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KIM ODEN, DIRECTOR OF COUNSELING ST. FRANCIS HIGH SCHOOL JENNIFER THOMAS, COLLEGE COUNSELOR MAYBECK HIGH SCHOOL Working With Student Athletes.

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Presentation on theme: "KIM ODEN, DIRECTOR OF COUNSELING ST. FRANCIS HIGH SCHOOL JENNIFER THOMAS, COLLEGE COUNSELOR MAYBECK HIGH SCHOOL Working With Student Athletes."— Presentation transcript:

1 KIM ODEN, DIRECTOR OF COUNSELING ST. FRANCIS HIGH SCHOOL JENNIFER THOMAS, COLLEGE COUNSELOR MAYBECK HIGH SCHOOL Working With Student Athletes

2 AGENDA What is the difference between Div. I, Div. II and Div. III? How do student-athletes establish eligibility? The recruiting process What happens on the college side? K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/2012 2

3 Food for Thought re: Div. I When a student comes to you to discuss his/her participation in Division I sports, consider the following… K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/2012 3

4 ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP REALITY CHECK In , NCAA institutions gave athletic scholarships amounting to 2% of the 6.4 million high school/youth athletes. Average NCAA scholarship not including football & basketball is $8,707.00/year. Average baseball or track & field scholarship is $ /year. Scholarships must be renewed each year. They are not guaranteed year to year. Tuition, room & board for NCAA institutions cost between $20,000-$50,000 per year. (The New York Times, March 10, 2008) K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/2012 4

5 Student-AthletesMen's Basketball Women's Basketball FootballBaseball Men's Ice Hockey Men's Soccer High School Student Athletes 540,207439,5501,109,278472,64436,475391,839 High School Senior Student Athletes 154,345125,586316,937135,04110,421111,954 NCAA Student Athletes17,00815,42366,31330,3653,94521,770 NCAA Freshman Roster Positions 4,8594,40718,9478,6761,1276,220 NCAA Senior Student Athletes 3,7803,42714,7366, ,838 NCAA Student Athletes Drafted Percent High School to NCAA 3.1%3.5%6.0%6.4%10.8%5.6% Percent NCAA to Professional 1.2%0.9%1.7%8.9%3.8%1.6% Percent High School to Professional 0.03% 0.08%0.44%0.32%0.07% NCAA: National Collegiate Athletic Association Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/2012 5

6 Oregon Football No. NameHt.Wt. Position 47 Alonso, Kiko LB Alonso, Kiko 85 Anderson, Anthony DE 78 Armstrong, Karrington OLArmstrong, Karrington 79 Asper, Mark OLAsper, Mark 51 Ava, Isaac LBAva, Isaac 24 Barner, Kenjon RBBarner, Kenjon 31 Bassett, Kenny RBBassett, Kenny 93 Beard, Rob PKBeard, Rob 3 Bennett, Bryan QBBennett, Bryan 71 Benyard, Everett OLBenyard, Everett K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/2012 6

7 U Conn. Womens Basketball NAMEHeightPOSITIONYRHeightPOSITION Heather BuckHeather Buck6-3Center/ForwardSO Stefanie DolsonStefanie Dolson6-5 CenterFR Michala JohnsonMichala Johnson 6-3ForwardFR Maya MooreMaya Moore6-0 ForwardSR Caroline DotyCaroline Doty5-10GuardJR Lauren EngelnLauren Engeln5-11ForwardFR Kelly FarisKelly Faris5-11GuardSO K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/2012 7

8 UCLA Mens Water Polo No. NameHt.Wt. PositionYear 15Grant Zider6-4215Center/RSSO 13James Palmer Attacker/RS SO 2Ted Peck6-6230CenterSR 3Chris Pulido6-6190DefenderSO 6Brad Greiner6-6195Ctr Defender SO 16Tim Cherry6-6220Ctr Defender FR 14Logan Powell6-4194Attacker/RSSO K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/2012 8

9 Stanford Womens Volleyball No. NameHeightPositionYr 1Lydia Bai6-2Outside Hitter FRLydia Bai 2Carly Wopat6-2Middle BlockerFRCarly Wopat 7Jessica Walker6-1Middle BlockerSOJessica Walker 10Alix Klineman6-4Outside HitterSRAlix Klineman 11Charlotte Brown6-5Middle Blocker FRCharlotte Brown 12Stephanie Browne6-4Middle BlockerJRStephanie Browne 21Hayley Spelman6-6Outside HitterSOHayley Spelman K. Oden & J. Thomas,2/2012 9

10 However…. THERE IS MORE TO LIFE THAN DIVISION I!!!! K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

11 THE ORGANIZATION THE DIVISIONS The NCAA K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

12 The NCAA What is the NCAA? The NCAA, or National Collegiate Athletic Association, was established in 1906 and serves as the athletics governing body for more than 1,300 colleges, universities, conferences and organizations. The national office is in Indianapolis, but the member colleges and universities develop the rules and guidelines for athletics eligibility and athletics competition for each of the three NCAA divisions. The NCAA is committed to the student-athlete and to governing competition in a fair, safe, inclusive and sportsmanlike manner. The NCAA membership includes: 337 active Division I members; 290 active Division II members; 435 active Division III members. One of the differences among the three divisions is that colleges and universities in Divisions I and II may offer athletics scholarships, while Division III colleges and universities may not. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

13 The NCAA K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

14 NCAA Eligibility Center What is the NCAA Eligibility Center? The NCAA Eligibility Center certifies the academic and amateur credentials of all college-bound student-athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division I or II athletics. To assist with this process, the NCAA Eligibility Center staff is eager to foster a cooperative environment of education and partnership with high schools, high school coaches and college-bound student-athletes. Ultimately, the individual student-athlete is responsible for achieving and protecting his or her eligibility status. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

15 When to Sign Up? When Should Students Register? Students may register any time, but the NCAA recommends that students register during their junior year. The Eligibility Center will evaluate a students academic credentials once the following information has been received and the student has had their status requested by an NCAA member institution: a. Completed online registration; b. Fee payment ($65 for U.S. Students); c. SAT or ACT test score on file from the respective testing agency; d. Transcript(s) from all schools or programs attended. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

16 NCAA Resources K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

17 NCAA Resources K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

18 NCAA Sports by Division K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

19 What are the Differences? Division IDivision IIDivision III Ability to offer financial aid awards (scholarships) to student-athletes (The division that spends and gives out the most money) Ability to offer financial aid awards (scholarships) to student-athletes (Spends some money and offers scholarships) No scholarships offered Must offer at least 7 sports for men and 7 for women Must offer at least 5 sports for men and 5 for women Must offer at least 2 team sports for both men and women Must offer 2 team sports for both men and women Have both mens and womens teams playing each season Have a minimum number of contests for each sport CAA_EMS.html # K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

20 Division I The most expensive, competitive, and time consuming division of the NCAA 337 institutions Big athletic department budgets Sizable athletic facilities Increased scholarship money available (ex. DI Football is allowed a maximum of 85 full scholarships) Toughest eligibility requirements: graduate high school with 16 core courses and test score/GPA determined on a sliding scale. Local examples: CAL, Stanford, USF, Santa Clara, St. Marys, UC Davis, SJSU, Pacific, Sac. St., and Cal Poly. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

21 Division I Qualifier Division I Nonqualifier Being a qualifier enables you to: A. Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; B. Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; C. Play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year. As a nonqualifier, you will not be able to: A. Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; B. Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive ne ed- based financial aid. ads/CBSA.pdf Div. I Qualifier vs. Nonqualifier K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

22 Division II Intermediate level as an alternative to the highly competitive DI and the non-scholarship DIII. 290 full or provisional members Smaller public schools and many private colleges that often draw more locally and play closer to home. More limited scholarship opportunities and more partial scholarships that vary from school to school (ex. DII football is allowed 36 scholarships). Local Examples: SFSU, East Bay, Chico, Humboldt, Sonoma, Monterey, Dominican (congrats), and Notre Dame de Namur K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

23 Div. II: Qualifier vs. Partial Qualifier vs. Nonqualifier Division II Div. II Qualifier Division II Partial Qualifier Division II Nonqualifier Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; You will be considered a partial qualifier if you do not meet all of the academic requirements listed, but you have graduated from high school and meet one of the following: The combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68; Completion of the 14 core courses with a core-course grade-point average. You will be considered a nonqualifier if you did not graduate from high school, or, if you graduated and are missing both the core- course grade-point average or minimum number of core courses and the required ACT or SAT scores. Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; As a partial qualifier, you: Can practice with your team at its home facility during your first year of college; Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; Cannot compete during your first year of college; and Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year. As a nonqualifier, you: Cannot practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; Cannot receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need-based financial aid; Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year. Play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibilityfrom year to year. loads/CBSA.pdf K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

24 Division III Largest of the three divisions with 435 member institutions that range in size from ,000 students. Colleges & schools choosing not to offer athletic scholarships. No redshirting athletes. Small class sizes, regional season play, and the opportunity to play more than one sport in college. Each campus determines their own eligibility requirements. Local examples: Menlo, Mills & UC Santa Cruz K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

25 Division III Division III colleges and universities develop student-athlete potential through a holistic educational approach that includes rigorous academics, competitive athletics and opportunity to pursue many interests and passions. Student-athletes are responsible for their own paths and are provided with many opportunities to develop within a comprehensive educational experience. Division III minimizes the conflicts between athletics and academics through shorter playing and practicing seasons, a lower number of contests, no redshirting or out-of- season organized activities, and a focus on regional in-season and conference play. Division III college-bound student-athletes are not certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center because Division III colleges and universities each set their own admissions standards and there are no initial-eligibility requirements in the division. College bound student-athletes should contact their Division III college or university regarding policies on admission, financial aid and athletics eligibility. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

26 Academic Differences Division IDivision IIDivision III Graduate from High School Complete 16 Core CoursesComplete 14 Core Courses (16 will be required as of Aug. 1, 2013) Not certified by NCAA Earn a minimum required gpa in the Core Courses Earn at least a 2.0 gpa in the Core Courses Set their own admission standards Earn a combined SAT/ACT score that matches the Core Course gpa Earn a combined SAT score of 820 (w/o writing) or a 68 ACT sum score downloads/CBSA.pdf K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

27 NAIA National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics seeks to fully integrate life, academics, sport and fitness into the higher education environment. 300 colleges & universities in the US & Canada (College of Bahamas) More relaxed rules, especially related to transferring Athletic scholarships Joined Eligibility Center (2010) 23 National Championships in 13 sports 60,000 student athletes Eligibility requirements: 18 ACT/860 SAT, 3.0 Cumulative GPA at the end of Junior year, or graduate in the top half of class Local examples: Maritime, Fresno Pacific, Holy Names, Patten, and William Jessup K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

28 NAIA K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

29 ESTABLISHING ELIGIBILITY CORE COURSES WEIGHTED GRADES THE WORKSHEET Academic Eligibility K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

30 How Does a Student Establish NCAA Academic Eligibility? K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

31 K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

32 DIVISION I 16 Core-Course Rule DIVISION I 16 Core-Course Rule DIVISION II 14 Core-Course Rule (16 will be required as of Aug. 1, 2013) DIVISION II 14 Core-Course Rule (16 will be required as of Aug. 1, 2013) 4 years of English. 3 years of Mathematics (Algebra I or higher). 2 years of Natural/Physical Science (1 year of lab if offered by high school). 1 year of additional English, Mathematics or Natural/Physical Science. 2 years of Social Science. 4 years of additional courses (from any area above, Foreign Language or non- doctrinal Religion/Philosophy). 3 years of English. 2 years of Mathematics (Algebra I or higher). 2 years of Natural/Physical Science (1 year of lab if offered by high school). 2 years of additional English, Mathematics or Natural/Physical Science. 2 years of Social Science. 3 years of additional courses (from any area above, Foreign Language or non-doctrinal Religion/Philosophy). tandards pdf Core Courses K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

33 Weighted Grades/ AP and Honors Classes The NCAA rules state that weighted grades may be used by the Eligibility Center. Weighting may be applied to courses whose titles indicate they are Honors, AP/IB, or advanced. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

34 GPA Calculation How is the Core GPA Calculated? Examples of total quality point calculation: Calculate the Overall Grade-Point Average The Eligibility Center calculates the grade-point average of a students core courses on a Scale. An A grade (4 points) for a trimester course (0.34 units): 4 points x 0.34 units = 1.36 total quality points To calculate the estimated core-course grade- point average, divide the total number of points for all core courses by the total number of core-course units completed. The best grades from a students NCAA core courses will be used to satisfy the core course requirements. An A grade (4 points) for a semester course (0.50 units): 4 points x 0.50 units = 2.00 total quality points Grades from additional core courses will be used only if the grades improve a students core GPA. An A grade (4 points) for a full-year course (1.00 units): 4 points x 1.00 units = 4.00 quality points To determine points earned for each course, multiply the points for the grade by the amount of credit earned. A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1 g_and_GPA/CalculationoftheCoreGPA.pdf the Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when calculating core course GPA. For example, grades of B+, B and B- will all be worth 3 quality points each. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

35 The Div. I Worksheet K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

36 BYUOnline Classes Dont Count Anymore….Wait…they will again soon, we hope! K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

37 The Role of the Guidance Counselor Promptly fax or mail transcripts to all college coaches who request them for each student-athlete (must have release form from student). Suggest that the student consult with his/her high school and/or club coach for direction of which Division to pursue. Listen for what the student-athlete wants in his/her collegiate sports experience and compare that to the college programs the student-athlete is considering (and share this info with the student). K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

38 The Role of the Student-Athlete Do as well as he/she can in schooleven after committing to a college. Stay healthy (sleep, deal effectively with injuries, eat well). Know what you are looking forbig fish in a little pond? Or little fish in big pond? Does the student want to play right away?? Does the student want to be on an established team/part of a storied program? K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

39 The Role of the Parent Use your life experiences to benefit your child reading between the lines of slick coaches. Check out websites of the targeted schools to see how many current student-athletes play the same position as your child; How many are freshman and sophomores? Keep the student athlete calm during the hype and during coaches pressure tactics. K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

40 Other Thoughts…. Its never too late for a student-athlete to start marketing himself/herself to college sports programs! There is more to life than Division I! Stress the overall fitdoes the school have the academic program the student wants? Is the location appropriate? Is the size of the school right for the student? What if the sports program disappears or the student suffers an injury? Will the student want to stay at that college? K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

41 RECRUITING REGULATIONS JUNIOR YEAR RECRUITING METHODS COLLEGE COACHES PET PEEVES The Athletic Recruiting Process K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

42 K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

43 K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

44 TOP 10 COACHES PET PEEVES 1. Parents send s instead of athlete. 2. Parents call instead of athlete. 3. Parents call and ask us to call them back when its against the NCAA recruiting rules. 4. Use of recruiting services. 5. Game playing in the process. 6. Sending hours of video or testimonial. 7. Trying to engage us in conversation at tournaments when its illegal. 8. Not taking no for an honest answer. 9. Sending information on their high school athletics only. 10. The myth that everyone gets a full ride or a scholarship. (Information polled from CAL assistant coaches in all sports 2009) K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/

45 Thank you! K. Oden & J. Thomas, 2/


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