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Religious movement is much of the Baroque art in Catholic countries associated: The Counter-Reformation. List three adjectives or phrases that describe.

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Presentation on theme: "Religious movement is much of the Baroque art in Catholic countries associated: The Counter-Reformation. List three adjectives or phrases that describe."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Religious movement is much of the Baroque art in Catholic countries associated: The Counter-Reformation. List three adjectives or phrases that describe its style: Dramatic theatricality. Grandiose scale. Elaborate ornateness.

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4 Carlo Maderno Santa Susana Rome, Italy

5 Giacomo della Porta façade of Il Gesù Rome, Italy ca

6 Giacomo della Porta façade of Il Gesù Rome, Italy ca Three ways in which Maderns Early Baroque church of Santa Susanna resembles the church of Il Gesu: Each building has scroll buttresses connecting the upper and lower levels of the façade. Each building has two pediments, one for each story. Sculptures in niches frame the central doorway in each building. Carlo Maderno Santa Susana Rome, Italy Three ways in which Maderns Early Baroque church of Santa Susanna differs from the church of Il Gesu: The façade has a greater verticality, concentrating and dramatizing the major features of its model. The façades tall central section projects forward from the horizontal lower story. Strong shadows cast by the vigorously projecting columns and pilasters mount dramatically toward the emphatically stressed central axis.

7 Carlo Maderno Santa Susana Rome, Italy

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9 Four architects who worked on St. Peter's and note the primary contribution of each. Donato dAngelo Bramante: The original plan and the concept of a hemispherical dome. Michelangelo: The reduced plan and the ogival dome with drum. Carlo Maderno: the façade. Gianlorenzo Bernini: the colonnaded piazza.

10 Carlo Maderno Aerial view of Saint Peters Vatican City, Rome, Italy

11 Gianlorenzo Bernini baldacchino Saint Peters Vatican City, Rome, Italy gilded bronze approximately 100 ft. high Baldacchino Canopy-like structure on columns, frequently built over an altar.

12 Gianlorenzo Bernini Scala Regia Vatican City, Rome, Italy

13 Gianlorenzo Bernini David 1623 marble approximately 5 ft. 7 in. high Four major characteristics of Bernini's sculpture that are typical of Baroque art in general. Expansive and theatrical. The element of time usually plays an important role. Dynamic quality conveying a bursting forth of energy. Refusal to limit itself to firmly defined spatial settings.

14 Gianlorenzo Bernini David 1623 marble approximately 5 ft. 7 in. high

15 Bernini Michelangelo Buonarroti Donatello Michelangelo's is shown before, Bernini's is during and Donatello's is after the fight with Goliath. Michelangelo and Bernini depict David as more of a man, Donatello shows him as a young boy, also lots of sexual symbolism in Donatello's, like the feather from Goliath's hat running up David's inner thigh. Donatello's is bronze, the other 2 are marble. Donatello's is very early Renaissance- he is going towards more realistic features, as is seen in the pouchy stomach and saggy behind of David. Michelangelo's musculature is consistent with the thoughts of the Renaissance: a look back at idealized figures and tension-creating scenes- he hasn't fought yet, we still don't know what will happen. Bernini is working in a more baroque style, combing motion and concentration (in David's face) to achieve a dynamism in the work not found in the earlier

16 Gianlorenzo Bernini interior of the Cornaro Chapel Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome, Italy

17 Gianlorenzo Bernini Ecstasy of Saint Theresa Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome, Italy Bernini depiction of the vision of St. Theresa: As light (shining from behind a hidden window of yellow glass) pouring down on bronze rays suggesting the radiance of Heaven.

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19 Francesco Borromini façade of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane Rome, Italy Who developed thesculptural architectural style to its extreme? Francesco Borromoni.

20 Francesco Borromini façade of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane Rome, Italy Two buildings designed by him. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane. Chapel of Saint Ivo. Both are located in the city of Rome.

21 Francesco Borromini plan of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane Rome, Italy While the circle had been the ideal geometric figure to Renaissance architects, Baroque planners preferred the oval.

22 Francesco Borromini dome of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane Rome, Italy They preferred the oval because the oval is a more dynamic form of the circle, creating an interior that appears to flow from entrance to altar, unimpeded by the segmentation characteristic of Renaissance buildings.

23 Francesco Borromini Chapel of Saint Ivo College of the Sapienza Rome, Italy begun 1642

24 Francesco Borromini plan of the Chapel of Saint Ivo College of the Sapienza Rome, Italy begun 1642

25 Francesco Borromini dome of the Chapel of Saint Ivo College of the Sapienza Rome, Italy begun 1642

26 Francesco Borromini dome of the Chapel of Saint Ivo College of the Sapienza Rome, Italy begun 1642

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28 Guarino Guarini Palazzo Carignano Turin, Italy

29 Guarino Guarini Palazzo Carignano Turin, Italy

30 Guarino Guarini Chapel of Santissima Sindone Turin, Italy

31 Guarino Guarini Chapel of Santissima Sindone Turin, Italy

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33 Bramante and Raphael Dome of Sant Eligio degli Orefici Rome, Italy ca. 1509, reconstructed ca. 1600

34 Caravaggio Conversion of Saint Paul Cerasi Chapel, Santa Maria del Popolo Rome, Italy ca oil on canvas approximately 7 ft. 6 in. x 5 ft. 9 in. Three characteristics of Caravaggio's style. Injected naturalism into both religious and classical subjects with unidealized figures. Sharply, dramatically lit figures emerging from a dark background. Invites the viewer to participate in the scene.

35 Caravaggio Conversion of Saint Paul Gianlorenzo Bernini Ecstasy of Saint Theresa The common purpose of Caravaggio's Conversion of St. Paul and Bernini's The Ecstasy of St. Theresa: To produce the representation of a vision, using actual light from each chapels windows.

36 Caravaggio Calling of Saint Matthew Contarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Francesci Rome, Italy ca oil on canvas 11 ft. 1 in. x 11 ft. 5 in. Caravaggio attempted to compel the viewers interest and involvement in the scene in his religious pictures. Caravaggio accomplished this by using pictorial devices such as showing action taking place in the foreground; low horizon line; dramatic light.

37 Tenebroso Shadowy manner of dark settings enveloping their occupants.

38 Caravaggio David Victorious over Goliath oil on canvas 43 1/4 x 35 7/8 in.

39 Caravaggio Entombment Chapel of Pietro Vittrice, Santa Maria in Vallicella Rome, Italy ca oil on canvas 9 ft. 10 1/8 in. x 6 ft. 15/16 in.

40 Self-Portrait as a Martyr

41 Artemisia Gentileschi Judith Slaying Holofernes ca oil on canvas 6 ft. 6 1/3 in. x 5 ft. x 4 in. Characters from the Apocryphal Book of Judith; Holofernes was an Assyrian general who was seduced by Judith and then beheaded by her. Techniques: Artemesia uses tenebrism, spurting blood, the physical strain of the women struggling with the sword, and controlled highlights on the action in the foreground to portray the drama of the theme.

42 Judith Slaying Holofernes (Caravaggio). c Oil on canvas 1.44m by 1.92m Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, Barberini, Rome. The artists most influenced the style of Artemesia Gentileschi was Caravaggio and her father, Orazio Gentileschi.

43 Artemisia Gentileschi Judith and her Maidservant ca oil on canvas 44 7/8 x 36 13/16 in. One of Artemisia's best works, this scene is tense with imminent danger as Judith and Abra prepare to flee Holofernes's tent with his severed head. Dramatic and unusual chiaroscuro, especially the shadows Judith's hand casts on her face, together with vigilant expressions and posture, add urgency to the scene.

44 Jael and Sisera Oil on canvas m by 1.275m Szepmuveszeti Museum, Budapest. Artemisia chose another biblical theme picturing a woman slaying an aggressor. Sisera was a cruel Canaanite leader who ruled the Israelites for twenty years. Barak defeated his nine hundred charioteers by a surprise Israelite attack. Sisera escaped and sought refuge in the tent of Jael, wife of Heber the Kenite. She gave the terrified Canaanite sanctuary. When he fell asleep, she drove a tent peg into his brain. The act fulfilled the prediction of Debora, prophetess and Israelite leader, who foresaw that a woman would slay Sisera.

45 Artemisia Gentileschi Susannah and the Elders 1610 oil on canvas 66 7/8 x 46 7/8 in.

46 Three assumptions that were basic to the teaching of art at the Bolognese academy. Art can be taught. The teaching of art must include the classical and Renaissance traditions. The teaching must also include the study of anatomy and life drawing.

47 Annibale Carracci Flight into Egypt oil on canvas 4 ft. x 7 ft. x 6 in. Annibale Carracci is credited with developing the "classical" or "ideal" landscape Its roots were the landscape backgrounds of Venetian Renaissance paintings.

48 Annibale Carracci Loves of the Gods Gallery, Palazzo Farnese Rome, Italy fresco Carracci achieved heightened illusionism as the chiaroscuro is not the same for both the paintings and the figures surrounding them. The painter modeled the figures inside the quadri in an even light. The outside figures seem to be lit from beneath, as if they were actual three-dimensional beings or statues illuminated from below.

49 Annibale Carracci Loves of the Gods Gallery, Palazzo Farnese Rome, Italy fresco

50 Annibale Carracci Loves of the Gods, Triumph of Bacchus Gallery, Palazzo Farnese Rome, Italy fresco quadro riportato Transferred frame painting, or simulation of easel painting for ceiling decoration. The framed pictures are flanked by polychrome figures who turn their heads to gaze at the scenes around them, and by Atlas figures painted to resemble marble statues.

51 Annibale Carracci Loves of the Gods Polyphemus, Acis and Galatea Gallery, Palazzo Farnese Rome, Italy fresco

52 Guido Reni Aurora Ceiling fresco in the Casino Rospigliosi, Rome, Italy fresco Two influences blended by Reni in his Aurora fresco: Roman reliefs. Coins depicting emperors in triumphal chariots accompanied by flying Victories and other personifications.

53 Pietro da Cortona Triumph of the Barberini ceiling fresco in the Gran Salone Palazzo Barberini, Rome, Italy fresco

54 Pietro da Cortona Triumph of the Barberini ceiling fresco in the Gran Salone Palazzo Barberini, Rome, Italy fresco Three ways in which Pietro da Cortonas frescoed ceiling in the Palazzo Barberini praised his patron: Divine Providence holds a crown of stars to bestow eternal life on the Barberini family. The laurel wreath, another symbol of immortality. The papal tiara and keys announcing the personal triumphs of Urban VIII.

55 Giacomo della Porta façade of Il Gesù Rome, Italy ca

56 Giovanni Battista Gaulli Triumph in the Name of Jesus ceiling fresco with stucco figures in the vault of Il Gesu, Rome, Italy fresco Effect Gaulli created with the fresco he painted on the ceiling of Il Gesù in Rome: A dramatic, transcendent spiritual environment as well as the glory and power of the Catholic Church. Three devices he used to achieve that effect: Gilded architecture opens up in the center of the ceiling to offer viewers a glimpse of Heaven. Jesus is represented as a barely visible monogram in a blinding radiant light that floats heavenward. Gaulli painted many of the sinners on three-dimensional stucco extensions that project outside the paintings dome.

57 Fra Andrea Pozzo Glorification of Saint Ignatius ceiling fresco with stucco figures in the nave of SantIgnazio, Rome, Italy fresco The painter beside Gaulli who worked for the Jesuits in Rome was Fra Andrea Pozzo. He painted the ceiling of the church of SantIgnazio in Rome­ for them. The device did he use to merge heaven and earth was he illusionistically continued the churchs own architecture into the vault so that the roof seems to be lifted off.

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59 Fra Andrea Pozzo Glorification of Saint Ignatius ceiling fresco with stucco figures in the nave of SantIgnazio, Rome, Italy fresco

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61 José de Ribera Martyrdom of Saint Philip (Bartholomew) ca oil on canvas 7 ft. 8 in. x 7 ft. 8 in. The goal of many Spanish Baroque religious artists was to move viewers and to encourage greater devotion and piety. A theme that was particularly popular among them was death and martyrdom scenes. Ribera's style was influenced by the "dark manner" of Caravaggio.

62 Francisco de Zurbarán Saint Serapion 1628 oil on canvas 3 ft. 11 1/2 in. x 3 ft. 4 3/4 in. The type of lighting did Zurbaran use in his pating of Saint Serapion was Bright light shining on the figure with a dark background, to call attention to the saints death and to increase the dramatic impact of the image.

63 Francisco de Zurbarán Still Life with Pottery Jars oil on canvas 18 1/8 x 33 1/8 in.

64 Francisco de Zurbarán Agnus Dei oil on canvas 15 x 24 3/8 in.

65 Alonso Cano Saint Bernard and the Virgin oil on canvas 105 1/8 x 72 7/8 in.

66 Bartolomé Esteban Murillo The Immaculate Virgin of Soult c oil on canvas 107 7/8 x 74 3/4 in.

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68 Diego Velázquez Water Carrier of Seville ca oil on canvas 3 ft. 5 1/2 in. x 2 ft. 7 1/2 in. Velazquez was court painter to King Phillip IV.

69 Diego Velázquez Los Borrachos ca oil on canvas 64 3/8 x 87 7/8 in.

70 Diego Velázquez Surrender of Breda oil on canvas 10 ft. 1 in. x 12 ft. 1/2 in. Velasquezs Surrender of Breda commemorate the Spanish victory over the Dutch in 1625.

71 Diego Velázquez King Philip IV of Spain (Fraga Philip) 1644 oil on canvas 4 ft. 3 1/8 in. x 3 ft. 1/8 in.

72 Diego Velázquez Las Meninas 1656 oil on canvas approximately 10 ft. 9 in. x 9 ft. The subject of Las Meninas is the Infanta Margarita with her two maids-in-waiting, her favorite dwarfs, and a large dog, as well as a man and a woman in the background. The composition extends in depth both in front of (through the mirror and the gazes of the figures) and behind the painting (through the open door). Form and shadow are represented realistically. A great number of intermediate values of gray come between lights and darks, instead of putting them side by side as Caravaggio did.

73 Diego Velázquez Las Meninas 1656 oil on canvas approximately 10 ft. 9 in. x 9 ft.

74 Diego Velázquez Las Meninas 1656 oil on canvas approximately 10 ft. 9 in. x 9 ft.

75 Diego Velázquez Las Meninas 1656 oil on canvas approximately 10 ft. 9 in. x 9 ft.

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