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USDA - Natural Resources Conservation Service FY 2012 Financial Assistance Programs Available for Woodland Owners.

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Presentation on theme: "USDA - Natural Resources Conservation Service FY 2012 Financial Assistance Programs Available for Woodland Owners."— Presentation transcript:

1 USDA - Natural Resources Conservation Service FY 2012 Financial Assistance Programs Available for Woodland Owners

2 This program addresses identified natural resource concerns, including those related to forestland such as, Sheet and Rill Erosion, Noxious and Invasive Plants, T&E Declining Plant Species, and many, many more. This is a cost-share program that offers payment rates of 75% and 90% (of the average state cost) to install specific conservation practices. Some of those practices include:

3 Practice NameComponentUnit TypeUnit Cost PRESCRIBED BURNING Must currently have a basal area of 80sqft/acre or less. Exceptions MUST be based on the documented recommendation of an NRCS forester, NRCS biologist, or partner biologist. Burn plan must be prepared by a Certified Forester, Consulting Forester, or TSP. Acre19.50 FIREBREAKSFire Breaks. Apply the practice according to the Conservation practice standard.LnFt0.21 TREE/SHRUB SITE PREPARATIONMechanical Site Prep. Apply the practice according to the Conservation Practice Standard.Acre TREE/SHRUB SITE PREPARATION Burn. For the establishment of trees and shrubs on cropland, pasture or hayland. Must be part of a plan that includes Tree and Shrub Establishment (612).A burn plan must be prepared by a Certified Forester, Consulting Forester, or TSPAcre18.75 TREE/SHRUB SITE PREPARATION Site Prep Chemical for tree and shrub establishment. For the establishment of trees and shrubs on cropland, pasture or hayland. Must be part of a plan that includes Tree and Shrub Establishment (612). Practice requires WinPST assessmentAcre75.00 TREE/SHRUB SITE PREPARATION Herbaceous Weed Control for tree and shrub establishment. For the establishment of trees and shrubs on cropland, pasture or hayland. Must be part of a plan that includes Tree and Shrub Establishment (612). Practice requires WinPST assessmentAcre30.00 TREE/SHRUB SITE PREPARATION Subsoil for Plow Hardpan. (This is required for planting of longleafs into fallow fields, cropland and pastureland.)Acre23.06 TREE/SHRUB SITE PREPARATIONScalping. Apply the practice according to the Conservation Practice StandardAcre15.38 TREE/SHRUB ESTABLISHMENT Tree Planting Loblolly Pine. Survival rate should be a minimum of 300 trees per acre after year one. Apply the practice according to the Conservation Practice StandardAcre55.09 TREE/SHRUB ESTABLISHMENT Tree Planting Longleaf Pine. Planting rates are limited to 622 trees per acre or less at a maxiumum 7X10 spacing.Acre99.45 TREE/SHRUB ESTABLISHMENTTree Planting Native Hardwood species, includes native fruit trees, flowering species.Acre68.85 TREE/SHRUB ESTABLISHMENTTree ShelterNo2.34 FOREST TRAILS AND LANDINGSTraversable Waterbar and Dip. Apply the practice according to the Conservation Practice StandardNo75.53 FOREST STAND IMPROVEMENT Forest Stand Improvement for Wildlife - Removal of competition by herbicide or harvest. Use WHIG. For pine stands, planned basal area must be 80 sq/ft/acre, or less. Apply according to Practice Standard.Acre45.00 FOREST STAND IMPROVEMENT Forest Stand Improvement (Mechanical) removal of dense under brush woody competition on forest land, for pine stands, planned basal area must be 80 sq/ft/ac or less. Use the WHIG to document the need for creating diversity within the planning area.Acre228.50

4 This program specifically addresses wildlife related resource concerns such as, T&E Declining Species, Inadequate Cover/Shelter, Inadequate Food or Space, Habitat Fragmentation, and others. This is a cost-share program that offers payment rates of 75% and 90% (of the average state cost) to install specific conservation practices. Some of those practices in addition to the ones listed under EQIP include:

5 Practice NameComponentUnit TypeUnit Cost HERBACEOUS WEED CONTROL Terrestrial herbaceous invasive species, See SC Major Invasive Species of Concern list for invasive species that can be cost shared. Practice requires WinPST assessment and mitigation documentation as necessaryAcre HERBACEOUS WEED CONTROL Site Prep-Chemical for wildlife habitat (conversion to native herbaceous groundcover). Apply the Practice according to the Conservation Practice StandardAcre94.13 CONSERVATION COVER Introduced Species (Planting 1 or more introduced or native species). No Invasive Species, See South Carolina Conservation Cover Technical Guide 327b, Introduced Species for GuidanceAcre CONSERVATION COVER Native Warm Season Grasses (3 species) See South Carolina Conservation Cover Technical Guide 327a, Using Native Species, for GuidanceAcre CONSERVATION COVER Native Herbaceous Cover (2 or more Native Grasses and 2 or more Native Legumes/Forbs) See South Carolina Conservation Cover Technical Guide 327a, Using Native Species, for Guidance.Acre CONSERVATION COVER Legumes (Native preferred) See South Carolina Conservation Cover Technical Guides 327 a and b for Guidance.Acre CONSERVATION COVER Flowering plants for pollinators (Plant a mix of 1 species of grass and 9 species of forbs, herb and/or flowering shrubs native to southeast U.S.) See Pollinator Technical Guide 327c, for GuidanceAcre FIELD BORDER Native Species (For wildlife benefit, See South Carolina Conservation Cover Technical Guide 327a Using Native Species, for Guidance). Apply the practice according to the Conservation practice standard.Acre FIELD BORDER Planted Introduced Species (For wildlife benefit, See South Carolina Conservation Cover Technical Guide 327b Using Introduced Species, for Guidance). Apply the practice according to the Conservation practice standard.Acre RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OF DECLINING SPECIES Planting local ecotype native grass and forbs, and wiregrass (seeds or plugs) for community restoration, must be planned in conjunction with Conservation Cover 327 practice. Apply the practice according to the Conservation Practice StandardAcre UPLAND WILDLIFE HABITAT MANAGEMENTNesting /Roosting Structures for Birds/BatsEach38.63 EARLY SUCCESSIONAL WILDLIFE HABITATRotational Disking (Payment on Only those acres actually disked each year)Acre24.48

6 This program focuses specifically on the re- establishment of the native Longleaf Pine ecosystem National Initiative that includes 9 states where Longleaf Pine has a historic range Practices offered include: Tree/Shrub Establishment Prescribed Burning Forest Stand Improvement Restoration and Management of Rare and Declining Habitats

7 Firebreaks Tree/Shrub Site Preparation Forest Trails and Landings Upland Wildlife Habitat Management Wetland Wildlife Habitat Management Early Successional Habitat Development/Mgt. Access Control Pest Management Conservation Cover Brush Management Herbaceous Weed Control

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9 This program rewards those landowners that are already practicing good conservation by offering financial assistance to enhance existing conservation activities. This is an annual payment program and the rates are calculated based on points that the application receives. Some of the enhancements offered include:

10 ANM15Forest stand improvement for Wildlife Habitat and Soil Quality Creating snags, den trees, and coarse woody debris on the forest floor to a level optimum for native wildlife usage and long-term forest soil health. May be implemented separately or during thinning or harvesting ANM18Retrofit watering facility for wildlife escape Retrofit existing watering facilities (troughs, tanks, etc.) to allow for escape of wildlife that become trapped while trying to drink. ANM19Wildlife corridors Wildlife corridors are linear strips of vegetation that connect 2 or more patches of suitable wildlife habitat. Participants will establish vegetative corridors as described below. ANM20Silvopasture for wildlife habitatManage silvopastures to promote plant diversity for wildlife habitat. PLT01Establish pollinator habitat Establish nectar and pollen producing plants in non-cropped areas such as field borders, vegetative barriers, contour buffer strips, waterways, shelterbelts, windbreaks, conservation cover, and riparian forest and herbaceous buffers. PLT03Forest stand improvement, pre-treating vegetation and fuels Manage vegetation and fuels in a forested area with mechanical/manual methods to facilitate future treatment with prescribed fire to restore native forest condition. PLT04Forest stand improvement, prescribed burning Prescribed use of fire in a forest to restore native forest conditions with a focus on improving the condition of fire-adapted plants and wildlife habitat and reducing the risk of damage from intense, severe wildfires. PLT05 Multi-story cropping, sustainable management of non-timber forest plants Manipulation of forest species composition, structure, and canopy cover to achieve or maintain a desired native plant community to facilitate the sustainable management of native non-timber forest plant(s) (e.g., goldenseal, ramps, mushrooms, ginseng, ferns, sugarbush, etc.). PLT07Hardwood crop tree release Hardwood Crop Tree Release (CTR) in hardwood stands is a silvicultural technique used to enhance the performance of individual trees, while improving other objectives such as wildlife management, recreation, timber value, and aesthetics. PLT11Conifer Crop Tree Release A silvicultural technique for western softwood forests used to enhance the performance of individual trees, while improving other objectives such as wildlife management, recreation, timber value, and aesthetics. PLT12Patch Harvesting Patch Harvesting is a silvicultural practice used to naturally regenerate over-mature and/or degraded hardwood stands while providing added cover and browse for several game and non-game species of wildlife. PLT13Forest Stand Improvement for Wildfire Reduction Requiring landowners to approach wildfire management by establishing fire lines (where appropriate and applicable), fuel breaks (where appropriate and applicable), develop an approved fire plan which would include plan to maintain critical access roads, scouting, access control, identification of water sources, critical contacts, training and posting of plans and phone numbers. PLT14 Alley cropping establishment for wildlife and beneficial insect habitat Planting trees or shrubs in alternating rows with row crops, forage or horticultural crops in areas between the rows, providing plant diversity, improve soil quality and wildlife habitat. SQL08Forest Stand Improvement for Soil QualityThe management of the forest to improve the soil quality in the forest.

11 This program focuses on the restoration and enhancement of forest ecosystems for threatened/endangered species. In SC, the program focuses on Longleaf Pine Ecosystems and the protection of the Red-cockaded Woodpecker. This program offers permanent or 30-year easements and 10-year cost share agreements.

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13 STEP 1: Contact your local NRCS District Conservationist and schedule an appointment to begin the conservation planning process. For woodland owners, this means developing a forest management plan (which is a required element for EQIP financial assistance).

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15 STEP 2: Obtain a Farm and Tract number with the Farm Service Agency to become a USDA participant. STEP 3: Complete the necessary application forms including, but not limited to the: CPA-1200 – Application Form SF-1199 – Direct Deposit Form FSA-211 – Power of Attorney (if applicable) CCC-901 or 902 – Members Information Sheet (if legal entity) CCC-931 – Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) AD Highly Erodible Land (HEL) and Wetland Determination Form

16 1. Must be an individual or legal entity 2. Must have Signature Authority 3. Owner or actively engaged in the management of the agricultural or forestry operation being enrolled. Documented by either of the following: a. Records from FSA to identify owner or operator b. Production of $1,000 in Ag products produced, sold or both. Woodland owners are EXEMPT from this requirement.

17 4. Have control of the land 5. Be in compliance with HEL and wetland provisions 6. Meet AGI requirements: a. Non-farm income cannot exceed $1M (unless 66.66% of the total Non-farm and Farm is FARM income) b. Farm income cannot exceed $750, Be within the appropriate Farm Bill payment limitations ($300,000 over 6 year period of )

18 8. Meet Historically Underserved criteria if self- certifying as such to receive the 90% payment rate 9. Have an identified resource concern that may be addressed through the program you are applying for

19 Participants meeting one of the three categories of historically underserved are eligible for the 90% payment rate. Those are: 1. New/Beginning Farmer – must meet BOTH a. Not operated for more than 10 consecutive years b. Must provide the day-to-day operations (labor)

20 2. Socially Disadvantaged – includes all minority participants 3. Limited Resource Farmer – must meet BOTH a. Gross farm sales of not more than the current indexed value in EACH of the previous 2 years b. Total household income AT or BELOW the national poverty level for a family of four For more information on this designation please go to:

21 EQIP 2010 – $8 M (about $400,000 in Forestland) 2011 – $8.67 M (about $345,000 in Forestland) WHIP 2010 – $2.2 M ($1.1 M in the Longleaf Initiative) 2011 – $2.7 M ($1.5 M in the Longleaf Initiative) CSP 2010 – $1.1 M in Forestland 2011 – $230,000 in Forestland HFRP $950,000

22 Kellee Melton, Assistant State Conservationist for Programs Shaun Worley, Program Specialist for EQIP, WHIP, HFRP Glenn Sandifer, Program Specialist for CSP


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