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Gary Clinton MS, AT/C, AT/L Sports Medicine Instructor Yelm HS WCTSMA President.

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Presentation on theme: "Gary Clinton MS, AT/C, AT/L Sports Medicine Instructor Yelm HS WCTSMA President."— Presentation transcript:

1 Gary Clinton MS, AT/C, AT/L Sports Medicine Instructor Yelm HS WCTSMA President

2 If a patient is suspected of Exertional Heat Stroke, what should be the first action taken in treatment of the condition? A) Drive them to the hospital by parent/yourself. B) Contact EMS and wait for them to arrive. Dont move athlete. C) Get them a bottle of water and put ice towels on them. D) Apply Biofreeze to the entire body. E) Contact EMS, but place athlete in cold water immersion and stir the water aggressively before transport.

3 Isaiah Laurencin- FL, Exertional Sickling Tyquan Xavier Brantley- SC, Exertional Sickling Lewis Ogloba- PA, Asthma led to Cardiac Arrest DJ Searcy- GA, Heat related Forrest Jones- GA, Heat stroke Montel Williams- AR, Exertional Sickling Sam Dickson- PA, (Congenital)Coronary Artery Al Smith, Jr.- TX, unknown, 2 nd day of FB practice Latrell Dunbar-MS, Cardiac Event Candace Ortiz- TX, unknown Angela Gettis- CA, Cardiac Event

4 David Stinson, head coach Pleasure Ridge Park HS criminally charged in death of 15 year old, Aug. 20 th All coaches present, AD who was present, and Principal were named in a separate civil lawsuit. Reckless Homicide- When a person fails to perceive a risk that a reasonable person in that situation would have seen. Another player that day also collapsed and spent 2 days in the hospital. Coach alleged to have withheld water and continued practice with a heat index of 94. Coach would run the players until someone quit the team. It took 15 minutes to call 911.

5 Coach Stinson was on paid administrative leave, reassigned, no longer coaches. Community & school district torn apart. Coach Stinson was acquitted of criminal charges. Civil suit was settled out of court for 1.75 million dollars.

6 Focuses on two issues in HS Football Concussions Heat Stroke Arkansas, 2010 Two heat stroke scenarios 1 died (Tyler Davenport) 1 lived (Will James) What was the difference in care? Frontline- No one should die of Heatstroke

7 A set of guidelines that safely prepares athletes for competition. Released by the NATA in 2009 for Secondary Schools. NFHS A guide to Heat Acclimatization & Heat Illness Prevention released this summer. 7 components of plan released by NFHS this summer. 100% of heat related deaths are preventable!! WIAA currently has no guidelines? Korey Stringer Institute is pushing for all 50 states to adopt guidelines for all high schools. NCAA has had guidelines in place since One collegiate death in August since inception! Acclimatization is not conditioning

8 No more than 1 practice per day. No longer than 3 hours 1 hour max. ( walk thru) permitted after 3 hours minimum rest. Football: Days 1 & 2 Helmets only Days 3-5 Helmets & shoulder pads only

9 Double practice days followed by a single On single days, 1 walk thru permitted w/3 hrs rest. Rest day doesnt count towards 14 day total. Doubles dont exceed 3 hours for each. Not to exceed 5 hours total. All activities included as practice time: conditioning, walk thru, weight room, etc. Recommend certified AT onsite for all practices.

10 Area of Practice Modification Practices 1-5 Practices 6-14 Days 1-2Days 3-5 # of Practices Permitted Per Day 12, only every other day EquipmentHelmets only Helmets & Shoulder Pads Full Equipment Maximum Duration of Single Practice Session 3 hours 3 hours (a total maximum of 5 hours on double session days) Permitted Walk Through Time 1 hour (but must be separated from practice for 3 continuous hours) ContactNo Contact Contact only with blocking sleds/dummies Full, 100% live contact drills NOTE: warm-up, stretching, cool-down, walk-through, conditioning, and weight- room activities are Included as part of practice time Secondary School Guidelines Preseason Heat-Acclimatization Guidelines for Secondary School Athletics. Journal of Athletic Training. 2009;44(3):

11 National Athletic Trainers Association American College of Sports Medicine Gatorade Sports Science Institute National Strength and Conditioning Association US Army Research Institute for Environmental Medicine American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine American Medical Society for Sports Medicine American Academy of Pediatrics Korey Stringer Institute is doing extensive research

12 New Jersey, first to adopt heat guidelines From 1995 through 2008, 39 football players died of heatstroke. Second most common cause of death for high school athletes, after spinal cord injury. Currently 7 states meeting guidelines WA has guidelines but is classified by KSI as deficient.

13 EAPs in place Earlier AM full gear practices Shells for later PM practices, install Emphasize pre-practice hydration Efficient hydration available Athlete differences Discourage supplements, caffeine & stimulants Lower intensity & increase breaks whenever necessary

14 Heat exhaustion symptoms include: Paleness Cramping Heavy sweating Fainting or nausea Fast or shallow breathing Dizziness The pulse rate is fast and weak. Core body temperature below 104 degrees

15 Heatstroke symptoms include both physical and neurological manifestationsa fast pulse and extremely high temperature (above 104 degrees) coupled with confusion or hallucination. NFHS recommends taking WBGT at location People may experience nausea, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of balance, irritability, irrational or unusual behavior, apathy, hysteria, and headaches, as well as dizziness and disorientation.

16 With NEHS, the body stops or decreases sweat production so the skin feels hot and dry. With EHS, the body can still produce sweat, so the skin can be moist though the core temperature remains just as high. Sometimes, there will be no clear evidence of a problem until the athlete collapses.

17 Is the only valid measure of body temperature. Can only be measured rectally or with an ingestible thermometer (Gastrointestinal).

18 What if I dont have/dont want to measure temperature rectally? Common sense: Signs & Symptoms Fast pulse Confusion Nausea Disorientation Altered level of Consciousness Irrational/Unusual Behavior Dizziness Loss of Balance

19 Activate EAP Call 911, but… Cool the body rapidly, before transport Remove from heat Cold water immersion If not available: Douse with cold water Ice bags/towels, rotate : 3 mins. Put in any available water source

20 Goal is to get body temperature below 102 degrees within 30 minutes. Water temperature between degrees. Ice always visible on surface Continuously stirred. Cooling rate in general is 1 degree: 3 minutes. Basic guideline: Water temp of degree minutes of immersion time

21 Muscle Cramping Pain Swelling Weakness Tenderness Inability to catch breath Fatigue Affects athletes with Sickle Cell Trait

22 Longer periods of recovery within conditioning Excluded from performance tests Timed mile run & serial sprints Adjust work-rest cycles during hotter days Emphasize hydration Dont work out if feeling ill Control asthma Have supplemental oxygen available

23 Study of hydration 1. Proper pre practice hydration ½ given water ½ withheld water No significant difference in core temperature! 2. Start practice dehydrated ½ given water ½ withheld water Significant difference in core temperature Emphasis needs to be on effective hydration by the athlete!

24 Asthma Catastrophic Brain Injuries Cervical Spine injuries Diabetes Exertional Heat Stroke Exertional Hyponatremia Exertional Sickling Lightning Head-down contact Sudden Cardiac Arrest 10 Most common conditions with treatment and Emergency Action Plans included.

25 If a patient is suspected of Exertional Heat Stroke, what should be the 1st action taken in treatment of the condition? A) Drive them to the hospital by parent/yourself. B) Contact EMS and wait for them to arrive. Dont move athlete. C) Get them a bottle of water and put ice towels on them. D) Apply Biofreeze to the entire body. E) Contact EMS, but place athlete in cold water immersion and stir the water aggressively before transport.

26 Korey Stringer Institute, EAPs CWI guidelines Exertional Heat Stroke survival kit Rectal Probes & thermometers Hydration kits Hot weather practice procedures outline State athletic association guidelines

27 Binkley HM, Beckett J, Casa DJ, Kleiner DM, Plummer PE. National Athletic Trainers Association position statement: exertional heat illnesses. J Athletic Training. 2002; 37(3):329–343. Casa DJ, Guskiewicz KM, Anderson SA, Courson RW, Heck JF, Jimenez CC, McDermott BP, Miller MG, Stearns RL, Swartz EE, Walsh KM. National Athletic Trainers Association position statement: preventing sudden death in sports. J Athletic Training. 2011; 47(1):96–118. Casa DJ, McDermott BM, Lee EC, Yeargin SW, Armstrong LE, Maresh CM. Cold-water immersion: The gold standard for exertional heat stroke treatment. Exercise and Sports Science Reviews. 2007; 35(3): Heatstroke. eMedicine website. Updated September Updated September 2009

28 Mueller FO, Colgate B. Annual survey of football injury research 1931– The American Football Coaches Association, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and the National Federation of State High School Associations. No sweat: Recognizing and preventing heat-related illnesses. CMA Today. 2010; 43(4) July/August. Understanding heat-related illness: symptoms. WebMD. illness-symptoms. Yeargin SW, Casa DJ, Judelson DA, McDermott BP, Ganio MS, Lee EC, Lopez RM, Stearns RL, Anderson JM, Armstrong LE, Kraemer WJ, Maresh CM. Thermoregulatory Responses and Hydration Practices in Heat-Acclimatized Adolescents During Preseason High School Football. J Athletic Training. 2010; 45(2): 136–146.

29 Gary Clinton MS, AT/C, AT/L Sports Medicine Instructor Yelm HS WCTSMA President (360)


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