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MENTOR TEACHER WEBINAR Maria Moscatelli, WSUTC Christine Sodorff, WSU Pullman

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Presentation on theme: "MENTOR TEACHER WEBINAR Maria Moscatelli, WSUTC Christine Sodorff, WSU Pullman"— Presentation transcript:

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2 MENTOR TEACHER WEBINAR Maria Moscatelli, WSUTC Christine Sodorff, WSU Pullman

3 AREAS OF FOCUS Student Teaching Overview edTPA Co-Teaching

4 STUDENT TEACHING OVERVIEW Mentoring Roles Calendar and attendance Lesson planning Required paperwork Suggested timelines and models

5 MENTORING

6 THE MENTOR TEACHER The history and meaning of mentoring. The roles of Mentor teacher. Limits of a Mentor Potential Hazards with Mentor/Mentee relationship Vital to successful Mentoring Foundations for Successful Mentoring

7 BRIEF HISTORY The term mentor is over 3,000 years old. Origins of positive mentoring date back to Greek mythology. Odysseus left his trusted friend Mentor in charge of his household and his sons education while he left to fight the Trojans. Mentors name has been attached to the process of education and care by an older, experienced person.

8 Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities, because in each of us there is a private hope and dream which, fulfilled, can be translated into benefit for everyone and greater strength for our nation. John F. Kennedy

9 WHAT IS MENTORING? It involves a Mentor, a mentee, and the mentoring process. A mentor is a wise and trusted guide and advisor. A mentee is a novice in the field, a partner, or protégé. The mentoring process is a process whereby someone with more experience and expertise provides support, counseling, and advice to a less experienced colleague.

10 We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give, Winston Churchill

11 ACTIVITY Identify one person, preferably someone who is not a relative, who was a mentor to you. Think about why that person was important to you. Recall the qualities of that person that made him/her so valued, and write down 2-3 of these qualities. Think about how you can provide the same support to your mentee.

12 PURPOSE OF MENTORING Role model the type of behavior the individual should emulate. Coach the individual in behaviors that are most productive. Introduce the mentee to those in your building and in the profession who might contribute to their growth, development, and advancement. Advocate for the mentee when opportunities become available.

13 POTENTIAL HAZARDS WITH THE MENTOR/MENTEE RELATIONSHIP Setting unrealistic expectations. Misusing power and control. Competiveness. Dependence. Cloning.

14 VITAL TO SUCCESSFUL MENTORING Building trust Inspiring Giving corrective feedback Empathy

15 SUCCESSFUL MENTORING TIPS Develop and communicate clear goals and expectations at the beginning. What---Why---How? Share personal experiences and knowledge with the mentee. Provide supportive advice and assistance in a manner which allows the mentee to retain responsibility for achievement of their own goals. Workout when and how feedback will happen. Set ground rules and develop an agreement.

16 THE ROLES Mentor Teacher University Supervisor Building Principal

17 MENTOR TEACHER Welcome the teacher candidate and introduce to building colleagues as an addition to the teaching staff. Note: how you introduce the teacher candidate can make a big difference in the experience. Keep lines of communication open with the teacher candidate and the WSU supervisor. Collaborate with the teacher candidate in daily and long-range lesson planning and assessing teaching performance and student learning.

18 PREPARING FOR THE TEACHER CANDIDATE Desk space A place for their things Share school/district policies and procedures ( access, badge, keys) Tips and suggestions to ensure a smooth experience

19 EXCHANGE OF ROLES During the experience, the teacher candidate should take the lead in planning and teaching for an agreed upon duration of instruction. Assume the role of observer, collaborator and provider of feedback. During this time it is crucial that the teacher candidate have the opportunity to be the lead teacher and to be aware of how s/he is performing in that role.

20 FEEDBACK Provide both formal and informal feedback. Meaningful, systematic observations will enable the teacher candidate to study more in depth the concepts of teaching and learning. Assist the teacher candidate in reflecting on his/her teaching and analyze strengths and areas in which to improve.

21 LESSON PLANNING There is a lesson plan in the handbook Written plans are expected to be shared with the mentor teacher for review. Plans need to always be in writing and include learning targets, goals, assessment, an introduction, sequence of learning activities (what the teacher and students will be doing), and closure.

22 REQUIRED PAPERWORK Observation Data & Feedback form Frequent written comments and feedback Ongoing or on a particular lesson PDEFE (Professional Dispositions Evaluation for Field Experiences These are the dispositions that must all be met by the end of experience. University supervisor evaluation

23 IF THERE IS A PROBLEM OR CONCERN... We want you to feel supported as well. If at any time you have a concern or need additional support, please talk with the university supervisor. Communication is key to a successful experience for everyone involved.

24 THE UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR ROLE The university supervisor is a member of the College of Education faculty who serves as a supervisor/mentor for the teacher candidate, a consultant for the mentor teacher, and a liaison between the College and public school.

25 Oversees the teacher candidates progress. Provides guidance to both the teacher candidate and mentor teacher. Facilitates on-going communication and feedback regarding the candidates effectiveness in the K-12 setting.

26 Conducts both scheduled and unscheduled visits in the classroom to observe the teacher candidate. Guides and supports the candidate in completion of the edTPA. Is required to observe and/or conference with the teacher candidate for a minimum of 12 hours during the semester.

27 BUILDING PRINCIPAL Welcome and introduce the teacher candidate Orient the teacher candidate to school policies. Conduct at least one formal observation and conference and several informal visits. Maintain communication with the WSU supervisor to monitor the teacher candidates progress. Participate in the teacher candidates exit

28 STUDENT TEACHING FIELD EXPERIENCE Calendar Attendance Timelines and Models

29 CALENDAR Teacher candidates will follow the public school's calendar, not the university's, once student teaching begins. Observation week: during the last week of the student teaching experience, the teacher candidate with the aid of the mentor teacher and/or supervisor will arrange observations in other classrooms and/or buildings. There is a suggested timeline for student teaching for both a Traditional path of progression of responsibilities, as well as the Co-Teaching model.

30 ATTENDANCE Teacher candidates must notify mentor teacher and university supervisor if they are going to be absent. Teacher candidate is responsible for giving mentor teacher appropriate plans for the day(s). Absences will be made up to the satisfaction of all involved. Teacher candidates are required to attend student teaching seminars.

31 SUGGESTED TIMELINES AND MODELS Traditional vs Co-Teaching Model Research….. Administration…… Discuss and choose strategies from the models that fit you and your teacher candidate.

32 Suggested Time Line for Student Teaching Traditional Path Week 1 The teacher candidate acquaints, or re-acquaints if returning to the same classroom, him/herself with students, classroom routines, school and classroom disciplinary policies, curriculum guides, and school facilities. Initiative should be taken to introduce him/herself to administrators and other staff members. Begin work with individuals and small groups. Ask questions, discuss observations with the cooperating teacher, and find out about instructional responsibilities for the following week. Week 2-3 Continue the first weeks activities. Teacher candidate and cooperating teacher agree on edTPA focus (content and for secondary which class). Become familiar with beginning class routines, student records and recording procedures. Participate in team teaching with the cooperating teacher. If there is an opportunity, the teacher candidate may observe other staff members. Continue discussing teaching plans and make any written plans for teaching available to the cooperating teacher. Take responsibility for a small group content area activity. Take over one subject area or class, check students work, and record progress. Spring semester secondary teacher candidates may have to plan around the end of the semester and finals. The teacher candidates should begin edTPA task 1, Planning Instruction and Assessment and practice videotaping. Week 4-6 Gradually assume responsibility for more subject areas or classes. Focus first should be the subject/class chosen for the edTPA. Share lesson plans with the cooperating teacher for the areas which responsibilities have been assumed. The cooperating teacher will observe the teacher candidates teaching of each new subject or class and offer suggestions and positive reinforcements. The teacher candidates should complete edTPA task 1, Planning, Instruction and Assessment and practice videotaping. Week 7-8 The teacher candidate has total responsibility for preparing and implementing the curriculum for which they are lead teaching. Task 2 Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning including videotaping should be completed. The teacher candidate and cooperating teacher continue to discuss the written lesson plans and how to implement them. Task 3 Assessment should be completed. Week 9-10 The teacher candidates should upload the completed edTPA materials to Pearson and WSU as soon as complete. Due date will be posted each semester. Work at a pace that you and your cooperating teacher think is best knowing that the sooner your work is submitted the sooner it is scored and returned. The building administrator should be invited to do at least one formal observation during this time. Week Continue teaching responsibilities without the pressures of the edTPA Week The cooperating teacher begins to gradually take back responsibility for the classes. The teacher candidate should have all student progress records up-to-date. The teacher candidate, with the aid of the cooperating teacher, arranges observations in other classrooms and schools. Please note: A Special Education endorsement requires the timeline be accelerated to allow for an additional 5-7 week experience in a special education setting. A Middle Level Math or Middle Level Science endorsement – observations should be done in a middle level math or science classroom. An endorsement in Health and Fitness requires, at minimum, an extended unit taught in both health and physical education.

33 Cooperating teacher consults with teacher candidate and engages in instruction while beginning to take back responsibility for planning and instruction. Week 16 Teacher candidate remains engaged in classroom activities and arranges observations in other classrooms. Cooperating teacher resumes primary planning and teaching role. Suggested Time Line for Student Teaching Co-Teaching Model WeekWeek 1 The teacher candidate observes and supports individuals and small groups; review grading and attendance policies shares curriculum and lesson plans with the cooperating teacher. Cooperating teacher is the sole planner; shares curriculum and lesson plans with the teacher candidate Week 2-3 Teacher candidate should be familiar with and engaged in class administrative tasks. Teacher candidate and cooperating teacher agree on edTPA focus (content and for secondary which class). The teacher candidates should begin edTPA task 1, Planning Instruction and Assessment and practice videotaping. Planning is made explicit to teacher candidate; various approaches to co-teaching should be used to engage the teacher candidate. Week 4-6 Teacher candidate begins planning activities and mini lessons focusing on their assigned edTPA content, and including co-teaching strategies. edTPA task 1, Planning Instruction and Assessment should be completed and candidate should practice videotaping. Cooperating teacher gives planning duties to teacher candidate and reviews all lessons with feedback. Week 7-8 Teacher candidate takes lead in planning and begins to take over additional responsibilities. Co-teaching strategies and solo teaching opportunities are scheduled throughout. The teacher candidate should complete edTPA task 2 Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning, and Task 3 Assessment. Cooperating teacher consults with teacher candidate and engages in instruction. Cooperating teacher gives teacher candidate some solo teaching responsibilities. Week 9-10 The teacher candidates should upload the completed edTPA materials to Pearson and WSU as soon as complete. Due date will be posted each semester. Work at a pace that you and your cooperating teacher think is best knowing that the sooner your work is submitted the sooner it is scored and returned. Week Continue co-teaching responsibilities without the pressures of the edTPA. Week Teacher candidate continues planning and includes all co-teaching approaches. Solo teaching opportunities built in throughout. Teacher candidate remains engaged in classroom activities and arranges observations in other classrooms. Cooperating teacher consults with teacher candidate and engages in instruction while beginning to take back responsibility for planning and instruction. Cooperating teacher resumes primary planning and teaching role. Click to return to webinar menuClick to return to webinar menu.

34 edTPA AREA OF FOCUS edTPA Overview Tasks Academic language Student voice Rubrics

35 edTPA OVERVIEW Required State Assessment Modeled after the National Board Certification process Requires candidates to describe, analyze, and evaluate a learning segment, which a includes a video. and

36 TASKS Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning Task 3: Assessing Student Learning

37 TASK 1: PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT Discuss and choose the learning segment (3-5 hours of connected instruction) content. Assist in the planning of the learning segment lessons in either their assigned elementary content or, at the secondary level, the class period selected for completing the edTPA as soon as is feasible. Assist in gathering information about the school/classroom context (Context for Learning form).

38 TASK 2: INSTRUCTING AND ENGAGING STUDENTS IN LEARNING Assist candidate in obtaining required permission for videorecording Follow District policy, or Use the edTPA Parent Permission form

39 Assist with filming the teacher candidate during the learning segment. Candidates may use any recording device of their own, or available through the building or district. Ensure sound quality before you begin recording. Entire learning segment should be filmed for ample footage to edit. There is great information regarding the video recording process, etc. at

40 TASK 3: ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING Assessment should be completed by the entire class. Three work samples will be used to illustrate analysis. Of the 3 work samples (focus students), at least 1 must be a student with specific learning needs.

41 ACADEMIC LANGUAGE Represents the language of the discipline that students need to learn and use to participate and engage in meaningful ways. Vocabulary Language functions Syntax Discourse (see definitions in edTPA Handbook/glossary)

42 STUDENT VOICE Reflective self-assessment expressed in the voice of the learner. Evidence that students know the learning targets. Evidence that students know how to monitor their progress. Evidence that students know how to access resources and additional support if needed. (Examples may include exit slips, journal entries, or documented conversations.)

43 RUBRICS Use the rubrics (Level 3) to discuss, provide input and feedback as the candidate completes the edTPA tasks. Using the language of the rubrics, be a sounding board as the teacher candidate reflects on experiences with the learners. Click to return to webinar menu.

44 CO-TEACHING AREA OF FOCUS What is Co-Teaching? Why consider? Benefits Co-Teaching strategies Upon what does this model depend

45 CO-TEACHING What is Co-Teaching? Why consider? Benefits Co-Teaching strategies Upon what does this model depend

46 WHAT IS CO-TEACHING? Co-teaching is defined as two teachers working together with a group of students and sharing the planning, organization, delivery and assessment of instruction, as well as the physical space. Both teachers are actively involved and engaged in all aspects of instruction.

47 UPON WHAT DOES THE MODEL DEPEND? Effective communication Planning together Key questions to ask Understanding differences and perspectives A gradual shifting of roles Constant focus on student learning

48 BENEFITS FOR MENTOR Ability to reach more students Better relationship with teacher candidate Opportunity for professional growth Enhanced energy for teaching Hosting a candidate without giving up your classroom Ability to do projects more successfully Class time is more productive Modeling and participating in teamwork Candidates become competent more quickly

49 BENEFITS FOR TEACHER CANDIDATE Improves classroom management skills Increases collaboration skills More teaching time Increases confidence Deeper understanding of the curriculum through co-planning More opportunities to ask questions/reflect Being seen as a real teacher Equal partnership Sharing resources Mutual support and learning

50 BENEFITS FOR P-12 Additional opportunities for individualized instruction. Able to work in smaller groups. Provide multiple teaching strategies. Respond to student questions more rapidly. Lowers pupil/teacher ratio.

51 CO-TEACHING STRATEGIES One Teach, One Observe One Teach, One Assist Station Teaching Parallel Teaching Supplemental Teaching Alternative (differentiated) Teaching Team Teaching Solo Teaching

52 THANK YOU!!! Thank you for your willingness to share your expertise and classroom with our future teachers and your future colleagues.


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