important. Teachers should pay close attention to all three of these when selecting texts to be read in class. Teachers should also make plans for scaffolding instruction when language, content or syntax may pose difficulties for students.

71 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Useful Assessment Documents Performance Level Descriptors or PLDs MCT2 Item Specifications MCT2 Test Blueprints

72 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Performance Level Descriptors Serve a dual purpose: 1)to guide the development of the assessments, cut score standard setting, and reporting descriptors and 2)to guide teachers instructional efforts to ensure that students reach proficient levels of performance on the content standards.

73 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Range of PLDs To be judged to have achieved a performance level, the student must at least be able to exhibit performance described at that level. The student may be able to do much more, but until the student is able to perform all that is described in the next higher level of performance, the student is assigned the lower level.

74 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education PLD Development: Proposed Language Advanced: Students at the advanced level are able to perform at a high level of difficulty, complexity, or fluency as specified by the grade- level content standards. Proficient: Students at the proficient level are able to perform at the level of difficulty, complexity, or fluency specified by the grade-level content standards. Basic: Students at the basic level are able to perform some of the content standards at a low level of difficulty, complexity, or fluency as specified by the grade-level content standards.

75 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Proficient: Student expectations are defined by the framework Students performing at the proficient level: In vocabulary: Identify roots and affixes (non-, trans-, over-, anti-, -tion, -or, -ion, -ity, -ment, -ic) in words. Apply expansive knowledge of words and word meanings. Apply knowledge of simple figurative language (hyperbole) to determine meaning of words and communicate. Use context clues (definitions, synonyms, or antonyms) to infer meanings. Use reference materials (dictionary, glossary) to determine syllabication, synonyms, antonyms, and parts of speech for unknown words. In reading comprehension: Apply knowledge of text features (boldfaced print, italics, maps, icons, pull-down menus, key word searches); parts of a book (appendix, footnotes); text structures (compare/contrast); and genres to interpret or analyze text. Analyze texts in order to infer or synthesize information. Generate a summary or paraphrase of events or ideas in text, citing text-based evidence. Interpret increasingly complex text to compare and contrast information regarding story elements (setting, characters, character traits, events, resolution, point of view); literary devices (imagery, exaggeration, dialogue); sound devices (rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, onomatopoeia, assonance); and authors purpose (inform, entertain, persuade). Identify tools of persuasion (name calling, endorsement, repetition, air and rebut the other sides point of view) in text.

76 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Basic: Student expectations may include an objective or portion of an objective Students performing at the basic level: In vocabulary: Use syllabication types for decoding words. Identify and produce synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms. Apply knowledge of simple figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification) to determine meaning. Use reference materials (dictionary, glossary) to determine the meaning and pronunciation of unknown words. In reading comprehension: Recognize and identify text features (boldfaced print, italics, maps, icons, pull-down menus, key word searches); parts of a book (appendix, footnotes); text structures (compare/contrast) and genres to understand text. Analyze text to identify and understand information. Recognize a summary or paraphrase of the events or ideas in text. Use text to identify story elements, literary devices, sound devices, and authors purpose. Distinguish between fact and opinion.

77 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Advanced: Student expectations are stated for high cognitive levels Students performing at the advanced level: In vocabulary: Compare the use of figurative language in multiple texts to justify inferred meaning of words. Justify the use of context clues to infer meaning. In reading comprehension: Evaluate an inferred outcome or synthesis based on text- based evidence.

78 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Item Specifications Development of items for statewide assessments requires a thorough understanding of and familiarity with the Mississippi curriculum frameworks and the performance level descriptors. The item specifications document is meant to serve as a guide to item writers relative to both item content and format.

79 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Item Specifications As Guides The item specifications document can be used to develop practice items. However, the example items provided in this document are just thatexamples. They are not released test items. They are not meant to be put together to form a classroom test.

80 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Purpose of Item Specifications The purpose of the sample items is to provide illustrations of what items of different content and at different depth-of- knowledge levels look like. However, the examples do not provide an adequate sampling of items for drawing conclusions about what students know or can do.

81 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Item Specifications Objective B The student will identify roots and affixes (e.g., non-, trans-, over-, anti-, -tion, -or, -ion, -ity, -ment, -ic) in words. (DOK 2) Example Item(s) 1. What is the root word in overeducated? A. Over B. Educate * C. Educated D. Overeducate Depth of Knowledge Level: 2 Performance Level: Proficient

82 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Item Specifications Objective D The student will identify and produce grade level appropriate synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms. (DOK 2) Example Item(s) 1. Which word is an antonym for splendid? A. Grand B. Dreadful* C. Excellent D. Wonderful Depth of Knowledge Level: 1 Performance Level: Basic

83 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Objective G The student will use reference materials (e.g., dictionary, glossary, teacher or peer [as a resource], thesaurus, electronic dictionary) to determine the meaning, pronunciation, syllabication, synonyms, antonyms, and parts of speech for unknown words. [Note: These reference materials are not available during the administration of state tests.] (DOK 1) Example Item(s) 1.Read the dictionary entry in the box below Contest (contest) n. 1. a struggle; fight; controversy 2. a competitive game v.t. (ken-test) 1. challenge; dispute n. contestant; one who competes In which of the following sentences is the word contest used correctly as a verb? A. The students looked for a contest in which to enter her drawing. B. I entered my dog in the contest that our school held for playful pets. C. She decided to contest my victory in the election for class president. * D. My brother Jake will contest with my friends when they come to visit me.

84 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education DRAFT Language Arts Blueprint

85 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education Final Thoughts – In Order to Design Effective Instruction Teachers Must Understand Strands Competencies Objectives Depth of Knowledge (DOK) levels Numbered Items Examples Text complexity Performance Level Descriptors or PLDs Item Specifications Assessment Blueprints


Download ppt "April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 2006 Mississippi Language Arts Framework-Revised Transitioning to the New Frameworks Office."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google