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Introduction to Service Learning Julie Hatcher Associate Director, Center for Service and Learning Dr. Steven Jones Coordinator, Office of Service Learning.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Service Learning Julie Hatcher Associate Director, Center for Service and Learning Dr. Steven Jones Coordinator, Office of Service Learning."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Service Learning Julie Hatcher Associate Director, Center for Service and Learning Dr. Steven Jones Coordinator, Office of Service Learning IUPUI

2 Engagement of Faculty Work In and With the Community

3 Definition Service learning is a course-based, credit-bearing educational experience in which students a) participate in an organized service activity that meets identified community needs, and b) reflect on the service activity in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of personal values and civic responsibility. define 2 (Bringle & Hatcher, 1995)

4 Key Elements of Service Learning Reciprocity –Partnerships –Dialogue to structure the service experience Reflection –Perplexity (Dewey, 1933) –Activities to structure learning from the service experience define 4

5 Why Service Learning Within Higher Education Active learning strategy Develops civic responsibility Enhances student development Involves faculty expertise Supports an expanding role of higher education Addresses community need

6 Why Service Learning at IUPUI Consistent with the Universitys Civic Engagement Mission Consistent with Chancellor Bantzs goal of doubling the numbers of students and faculty participating in service-learning courses Consistent with the goals of the IUPUI Solution Center Part of IUPUIs Civic Initiative

7 Service Learning Outcomes Academic Development –Persistence and retention –Achievement and aspirations Life Skills –Racial tolerance –Cultural understanding Civic Responsibility –Commitment to community –Aspirations to volunteer (Sax & Astin, 1997) (See

8 Civic Responsibility collective action toward the common good (Barber 1998; Boyle-Baise, 2002) active participation in the public life of a community in an informed, committed, and constructive manner, with a focus on the common good. (Gottlieb & Robinson, 2002)

9 Key Principles Academic credit is for learning, not service. Set learning goals for students. Establish criteria for the selection of community service placements. Be prepared for uncertainty and variation in student learning outcomes. Maximize the community responsibility for orientation of the course. Do not compromise academic rigor. (Howard, 1993) course 7

10 Types of Service Learning Classes Optional component Required component Group service project Disciplinary capstone project Community-based action research Service internship (Heffernan, 2001)

11 Effective Service Learning >15 hours of service Frequent client contact Weekly in-class reflection Written reflection Student discussions with instructor and site supervisor (Mabry, 1998)

12 Models of Service-Learning Courses Pure Service Learning Discipline-Based Service Learning Problem-Based Service Learning Capstone Courses Service Internships Undergraduate Community-Based Action Research

13 Reflection as Cognitive Activity Engages students in the intentional consideration of their experiences in light of particular learning objectives. Reflection is both retrospective and prospective. Learning begins in perplexity.

14 Guidelines for Reflection Clearly links service experience to learning objectives Is structured in terms of expectations, assessment criteria Occurs regularly throughout semester Provides feedback from instructor Includes opportunity to explore, clarify, and alter values (Bringle & Hatcher, 1999)

15 Examples of Reflection Activities Personal Journals Directed Writings Classroom Assessment Techniques Agency Presentations Ethical Case Studies Student Portfolios On-line Techniques Experiential Research Paper Minute Papers Stand and Declare reflection 10 (Hatcher & Bringle, 1997)

16 Reflection activities Specific, targeted prompts Dialogue vs. debate Asset map of organization Experiential research paper Directed readings Presentations in public forums Letter to the editor Ethical case studies

17 Selecting a Service Site Congruence of learning and service goals Willingness to collaborate Ability to clarify tasks Knowledge and skills of students Ability to host a number of students Resources to monitor students Transportation issues

18 Expectations Course expectations on syllabus Number of service hours Scheduling information Liability issues Line of communication Agency expectations Importance of volunteers Liability issues Ethical issues; Issues of confidentiality Line of communication orientation 4

19 Resources Workshops on service learning throughout the academic year Individual assistance from the Office of Service Learning Classroom support through the Service Learning Assistants scholarship program Minigrants from Indiana Campus Compact Updates on funding and scholarship opportunities

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