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When I Get Back If you didnt take your War of 1812 test on Wednesday, come afterschool on Thursday. Wednesday is the last day to turn in your War of 1812.

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Presentation on theme: "When I Get Back If you didnt take your War of 1812 test on Wednesday, come afterschool on Thursday. Wednesday is the last day to turn in your War of 1812."— Presentation transcript:

1 When I Get Back If you didnt take your War of 1812 test on Wednesday, come afterschool on Thursday. Wednesday is the last day to turn in your War of 1812 newspaper article, so turn it in the homework bin. Turn in your daily guided questions (Week 13) in the homework bin too.

2 14.1 Review and Reteach

3 CA Standards Explain the policy significance of famous speeches (e.g., Washingtons Farewell Address, Jeffersons Inaugural Address, and John Q. Adamss Fourth of July 1821 Address) Analyze the rise of capitalism and the economic problems and conflicts that accompanied it. (e.g., Jacksons opposition to the National Bank; early decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court that reinforced the sanctity of contracts and a capitalist economic system of law) Outline the physical obstacles to and the economic and political factors involved in building a network of roads, canals, and railroads (e.g., Henry Clays American System) Discuss the election of Andrew Jackson as president in 1828, the importance of Jacksonian democracy, and his actions as president (e.g., the spoils system, veto of the National Bank, policy of Indian removal, and opposition to the Supreme Court).

4 Essential Questions How was the power of the federal government strengthened during the Era of Good Feeling? How did U.S. foreign affairs reflect new national confidence? How did the people gain more power during the Age of Jackson? Why did Jackson use force to remove Indians from the Southeast? How did old issues take a new shape in the conflict over a national bank and tariffs?

5 Concept Map Create a concept map using Henry Clays American System as the center circle. -Look at your notes or textbook pages to create your concept map. Henry Clays American System ( )

6 Henry Clays American System Support the Bank of the US (National Bank) Increase Infrastructure Protective Tariffs

7 Henry Clays American System Support the National Bank (2 nd Bank of the United States). Protective Tariffs. Improve Infrastructure (transportation system).

8 National Bank Also known as the Bank of the United States. Lent money to business owners (wealthy). Stable currency, controlled money supply, state banks issued too much. A safe place to keep federal money. Placed confidence in other banks.

9 Tariffs Tax on imports. -Foreign goods cost more. -British were dumping goods (selling cheap products). -Buy American. -Help pay for improvements. -Southern states dont like to pay them.

10 Infrastructure Paid for by tariffs. System of transportation that helps with trade and the economy.

11 Concept Map Create a concept map using the Supreme Court cases dealing with the economy. -Look at your notes or textbook pages to create your concept map. Supreme Court Cases (1819) (1824)

12 Supreme Court Cases McCulloch v. Maryland (1819) Dartmouth v. Woodward (1819) Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)

13 Supreme Court Cases Copy down the Key Concepts on page 243 named, Key Supreme Courts Cases and Their Impact.

14 Concept Map Create a concept map using U.S. foreign policy as the center circle. -Look at your notes or textbook pages and 225 to create your concept map. U.S. Foreign Policy ( )

15 U.S. Foreign Policy Adams-Onis Treaty (1819) Adams 4 th of July Address Monroe Doctrine (1823) Latin American Independence ( )

16 Adams-Onis Treaty Spain can control Floridas Native Americans from raiding American settlements. Andrew Jackson sent to control them. Spain ceded Florida to the USA.

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18 Adams July 4, 1821 Speech Showcased USAs foreign policy. -No designs on territories of other nations (no colonization). -Doesnt want to be a world police.

19 Latin American Independence European powers are losing their Latin American colonies. By 1825, most of Latin America is free from Europe powers. France and Russia say they might help Spain regain colonies.

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21 Monroe Doctrine, 1823 U.S.A warns Europe not to interfere in Americas. -dangerous to our peace and safety. -USA wants to trade with L. Amer. -U.S. wont interfere in Europe.

22 Concept Map Create a concept map using Andrew Jacksons Presidency as the center circle. -Look at your notes or textbook pages to create your concept map. Andrew Jacksons Presidency ( )

23 Andrew Jacksons Presidency Increased Suffrage Spoils System Veto of the National Bank

24 Jacksonian Democracy

25 Increased Suffrage Increased suffrage-The right to vote. States ease voting qualification. More people from the Western and Southern states are voting and holding office.

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27 Spoils System Rewarding loyal supporters with gov. jobs. Limits federal jobs to four-years terms. -Furthered democracy by bringing in new ideas and people.

28 Veto of National Bank Jackson vetoes re-charter of Second Bank of the United States. -privileged institution that favors the wealthy. -Says it is unconstitutional. -Controlled money supply too much.

29 States Rights & Nullification Americans debate powers between the states and fed. gov. (10 th Amendment). -Tariffs -federal laws (Alien and Sedition Acts) States dont have to follow laws that are unconstitutional or they object to. -Expressed by VP John C. Calhoun. -(Respect) the rights of the states…[there would be no Union].

30 Nullification, South Carolina Rebels Threatens to secede (break off or leave the U.S.A) due to 1828, 1832 tariffs. Congress passes Force Bill. -Army and navy can be used against SC. Henry Clay proposes tariff that lowers duties over ten years.

31 Guided Question What was the conflict between state and federal powers and how did it lead to concept of nullification and secession? Answer: 10 th Amendment reserved powers for the states, limiting federal power. Nullification: Idea that states didnt have to follow laws they objected to or were unconstitutional. If their rights were challenged, states had the right to secede (break off) the U.S.A.

32 Study Guide pg. 94 Finish up Study Guide pg. 94. Use your notes or textbook pages to complete it.


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