Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Service-Learning Foundations and Practices Annie Mae Young, Quilts of Gees Bend, ca. 1975 Jen Gilbride-Brown, Ph.D The Ohio State University.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Service-Learning Foundations and Practices Annie Mae Young, Quilts of Gees Bend, ca. 1975 Jen Gilbride-Brown, Ph.D The Ohio State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Service-Learning Foundations and Practices Annie Mae Young, Quilts of Gees Bend, ca Jen Gilbride-Brown, Ph.D The Ohio State University

2 What is service-learning? Service-learning is a form of experiential education characterized by all of the following: student participation in an organized service activity participation in service activities connected to specific learning outcomes participation in service activities that meet identified community needs structured time for student reflection and connection of the service experience to learning (Abes, Jackson & Jones, 2002)

3 Where is service-learning? RecipientProvider Beneficiary ServiceLearning Focus Service-Learning Community Service VolunteerismInternship Field Education Furco, A Service-Learning: A balanced approach to experimental education. In B. Taylor, (Ed.) Expanding Boundaries: Service and Learning. Corporation for National and Community Service.

4 Key Themes in Service-Learning Collaboration with the community (reciprocity) Importance of reflection Active learning (meaningful work) Development of a sense of caring Promotion of a sense of civic responsibility Ameliorate societal problems (OGrady, 2000)

5 Models good practice with emphasis on collaboration, reciprocity, commitment Promotes reflective thinking Increases self-knowledge, cognitive complexity, knowledge of diverse others and communities Deepens commitments to the common good which seek a more just, equitable world Strengths of Service-Learning

6 Transformative potential Ability to connect subject matter with real- life experience: experiential learning Personal development, critical thinking, sensitivity to diversity, and development of citizenship (Eyler and Giles, 1999; Jones, 2002) Outcomes of Service-Learning

7 Information about outcomes research Eyler and Giles (1999) process spanned six years. Two major studies: -Survey of 1500 college students from 20 institutions with interviews of 66 students from 7 institutions -Interviews with 67 students active in service- learning from 6 institutions. All results statistically significant of.05 level or higher

8 Design matters! High quality placements matching students interests and developmental readiness Application/Connection between course subject matter and issues raised by service experience Structured reflection in the form of writing and discussion Diverse life experiences, view points, and ways of knowing are integral to design Presence and validation of the wisdom of community voice

9 Program Characteristics as Predictors of Service-Learning Outcomes Source: Eyler, J. & Giles, D. (1999). Wheres the learning in service-learning. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Based on data from the FIPSE sponsored survey and interview studies reported in this book. Outcomes

10 Major learning outcomes Stereotyping and Tolerance outcomes More positive view of people with whom they work Growing appreciation for difference: seeing similarities through differences Increased capacity for tolerance Related Program Characteristics: Placement quality, reflection activity, application of service and subject matter, diversity

11 Major learning outcomes Personal Development outcomes Greater self-knowledge, spiritual growth, reward in helping others Increased personal efficacy, increased relationship between service-learning and career skill development Related Program Characteristics: Placement quality, reflection activity, application of service and subject matter, diversity

12 Major learning outcomes Interpersonal Development outcomes Increased ability to work well with others Increased leadership skills Related Program Characteristics: Placement quality where students are challenged and have appropriate opportunity to take responsibility over work

13 Major learning outcomes Community and College Connection outcomes Increased connectedness to community Development of connectedness with peers Increased closeness of faculty-student relationships Related Program Characteristics: Strong community voice, placement quality, reflection, and application

14 Design matters! High quality placements matching students interests and developmental readiness Application/Connection between course subject matter and issues raised by service experience Structured reflection in the form of writing and discussion Diverse life experiences, view points, and ways of knowing are integral to design Presence and validation of the wisdom of community voice

15 Program Characteristics as Predictors of Service-Learning Outcomes Source: Eyler, J. & Giles, D. (1999). Wheres the learning in service-learning. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Based on data from the FIPSE sponsored survey and interview studies reported in this book.

16 Developing Service-Learning Courses* o Develop statement of goals, expectations, and responsibilities. o Collaborate with community partner to determine the service activities students will perform. o Develop plan for how students will connect course content and service. * The Service-Learning Initiative at The Ohio State University

17 Developing Service-Learning Courses* o Consider how you will prepare students for service (course goals, objectives, activities, pre-service training, assessment, etc.). o Develop evaluation strategies to assess student learning and community impact. o Collaborate with community partner to make plan for sustaining partnership. * The Service-Learning Initiative at The Ohio State University

18 Types of courses and activities in service-learning Course TypeDescription Discipline- Based Students have presence in community throughout term and participate in ongoing reflection to connect course objectives to service Project-BasedStudents use knowledge gained from course to work on a community problem or need. Project not likely to be repeated in future. Service TypeDescription DirectWork with others, person-to-person and face-to- face IndirectWork on project impacting community as a whole, rather than individually.

19 Service-Learning Syllabi Construction* o Course Heading : Includes all course and faculty info o Course Description : Include non-traditional nature of course as well as connection between service and course content. o Introduction : Overview, purpose, rationale. Goes more in-depth with service description o Course goals and objectives : Goals are broad statements of learning outcomes. Objectives are measurable actions to realize goal.

20 Service-Learning Syllabi Construction* o Course Content : Readings and texts AS WELL AS service placement goals. Consider service as text. o Overview of course assignments : Consider range of assignments that also integrate reflective learning o Overview of grading policy : Has student demonstrated outcomes that flow from service? Not to be graded for doing service in and of itself. o Supplemental reading list : Promotes further exploration of issues explored through service

21 For your future use…

22 A word about reflection in syllabi…. Syllabus should list requirement for reflection component. Expectations about reflection should be woven throughout. Questions to prompt reflection and included in syllabus can enhance clarity about reflection expectations and prompt more critical reading practice. Structure for reflection and evaluation strategies for reflection are helpful to include.

23

24 Developmental Perspective on Learning o Prior knowledge is the key to learning o Prior knowledge must be activated o Learners must be actively involved in constructing personal meaning o Deep understanding takes time o Context reinforces learning

25 Kolbs Experiential Learning Styles Concrete Experience Feeling/Sensing Active Experimentation Doing/Planning Reflective Observation Watching/Reviewing Abstract Conceptualization Thinking/Concluding Process Continuum Perception Continuum

26 Kolbs Experiential Learning Styles Concrete Experience Feeling/Sensing Active Experimentation Doing/Planning Reflective Observation Watching/Reviewing Abstract Conceptualization Thinking/Concluding Process Continuum Perception Continuum

27 Ponders experiences and observes o Seeks data and considers thoroughly o Postpones decision making until all information is in o Watches and listens before offering opinion *CCPH, Reflection

28 Theorist o Approaches problem using linear approach o Pulls together data into theories o Seeks perfection o Dislikes uninformed decision-making *CCPH, Reflection

29 Pragmatist o Displays practical problem-solving and decision-making skills o Sees problems as opportunities o Acts quickly and with confidence to implement o Dislikes open-ended discussions *CCPH, Reflection

30 Activist o Acts first, considers consequences later o Focuses on the NOW oIll try anything once o Takes problems by brainstorming o Thrives on challenges, bored by implementation *CCPH, Reflection

31 Effective reflection… o Facilitates learners goals and objectives o Activates prior knowledge o Reinforces new knowledge o Identifies problems o Reinforces critical questions o Provides support o Enhances trust and dialogue

32 Modes of Reflection

33

34 Weaving reflection throughout your plan

35 Creating your plan

36 Syllabi and project examples o o o o o o


Download ppt "Service-Learning Foundations and Practices Annie Mae Young, Quilts of Gees Bend, ca. 1975 Jen Gilbride-Brown, Ph.D The Ohio State University."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google