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D1.HBS.CL5.11 Slide 1. Subject Elements This unit comprises three Elements: Promote gueridon service to guests Prepare gueridon equipment for service.

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Presentation on theme: "D1.HBS.CL5.11 Slide 1. Subject Elements This unit comprises three Elements: Promote gueridon service to guests Prepare gueridon equipment for service."— Presentation transcript:

1 D1.HBS.CL5.11 Slide 1

2 Subject Elements This unit comprises three Elements: Promote gueridon service to guests Prepare gueridon equipment for service Prepare and serve menu items Slide 2

3 Assessment Assessment for this unit may include: Oral questions Written questions Work projects Workplace observation of practical skills Practical exercises Formal report from supervisor Slide 3

4 Element 1: Promote gueridon service to guests Slide 4

5 Promote gueridon service to guests Performance Criteria for this Element are: Identify the range of menu items that may be offered via gueridon service Describe and promote a range of gueridon menu items to guests and potential guests Describe the procedures involved in the provision of gueridon service to guests Slide 5

6 Promote gueridon service to guests Performance Criteria for this Element are: Identify, describe and explain the role of ingredients used in gueridon service of menu items Select and use appropriate materials on gueridon trolley to assist in the promotion of gueridon service Slide 6

7 Gueridon service In summary gueridon service is the preparation, cooking or partial cooking of menu items in view of the customer This is commonly prepared on a moveable trolley which can be positioned in front of each respective table Slide 7

8 Gueridon service Gueridon service is a traditional style of service that is commonly reserved for high end establishments. It is a style of service that is: Very visual Popular with customers Adds a dimension of entertainment Enhances the dining experience Slide 8

9 Gueridon service Complexity of gueridon service It is often described as the most complex of service styles, as every action is performed: In front of the guest Away from main equipment With limited preparation space In a busy environment By staff who are usually not professional cooks Slide 9

10 Gueridon service Reducing complexity of gueridon service A large number of food and beverage establishments will either provide: A reduced version of this style Operate open kitchen concepts Finish off items using gueridon service Slide 10

11 Advantages of gueridon service Provides a unique point of difference Promotes menu items to surrounding tables and therefore increased sales Involves the customer Provides higher level of entertainment Slide 11

12 Advantages of gueridon service Increases personalised service Increases interaction with the customer Allows customers to experience the cooking process Enables an establishment to charge premium prices Showcases skills of staff Slide 12

13 Disadvantages of gueridon service Need for specialist equipment Staff need to be highly skilled Highly labour intensive Increased safety risk as cooking is conducted in the dining environment, close to the customer Reduces space that can be used for more tables and chairs Slide 13

14 Menu items What menu items are commonly provided through gueridon service including: Food items Beverage items What needs to be considered when selecting items to be prepared using this method? Slide 14

15 Menu items Selection of menu items The selection of these menu items will be based on: Ingredients involved Complexity of the dish Expertise of the staff preparing the dish Time taken to prepare the dish Level of preparation and/or cooking performed in front of the guest Slide 15

16 Gueridon food menu items Appetisers Appetisers are menu items offered for guests to eat prior to their main course. What appetisers are commonly served? Slide 16

17 Gueridon food menu items Appetisers Hors doeuvres Canapés Savouries Antipasto Tapas Finger foods Sandwiches Slide 17

18 Gueridon food menu items Soups A traditional course on many menus, soups provide low food cost items for many premises. What soups are commonly served? Slide 18

19 Gueridon food menu items Soups Clear soups Broths Purées Cream soups Bisque Slide 19

20 Gueridon food menu items Pasta Pasta is a common item that is prepared using gueridon service Normally the pasta itself is par cooked (partially cooked) in kitchens and then finished off with other ingredients and sauces in front of the customer Slide 20

21 Gueridon food menu items Salads Salads may exist as a stand-alone menu item or as an accompaniment to a main course dish They often come with a dressing What types of salads and dressings are commonly served? Slide 21

22 Gueridon food menu items Salads Salads can be served in simple form such as a green salad or may be more intensive including a variety of: Hot or cold meat Raw or cooked vegetables Nuts and seeds Cheeses Hot or cold dressings Slide 22

23 Gueridon food menu items Salads Caesar salad Caesar salad is the most popular salad made in front of the guests. What is in this salad? What is the history of this salad? Why is it globally popular? Slide 23

24 Gueridon food menu items Meat, poultry, fish and seafood Staple ingredients can be: The stand-alone ingredient for a dish Ingredients in other menu items What types of meat, poultry, fish and seafood are commonly served using gueridon service? Slide 24

25 Gueridon food menu items Meat Beef Lamb Veal Goat Pork Slide 25

26 Gueridon food menu items Poultry Chicken Turkey Squab Pheasant Duck Goose Slide 26

27 Gueridon food menu items Fish Flat fish Round fish Fillets Whitefish Oily fish Slide 27

28 Gueridon food menu items Seafood Shellfish Molluscs Crustaceans Octopus and squid Slide 28

29 Gueridon food menu items Vegetables What types of vegetables are commonly served? How are they prepared and served? Slide 29

30 Gueridon food menu items Sauces, accompaniments and garnishes Sauces, garnishes and accompaniments are additions to the main ingredients of a meal They can be used to enhance the flavour, colour, aroma and overall presentation of the meal Slide 30

31 Gueridon food menu items Sauces Sauce is a term used in cookery to describe a wide range of flavoured liquids that are served as part of the meal, or dish The addition of a sauce to a dish can be used to transform the overall presentation of a dish by adding flavour, moisture, richness and visual appeal Slide 31

32 Gueridon food menu items Accompaniments Accompaniments are complementary additions to the main ingredient of a meal. Accompaniments are typically: Vegetables Fries Steamed or fried rice Side salads Sauces and relishes Salsa Slide 32

33 Gueridon food menu items Accompaniments - roasts Accompaniments for roasts include: Horseradish sauce Mustard Mint sauce Mint jelly Cranberry sauce Slide 33

34 Gueridon food menu items Garnishes Garnish refers to the decoration of food by the addition of other items Garnishes should be fresh, colourful, edible and should be suited to the meal Slide 34

35 Gueridon food menu items Garnishes Common garnishes may include: Lemon wedges Herbs including parsley, rosemary, dill, basil Carrot twirls Vegetable juliennes Croutons Slide 35

36 Gueridon food menu items Specialist cuisine food items Specialist cuisine food items commonly relate to cuisines of various cultures. What are different cuisines in different countries ? Slide 36

37 Gueridon food menu items Specialist cuisine food items Offal Aromatics, flavourings, spices, spice mixes and herbs Garnishes Seeds and nuts Grains, rice and pulses Fungi Preserves, condiments and accompaniments Slide 37

38 Gueridon food menu items Specialist cuisine food items Fruits, vegetables, flowers and salad items Aquatic plants such as seaweeds Specialist cheeses and dairy products Sweeteners such as palm sugar, honey and glucose Fats and oils Bush foods Slide 38

39 Gueridon food menu items Desserts Desserts are served after the main course What types of desserts are commonly served using gueridon service? Slide 39

40 Gueridon food menu items Desserts Puddings, cakes and flans Fritters Prepared fruit Soufflé Crepes and omelettes Ice cream, bombes and parfaits Slide 40

41 Gueridon food menu items Desserts – Crepes Suzette Crepes suzette is the most popular menu item prepared in gueridon service as it is not only quick to make but is very visual. It is often prepared in a sauté pan in full view of the guests. What ingredients are in this dessert? How is it made? Slide 41

42 Gueridon food menu items Fruit A growing focus on healthy eating has seen increased up- take of fruit in premises. What types of fruit items and dishes are commonly served using gueridon service? Slide 42

43 Gueridon food menu items Cheese There are endless varieties of cheese. Cheese is normally sliced or portioned and served with a variety of accompaniments including: Fruit Nuts Olives Crackers Bread Slide 43

44 Gueridon beverage menu items Types of beverages These include: Hot and cold beverages Alcoholic and non-alcoholic choices Coffees and teas Slide 44

45 Gueridon beverage menu items Speciality Coffees Various spirits and liqueurs can be combined with hot coffee and fresh double cream They make a dessert in its own right, to accompany a dessert or to conclude a meal Slide 45

46 Gueridon beverage menu items Spirits and liqueurs In some cases customers may wish to have a spirit or liqueur at the end of a meal or to accompany a dessert. These normally consist of: Cognac Armagnac Calvados Liqueurs Port Slide 46

47 Promote & discuss menu items Many customers will rely on you to provide them with information about menu items. It is the role of the server to ensure they actively: Promote menu items that are available through this service style Provide related information that may be helpful to them Slide 47

48 Provide information When all the guests are seated, and the menus have been distributed, your next task is to inform the customers of: Items that are available through gueridon service Other menu items that are prepared in the kitchen Slide 48

49 Provide information Information that may need to be provided include: Menu items prepared through gueridon service Method of preparation Cooking time Slide 49

50 Provide information Making recommendations When a customer asks What do you recommend? there are four options: Recommend what it is you like Recommend what is popular Recommend whatever it is that the kitchen have asked you to push Ask some questions first to determine their preferences Slide 50

51 Provide information Keys when making recommendations Ensuring information is honest and truthful Ensuring customers do not get the impression you are rushing your delivering of this information Ensuring guests dont feel they are imposing on you by asking these questions Giving customers time to make their decision Providing extra information as required Tailoring your information to suit the customer Slide 51

52 Promoting menu items Normally the presence of a gueridon trolley itself will raise interest amongst fellow diners. How else can you promote menu items provided through gueridon service? Slide 52

53 Promoting menu items Promotional methods Suggestive selling phrases Use of menus, wine lists, drink lists Physically supporting the point-of-sale displays The attractive use and presentation of trolleys Referring to point-of-sale advertising materials such as tent cards, recipe sheets, fliers and brochures Slide 53

54 Gueridon procedures What activities take place as part of gueridon service: During preparation phase In front of customers Slide 54

55 Gueridon procedures Follow recipes Each server will need to know: What ingredients are used in each gueridon menu item The expected and acceptable quality of each ingredient The amount or volume of each ingredient How it is to be prepared for gueridon service Slide 55

56 Gueridon procedures Portioning Portioning means controlling the size or quantity of menu items to be served to each customer. What influences portion sizes? Where is this information found? How are common portions for different foods? Why is it important to have strict portion controls? Slide 56

57 Gueridon procedures Trimming To prepare meat for various culinary uses, be it beef, veal, lamb or pork, it is most likely the meat will require some cleaning and trimming of excess fat cover, lymph nodes, connective tissues and blood vessels. Slide 57

58 Gueridon procedures Peeling This procedure normally relates to the preparation of vegetables and fruits They should be peeled or scraped thinly to remove only the skin, as most nutrients are just below the skin/surface Slide 58

59 Gueridon procedures Cutting Cutting is a common procedure used in gueridon service, often to: Portion menu ingredients To help aid cooking Enhance presentation Slide 59

60 Gueridon procedures Types of cuts Slice Chop Dice Shred Crush Slide 60

61 Gueridon procedures Mixing, whisking, combining These procedures are commonly associated with the preparation of dessert items. What is the difference between these? Slide 61

62 Gueridon procedures Sauteing Sautéing is where food is tossed in a small amount of hot fat over high heat to colour the food evenly during cooking Sauté comes from the French word sauter which means to jump Normally the ingredients are cut into small pieces or slices to help speed up the cooking process Slide 62

63 Gueridon procedures Flambéing The term flambé is a French word meaning "flaming" or "flamed" Flambé means to ignite foods that have liquor or liqueur added This is done for a dramatic effect and to develop a rich flavour of the liqueur to the foods without adding the alcohol Slide 63

64 Gueridon procedures Carving Depending on the menu item being carved, the term serves different purposes. When carving meat, smaller slices or portions are removed from the main piece of meat Carving of vegetables: Make smaller portions Help create visually aesthetic designs Slide 64

65 Gueridon procedures Filleting Filleting means to remove the edible flesh away from the inedible parts including scales, bones, organs etc Whilst the term is often associated with the preparation of fish, it applies to all meat products Slide 65

66 Gueridon procedures Assembling This is a common procedure in gueridon service and is the collecting and arranging of all necessary ingredients, whether cooked or raw, that constitutes a menu item This can refer to the preparation of a salad through to exotic curry dishes Slide 66

67 Gueridon procedures Serving This means to present the menu item to the customer Whilst gueridon service can often relate to different preparation and cooking procedures, the act of service is common in all situations Slide 67

68 Describing dishes and ingredients Whilst most people have an understanding of the different menu items and ingredients used in gueridon dishes, some customers will seek some kind of assistance. What kind of assistance do customers seek? Slide 68

69 Describing dishes and ingredients When explaining food items prepared in gueridon service, this primarily refers to: Menu items Ingredients Methods of preparation of cookery Culinary styles Slide 69

70 Describing dishes and ingredients Time to prepare or cook Portion sizes available Alternate or substitute items in dishes Prices Ingredients that customers commonly are allergic to Slide 70

71 Handling special needs Handling dietary needs Allergies Medications Health-related conditions Specific diets Healthy meals Gluten-free Vegetarian Vegan Slide 71

72 Handling special needs Cultural needs Jewish Muslim Hindu Slide 72

73 Explaining role of ingredients Customers are also quite interested to know the ingredients in dishes and how they compliment the dish including: Its taste and aroma The quantity to be included in the dish How it is to be prepared or cooked Its strength (important when discussing chilli) Possible substitutes How it complements a dish Slide 73

74 Gueridon items There are many different items that are used in gueridon service including: Trolleys Equipment Utensils Slide 74

75 Gueridon trolleys Types of gueridon trolleys may include: Flambé trolleys Hot carving trolleys Hors doeuvres trolleys Dessert trolleys Liqueur trolleys Slide 75

76 Equipment & Utensils Carving Carving knives Carving fork Steel Carving boards Spoons and meat forks Any service crockery, cutlery or vessels Ladles for serving sauces and accompaniments Service towel Towel for cleaning trolley Slide 76

77 Equipment & Utensils Sauteing Service set Copper or other appropriate pan Service towel Cooking utensils Serving cutlery, crockery and dishes Matches Slide 77

78 Equipment & Utensils Filleting Service set Fish spatula Service towel Knives - filleting knife and chefs knife Scissors - used to cut off fins and smaller bones Tweezers - used to remove small bones Slide 78

79 Equipment & Utensils Salads Service set including salad spoons and forks Knives or scissors Plastic or wooden salad bowls Service towel Pepper grinder Pans and cooking utensils Slide 79

80 Equipment & Utensils Cheeses Display plates Covers to protect cheese Service set including carving knife and cheese server Wooden cutting board Service towels Cheese knives Service plates Slide 80

81 Equipment & Utensils Desserts Pans Cooking utensils Service set including forks and spoons Wooden cutting board to slice fruits Service towels Service plates Slide 81

82 Equipment & Utensils General equipment and utensils Besides the equipment and utensils identified above general equipment and utensils include, but are certainly not limited to: Silver service gear Crockery items Silverware Sauce boats Slide 82

83 Equipment & Utensils General equipment and utensils Serving spoons and ladles Serving plates, bowls and platters Glassware Linen and napkins Matches or lighting source Rubbish bin Slide 83

84 Equipment & Utensils Fire and safety equipment Required in gueridon service for a number of reasons as cooking is taking place: Close to customers and tables In high traffic areas In areas not designed primarily for cooking By staff who are not chefs In surroundings consisting of highly flammable materials Slide 84

85 Equipment & Utensils Fire and safety equipment Fire extinguishers or fire blankets Knowledge about location and operation of shut off switches – power, water, gas, steam, LPG Gloves, aprons, facemasks and protective goggles Appropriate small equipment, thermometers First aid kit Knowledge of emergency procedures Slide 85

86 Element 2: Prepare gueridon equipment for service Slide 86

87 Prepare gueridon equipment for service Performance Criteria for this Element are: Clean and maintain gueridon trolleys, equipment and utensils Prepare trolleys and service area for service with equipment, utensils and linen Select food and non-food items for service to match menu items Slide 87

88 Prepare gueridon equipment for service Performance Criteria for this Element are: Verify the quality and condition of food and non-food items prior to use Position gueridon trolleys for maximum impact on sales potential Slide 88

89 Clean and maintain gueridon trolleys, equipment and utensils When working with any equipment, including a gueridon trolley, it is an important first step that you ensure that equipment is: Clean before use Of the correct type and size Is safely assembled ready for use Slide 89

90 Clean and maintain gueridon trolleys, equipment and utensils Cleanliness It is essential all trolleys, equipment and utensils: Are hygienically clean Visually looks clean Slide 90

91 Clean and maintain gueridon trolleys, equipment and utensils Hygienic requirements Make sure items are clean before using them Clean surfaces on a regular basis Ensure all items are clean between preparing different gueridon dishes Clean items after use Store cleaned and sanitised items Observe appropriate personal hygiene practices Slide 91

92 Clean and maintain gueridon trolleys, equipment and utensils Cleanliness during service It is important that anytime a gueridon trolley is wheeled in front of a table that it: Looks clean Has no evidence of prior cooking Gives the appearance that it has not been used before Slide 92

93 Clean and maintain gueridon trolleys, equipment and utensils Cleanliness during service Therefore it is essential that: Used items are either returned to the kitchen or stored in a closed space on the trolley All food scraps have been removed on a regular basis All surfaces, including tops and sides are clean The immediate area including the floor is free from any dirt, grime or debris Slide 93

94 Prepare for service Mise en place Selecting and assembling the equipment and utensils needed for gueridon service is part of the process known as mise en place This is a French term meaning to put in place Slide 94

95 Prepare for service Mise en place It means getting everything ready before you start cooking or preparing items in front of customers so that you dont have to interrupt the preparation process while you look for something Slide 95

96 Mise en place Preparing the gueridon trolley Pots and pans Cooking oils and utensils Sufficient fuel sources Cleaning items Cloths and rags Slide 96

97 Mise en place Preparing the gueridon trolley Crockery and cutlery Service plates, platters and utensils Condiments and proprietary sauces Alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages Basic maintenance to trolleys and burners Slide 97

98 Mise en place Preparing kitchen areas Clean pots and pans Clean chopping boards and knives Pre-prepared ingredients, in various states of readiness Ingredients are assembled and are complete for each food item Sufficient stock to adequately perform the shift Slide 98

99 Select food and non-food items for service Now that all necessary equipment and utensils have been prepared for gueridon service, the next logical step is the selection and preparation of items that will be needed to prepare menu items. What food items are required? What non-food items are required? Slide 99

100 Factors impacting menu items and ingredients Overall expected trade Current bookings Cyclical or historical information Days of the week Local events inside the hotel Surrounding events and festivals Weather Expected walk in trade Slide 100

101 Factors impacting menu items and ingredients Expected volume of each menu item Promotions Favoured or popular dishes Slide 101

102 Identify ingredients according to recipes Recipe A recipe is a formula which lists all the ingredients required and the method necessary to prepare a dish. Slide 102

103 Identify ingredients according to recipes A recipe should include the following: Name of the dish Instructions for preliminary preparations Equipment required Quantity and name of ingredients Method of preparation Cooking temperature Cooking time Number of portions Slide 103

104 Identify ingredients according to recipes Benefits of recipes The main reasons for using standard recipes are to: Maintain a consistent quality Record the food cost for each menu item Control the portion size Establish the food cost percentage for each menu item Write accurate food orders Assist in the training of new staff Slide 104

105 Assemble ingredients Assemble ingredients according to the correct type and quantity Ordering the correct ingredients Carrying sufficient stock on-hand to meet demands Selecting the correct recipe Correctly interpreting the ingredients so correct/appropriate ones are used Correctly weighing and measuring ingredients Choosing and preparing the correct equipment Slide 105

106 Verify the quality and condition of food The quality of the items selected must match the standards of the establishment. How can you undertake quality controls? What are you looking for? Slide 106

107 Conducting preparation activities Even if all cooking or carving is to be performed in front of the customer, there is often a great deal of preparation that needs to take place to ensure that time is efficiently used when it is show time! What activities need to take place? Where are these activities performed? Slide 107

108 Conducting preparation activities Common preparation activities Wash and clean food items Cut food items Peel and trim fruit and vegetables Turn vegetables Julienne items Prepare garnishes Prepare accompaniments Slide 108

109 Conducting preparation activities Common preparation activities Collect oils and other cooking agents Prepare diary items including milk, creams and butters Cut cheese pieces or wedges Measure, sift and measure farinaceous products Prepare nuts and seeds Marinate meats Slide 109

110 Conducting preparation activities Common preparation activities Prepare batters and coatings Prepare bread crumbs Prepare salad dressings Prepare sandwiches Cut / portion desserts Slide 110

111 Conducting preparation activities Common preparation activities Make of sauces Par- cooking items Heating or cooling items Wrapping and preparing individual portions Slide 111

112 Position gueridon trolleys for maximum impact Once all preparation activities have been conducted, it is now time to position the trolleys for maximum impact. Considerations: Type of trolley Practical considerations Visual impact Safety considerations Slide 112

113 Position gueridon trolleys for maximum impact Type of trolley Display trolleys Preparation / cooking trolleys Whilst idle Whilst in use Timing of trolley Slide 113

114 Position gueridon trolleys for maximum impact Positioning trolleys for practicality and safety Primary considerations: Flames Spitting of hot oil Heat Slide 114

115 Position gueridon trolleys for maximum impact Positioning trolleys for practicality and safety Secondary considerations: Near required electrical sockets In a low traffic area Away from flammable items Near suitable ventilation or exhaust capabilities Unlikely to be bumped by other staff or customers Close to the largest amount of tables with minimum movement Slide 115

116 Position gueridon trolleys for maximum impact Direct safety precautions There are many other safety requirements that must be addressed including: Need for staff training Removing pan from flame before adding spirits Regulating height of flame Ensuring that flammable liquors are sealed and kept away from flame Slide 116

117 Element 3: Prepare and serve menu items Slide 117

118 Prepare and serve menu items Performance Criteria for this Element are: Prepare and serve a range of food menu items using the gueridon Prepare and serve a range of beverage menu items using the gueridon Prepare accompaniments to accompany a range of menu items using the gueridon Slide 118

119 Prepare and serve menu items Performance Criteria for this Element are: Involve and entertain guests as part of the gueridon service experience Present finished menu items for service in a professional and attractive manner Clear and clean trolleys and other gueridon equipment and utensils on completion of the provision of gueridon service Slide 119

120 Prepare and serve menu items Now that the gueridon trolley is, stocked and in place, it is now time to prepare and serve a range of menu items This is the time that customers get to participate in the gueridon experience, many for the first time This section will explore in detail the different procedures undertaken in the gueridon process and ways to interact and involve the customers to enhance their dining experience Slide 120

121 Carving meat Roasts are a great dish which is very popular in many restaurants Roasting, and spit roasting, is the principle of cookery in which food is cooked in an oven or while rotating on a spit Slide 121

122 Carving meat Carving meat procedures Presenting platter of meat to the guest for approval Turning on heat source to keep protein warm while carving Carve meat Minimising waste Placing meat on plate Placing starch, vegetable and appropriate garnish on plate Slide 122

123 Carving meat Carving techniques A stand time of 10 to 20 minutes Place the meat on a large cutting board with a well at one end to hold the juice Use a long, sharp carving knife to slice the meat and a long-handled meat fork to steady the meat Slicing protein into equal portions Cutting cleanly and neatly at designated area Ensure that movements are swift and accurate Slide 123

124 Sautéing food Sautéing is where food is tossed in a small amount of hot fat over high heat to colour the food evenly during cooking Sauté comes from the French word sauter which means to jump Normally the ingredients are cut into small pieces or slices to help speed up the cooking process Slide 124

125 Sautéing food Suitable foods for sautéing Tender food items Tougher cuts of minced or finely chopped meat Cuts of meat that are too lean for grilling Fish, either whole or as fillets Lobster, squid (calamari) and prawns Most vegetables Omelettes and eggs Pancakes Pre-cooked pasta and rice Slide 125

126 Sautéing food Sautéing techniques Place minimal amount of fat in the pan Wait until fat is hot Add protein to the pan Season the food Seal in hot fat to retain natural juices While the food is cooking, toss it regularly so that it cooks regularly Cook protein until it is caramelising, the protein will release when ready Slide 126

127 Sautéing food Sautéing techniques Turn protein over to cook the other side Remove pan from the heat source Add spirits or liqueurs and flambé Place pan back on to the heat source Add sauce to the pan Deglaze the pan juices Slide 127

128 Sautéing food Sautéing techniques Strain the sauce Adjust the seasoning and serve Place sautéed item onto the plate Place starch, vegetable and appropriate garnish on plate Serve the guest their tableside items Slide 128

129 Filleting fish Filleting techniques – round fish Grasp the gutted fish firmly at the head Cut through the skin and flesh at the head, just behind the front fin and close to the gills, until you reach the spine Lay the fish flat on the board and cut along the dorsal, or top, fin down to the rib cage from head to tail Slide 129

130 Filleting fish Filleting techniques – round fish Ease the knife gently towards the tail between spine and flesh, holding it firmly against the bone Turn the fish over and repeat on the other side If you are filleting a large fish, cut along the curve of the rib bones, rather than cutting through them Slide 130

131 Filleting fish Filleting techniques – flat fish Lay the skinned flat on the board Make an incision down the centre of the backbone from head to tail With the blade of the knife flat on the bone, cut gently out from the backbone towards the fins Remove the fish from the bone, using your free hand to ease back the flesh as you go Slide 131

132 Filleting fish Filleting techniques – flat fish Repeat for the other half of that side Next turn the fish over and do the same on the other side There should be a minimum amount of flesh left on the bone Slide 132

133 Filleting fish Serving fish Once the fish has been filleted the last steps involve: Placing fillet of fish onto the plate Placing starch, vegetable and appropriate garnish on plate Serving the guest their tableside items Slide 133

134 Preparing salads Usually salads consist of cold preparations made from raw, cooked or blanched vegetables, served singly or in combination Warm salads are a more modern addition to the menu Slide 134

135 Preparing salads Salad ingredients Lettuce, tomato and greens Fresh herbs Fruits Nuts Pasta Slide 135

136 Preparing salads Salad ingredients Seafood Meats Cheeses Cooked eggs Wide range of sauces and garnishes Slide 136

137 Preparing salads Basic features of a good salad All ingredients must be fresh and of good quality The salad must be attractive and appetising in appearance All ingredients should be chosen and mixed so that flavours are compatible It should be simple, without elaborate garnishes The ingredients for a salad should be chosen to contrast with other food being served Slide 137

138 Preparing salads Salad preparation techniques All raw ingredients should be fresh and of impeccable quality All leaf salad vegetables should be carefully trimmed of discoloured or damaged leaves and roots, them washed in cold water, drained and dried thoroughly Remove any tough or wilted spots Large salad leaves are best if carefully torn into manageable sized pieces Vegetables, whether raw or cooked, should be cut as evenly and neatly as possible Slide 138

139 Preparing salads Salad preparation techniques Season the bowl according to recipe Place ingredients in the bowl according to recipe Salads comprising raw, green salad leaves should be dressed and mixed at the last possible minute. See below for more information relating to dressings Portioning ingredients onto appropriate crockery Serving the guest their tableside items Slide 139

140 Serving cheese Serving cheese techniques Remove most cheeses from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before serving For whole wheels and large wedges, cut only what you expect to use and return the remainder to the refrigerator Cut cheese according to menu including wedges, slices or rounds To cut a wedge of cheese from a wheel, use a large knife dipped in hot water and wiped Slide 140

141 Serving cheese Serving cheese techniques To cut a wedge of cheese from a wheel, use a large knife dipped in hot water and wiped Slice the cheese rind or wax first and then gently rock the knife from front-to-back, applying pressure to evenly cut through the body of the cheese Make swift and accurate movements Remove rind or wax covering if required Portioning cheese Slide 141

142 Serving cheese Serving cheese techniques Ensuring that edges of cheese sections are smooth Minimising waste For serving, whilst cheese knives are suitable to serve hard cheeses. A butter knife can be used for softer cheeses. Marinated cheeses in oil can be served with a small fork or spoon. Placing cheese on appropriate crockery Slide 142

143 Serving cheese Serving cheese techniques Add suitable accompaniments Serving the guest their tableside items Remember to provide a separate cheese knife or utensil for each cheese Encourage guests not to mix the knives to avoid mixing cheese flavours Slide 143

144 Serving desserts Serving dessert techniques Slicing of cakes and flans Serving of muffins and individual pies Scooping of ice-cream Lighting of bombes Cooking of crepes and omelettes Slide 144

145 Serving desserts Flambé steps Preparing items for inclusion Turning on heat source to heat copper pan Placing butter and sugar in the pan Caramelising butter and sugar Adding ingredients Removing pan from the heat source Slide 145

146 Serving desserts Flambé steps Adding spirits or liqueur to the pan according to recipe Flambéing according to recipe Placing pan back on the heat source Placing tableside dessert item onto the plate Adding suitable sauce, accompaniments and garnish and serve Slide 146

147 Preparing beverage items Range of beverage items Given that most customers will have some type of beverage to accompany a meal, there are many beverages that can be promoted and served through gueridon service to help improve the dining experience. What beverage items can be prepared using gueridon service? How are they prepared? Slide 147

148 Preparing cocktails Types of cocktails There are five different methods to making a cocktail: Shaken Blended Built Stirred Layered Slide 148

149 Preparing cocktails Shaken The ingredients are placed into a cocktail shaker, shaken and then strained into a glass. Between the Sheets Brandy Alexander Daiquiri Golden Dream Slide 149

150 Preparing cocktails Blended Ingredients are placed into a blender and blended. Pina Colada Frozen Daiquiri Margarita Slide 150

151 Preparing cocktails Built These are simply mixed in the glass in which they will be served. They include floating liqueur on top of the built drink. Harvey Wallbanger Singapore Sling Rusty Nail Tequila Sunrise Slide 151

152 Preparing cocktails Stirred The ingredients are placed into a mixing glass (called a bar glass) and stirred together with ice and then strained into the glass in which they are served. Martini Gibson Cosmopolitan Slide 152

153 Preparing cocktails Layered These are built in the glass they are served in (a liqueur) glass. The intention is that the drinker sips one layer at a time, enjoying the different tastes that the cocktail presents. B52 Oil Slick Traffic Lights Slide 153

154 Preparing fortified wines Fortified wines are base wines which are strengthened or fortified by the addition of grape spirit or brandy The standard industry size serve for a fortified wine is 60 mls Slide 154

155 Preparing fortified wines Types of fortified wines Sherries Vermouth Ports Muscat Tokay Frontignac Slide 155

156 Preparing specialist coffee Liqueur/spirit coffees Another popular after-dinner drink is the range of liqueur/spirit coffees The main difference between liqueur coffees and spirit coffees, is that liqueur coffees dont have added sugar but spirit coffees have sugar added Slide 156

157 Preparing specialist coffee Techniques to make specialist coffee Ready the glass or mug Prepare good-quality, strong, black coffee Put 30 ml of the required spirit or liqueur into the glass/mug Add sugar if required Pour in coffee Stir to disperse liquor and/or melt sugar Float fresh cream on top Serve immediately Slide 157

158 Prepare accompaniments There are endless accompaniments that can be served with food and beverage items Most menu items will have traditional accompaniments that compliment or contrast tastes, textures and colours Slide 158

159 Roast accompaniments Accompaniments for roasted meat Roast lamb Mint sauce and gravy Roast mutton Onion sauce and gravy Roast pork Sage and onion stuffing, apple sauce and gravy Roast veal Thyme, lemon and parsley stuffing and gravy Roast beef Yorkshire pudding, horseradish sauce and gravy Slide 159

160 Roast accompaniments Accompaniments for roasted meat Roast chicken Thyme, lemon and parsley stuffing and gravy Roast duck Sage and onion stuffing, apple sauce and gravy Roast turkey Chestnut or parsley stuffing, bread sauce, gravy, cranberry sauce/jelly Roast game Cranberry sauce Slide 160

161 Roast accompaniments Accompaniments for roasted meat Roasted meats are normally served with: Roasted vegetables including potato, pumpkin and carrots Steamed vegetables including cauliflower and broccoli Slide 161

162 Seafood accompaniments Accompaniments for seafood Lemon wedges or slices Tartare sauce Chilli Sauce Tabasco sauce Mayonnaise Dill Parsley Salsa Slide 162

163 Seafood accompaniments Accompaniments for seafood Seafood is normally served with: Rice Potatoes – normally French fries Salad Slide 163

164 Salad accompaniments Salad dressings Some form of dressing is commonly served with salad. Salads are usually served with a dressing to combine the ingredients, to add flavour and to lubricate. The two main dressings are: Vinaigrette (French dressing) Mayonnaise Slide 164

165 Salad accompaniments Making vinaigrette Vinaigrette is a mixture of oil, vinegar, salt and pepper As a general rule of thumb, the recommended ratio of oil to vinegar is 2 parts oil to 1 part vinegar Slide 165

166 Salad accompaniments Accompaniments for salads Salad is normally served with: Bread – sticks, croutons, toasted An accompaniment to a meat Slide 166

167 Dessert accompaniments Accompaniments for desserts Sauces – hot or cold Coulis – pureed fruit Fruit Ice cream Yoghurt Cream – fresh, whipped, clotted Custard Slide 167

168 Cheese accompaniments Accompaniments for cheese Nuts Dried fruit Fresh fruit Olives Pate Dips Cured meats Slide 168

169 Cheese accompaniments Accompaniments for cheese Pickled vegetables Crudités (vegetable sticks) Crackers Bread Rolls Toast Bread sticks Wines, tokays, muscats and ports Slide 169

170 Involve and entertain guests A major reason for introducing gueridon service in an establishment is to enhance the customer dining experience The best way to do this is include and interact with the customer Slide 170

171 Involve and entertain guests Explain the process Preparation process Cooking process Choice of ingredients Where ingredients can be sourced Culinary terms customers may not be aware of Cooking styles used Service options available Slide 171

172 Involve and entertain guests Other techniques to involve and entertain Telling the history of gueridon service Telling of the history of the dish being prepared Advising guests of the alternatives available within the recipe for the dish being prepared Seeking guest preferences and making suggestions for dish variations Allowing guests to sample products Provision of showmanship Slide 172

173 Present finished menu items The actual food and beverages that the guests consume is only part of the total dining experience The service of those items is another vital part of the experience It is not just about handing over a plate of food or a beverage but to ensure the customer has everything they require to enjoy the meal, be it cutlery, condiments or additional sauces Slide 173

174 Present finished menu items Key points when serving food and beverage Do it quickly Do it professionally Ensure the hygienic presentation of completed items Ensure consistency in neatness, balance and serve sizes Ensure the use of correct service wear, cutlery and glassware Slide 174

175 Present finished menu items Serving food Place meat at the 6 oclock position Announce each meal and cooking style Allow access by all when preparing shared platters Ensure adequate service cutlery Ensure sufficient sauce containers or accompaniments Slide 175

176 Present finished menu items Serving beverages Place the beverage to the right of the seated customer Should handle glassware by the base or the stem All drinks should be announced Ensure adequate straws and garnishes Use coasters or napkins under drinks Slide 176

177 Present finished menu items Ensuring adequate side dishes / condiments Tomato sauce Tabasco sauce Mustards Tartare sauce More butter More bread or rolls Side salad Bowl of chips Onion rings Slide 177

178 Present finished menu items Ensuring adequate eating utensils Extra cutlery Extra crockery Extra glassware More serviettes A finger bowl A scrap bowl Slide 178

179 Present finished menu items Complete additional activities Offering additional food and beverage Checking customer satisfaction Thank and leave Slide 179

180 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Now that all food and beverage items prepared through gueridon service has been completed it is now time to remove the trolley from the customer table and to prepare it for upcoming service. What activities need to take place at the end of a gueridon activity or session? Slide 180

181 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Remove trolley The first step is to remove the trolley to an appropriate location, preferably in the kitchen. Takes the used trolley out of view of customer Frees up space in the dining environment Allows ease of clearing, cleaning and replenishing Slide 181

182 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Clear trolley and items The next step is to clear all used items off the gueridon trolley. This may include used: Pots and pans Utensils Plates Food containers Glassware Napkins Service ware Slide 182

183 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Store unused perishables In many cases there are unused items that can be reused, include Sugar, salt and pepper packets Napkins Sealed condiments Decorations Garnishes Unused cutlery, crockery and other service items Slide 183

184 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Dispose of left over food At the end of each gueridon session and at the end of trade you may be required to dispose leftover food and other items used during service. Naturally this is essential: Visually Hygienically Slide 184

185 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Reusing items Items that can be re-used include: Butters and dairy products Cooking oils and proprietary sauces Salt and pepper Slide 185

186 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Clean trolley Pieces of gueridon equipment and items may need to be: Cleaned and left out ready for the next shift Cleaned and stored away ready for use some time in the future Turning off specified electrical items Slide 186

187 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Replenish trolley Once the trolley is clean it is now time to replenish the trolley with all items that will be required for the next service cycle There are many items that need to be replenished on a gueridon trolley. Slide 187

188 Clear and clean trolleys, equipment and utensils Store trolley The last step is to store the gueridon trolley in the appropriate location, including: Ensuring staff and equipment safety Ensuring all items are cleaned Ensuring that food-related items are protected from contamination Ensure any gas supply is turned off or removed Making sure items are returned to their nominated locations Checking individual items Slide 188

189 Revision and Assessments It is now time to complete any: Revision Activities Assessments Slide 189

190 Finish: Thank you! Slide 190


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