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Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

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3 Infant suckles at the breast. Stimulation of nerve endings in mothers nipple/areola sends signal to mothers hypothalamus/ pituitary. Pituitary releases prolactin and oxytocin. Hormones travel via bloodstream to mammary gland to stimulate milk production and milk ejection reflex (let-down). Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

4 Maternal Factors That Support Optimal Lactation Normal breast anatomy Intact neuroendocrine reflex Good general health and nutritional status Effective support system Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

5 Nutrition During Lactation Generally healthy diet Drink fluids to thirst Adequate protein and calories Calcium Multivitamin supplement Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

6 Maternal Medications Most are compatible with breastfeeding. Medication use in pregnancy is not the same as medication use in lactation. Weigh benefits against risks. Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

7 Maternal Medications Choose the safest drug available. Prescribe medications for the shortest length of time appropriate. Use short-acting formulations. Administer just after breastfeeding. Monitor infant for side effects. Report adverse effects to the proper authorities. Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

8 References AAP Committee on Drugs Hale: Medications and Mothers Milk Lawrence and Lawrence: Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession Briggs, Freeman, and Yaffe: Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation Lactation Study Center Drug Data Bank, University of Rochester, NY Maternal Medications Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

9 Advise moderation in caffeine intake Avoid alcohol Encourage smoking cessation or limited use Breastfeeding Counseling Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

10 Human Milk Colostrum Present in small volume before delivery and in first days after delivery High in host defense proteins and immunoglobulins Transitional milk Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

11 Human Milk Colostrum Present in small volume before delivery and in first days after delivery High in host defense proteins and immunoglobulins Transitional milk Mature breastmilk Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

12 Twins breastfeeding Premature infant breastfeeding Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics Photo © Nancy Wight, MD, FAAP Photo © Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, FAAP

13 Breastfeeding Positions Mother comfortable Infant head in straight line with body Tummy-to- tummy or chest-to-chest Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics Photo © Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, FAAP

14 Cradle Position Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics

15 Cross-cradle or Transitional Position Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics Photo © La Leche League International

16 Side-lying Position Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics Photo © Roni M. Chastain, RN

17 Clutch or Football Position Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics Photo © Lori Feldman-Winter, MD, MPH, FAAP

18 Latch Stimulate rooting reflex. Take sufficient areola into mouth. Flange lips around the breast fish lips. Have wide angle at corner of mouth. Copyright © 2003, Rev 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics Illustration by Tony LeTourneau


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