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OH 8-1 Controlling Food Cost in Service and Sales Controlling Foodservice Costs 8 OH 8-1.

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Presentation on theme: "OH 8-1 Controlling Food Cost in Service and Sales Controlling Foodservice Costs 8 OH 8-1."— Presentation transcript:

1 OH 8-1 Controlling Food Cost in Service and Sales Controlling Foodservice Costs 8 OH 8-1

2 OH 8-2 Chapter Learning Objectives Explain the importance of portion control to food cost. Describe the various portion control devices and their uses. Explain the importance of training, monitoring, and follow-through in portion control. Compare the duplicate guest-check system to the point-of-sale (POS) control system for controlling the receipt of money.

3 OH 8-3 Chapter Learning Objectives continued List the benefits of each payment method used by the restaurant and foodservice industry. Describe cash handling procedures used in operations. Complete a daily sales report.

4 OH 8-4 The Major Cost Control Device in Serving Portion Control! Overportioning results in the restaurants owners being treated unfairly. Underportioning results in the restaurants guests being treated unfairly.

5 OH 8-5 The Cost of Overportioning Portions per BoxPortion Size in Ounces Portion Cost in Cents oz = the standard $0.175 If oz$0.20 If oz$0.215 Item: Corn Cost = $2.80 per 3 lb box

6 OH 8-6 Preportioned Items Some menu items come already portioned. 2 oz hot dogs Precut steaks Rib slabs Half-pound frozen hamburger patties Bananas Carton or bottled beverages

7 OH 8-7 Items Not Preportioned Items that are not preportioned must be carefully portioned. To control costs To ensure consistency To ensure a positive price-value relationship in each guests mind To avoid running out of a product

8 OH 8-8 Portion Control Tools Scoops Also known as dishers Used to portion fluid ounces and semisolid products

9 OH 8-9 Portion Control Tools continued Ladles Used to portion liquids

10 OH 8-10 Portion Control Tools continued Serving spoons Slottedused to separate solids from liquids Solidused to serve solids and liquids

11 OH 8-11 Portion Control Dishware Ramekins Used for small amounts of sauces and salad dressings Individual casseroles Typically round or oval oven-proof dishes Range in size from five to twelve ounces

12 OH 8-12 Portion Control Dishware continued Cups Typically hold four to six ounces Bowls Typically hold six to ten ounces

13 OH 8-13 Portion Scales Are used for items portioned by weight Must be kept very clean Can be adjusted to subtract the weight of the container holding the product Are designed to weigh items as heavy as thirty- two ounces

14 OH 8-14 Preportioning Preportioning items prior to the start of a meal period Ensures consistency Reduces errors in portion sizes Speeds production times

15 OH 8-15 Portion Control Training All food production and service employees require portion-control training. Training must be ongoing. Service personnel must be continually reminded of proper portion sizes.

16 OH 8-16 Portion Control Training continued Servers must be very knowledgeable about portion sizes if they are to consistently satisfy their guests.

17 OH 8-17 Additional Management Tasks Monitor and follow through Visually inspect served food items as frequently as possible. Regularly check the sizes of scoops and ladles used for portioning. Ensure proper plate presentation. Portion size Item placement Garnish

18 OH 8-18 Portioning Reports Usage reports tell The number of items issued to the cooks line The number of items sold to guests The number of items returned to inventory Waste reports tell The items returned by guests The reasons for their return

19 OH 8-19 Duplicate Guest Check System Step 1 – Assign guest checks. Assigned at beginning of each shift Each server receives a specific allotment of guest checks. Guest checks are prenumbered. The checks are two-copywriting on one copy imprints the same information on the second copy.

20 OH 8-20 Duplicate Guest Check System continued Step 2 – Server writes the order. This copies the order onto the second (duplicate) copy of the check. Step 3 – Second copy goes to kitchen. The kitchen keeps this copy of the check after filling the order.

21 OH 8-21 Duplicate Guest Check System continued Step 4 – The guest is given the original copy of the guest check as confirmation of the order and as the bill to pay. Step 5 – Guest pays the bill. Typically, the guest pays either the server or a cashier.

22 OH 8-22 Duplicate Guest Check System continued Step 6 – At shifts end, the server returns used and unused checks and all checks are accounted for. Step 7 – Managers collect duplicate checks from the kitchen. Line cooks must safeguard all check duplicates (copies).

23 OH 8-23 Duplicate Guest Check System continued Step 8 – Manager or bookkeeper matches originals with duplicates. Some restaurants Charge servers for missing checks. Discipline servers for missing checks. Terminate servers for missing checks.

24 OH 8-24 POS Systems Cashiers and servers are assigned individual codes. Servers enter orders that are automatically displayed or printed in the kitchen.

25 OH 8-25 POS Systems continued Upon guest request, the server prints the bill. The guest and restaurant retain one copy of the bill. Information about check totals are printed or read at the end of each shift.

26 OH 8-26 Payment Methods Cash Credit cards Debit cards Travelers checks Personal checks Other House accounts Managers accounts Comps

27 OH 8-27 Cash Handling Procedures Before the shift Managers issue precounted bank to cashiers. Cashiers count banks to verify amount. During the shift All cashiers secure cash banks during their shifts. Cashiers collect cash, checks, and charge slips from guests.

28 OH 8-28 Cash Handling Procedures continued At the end of the shift Manager takes cash register readings. Cashiers count drawers and deduct the amount of the starting bank. Cashiers report cash on hand on a Cash Report. Managers prepare a Daily Sales report based on totals from the cashiers reports and cash register readings.

29 OH 8-29 Daily Sales Report

30 OH 8-30 How Would You Answer the Following Questions? 1. Information about a guests meal that was returned to the kitchen by the guest because it was below the restaurants standard would be found on the ( product usage/waste ) report. 2. The acceptance of personal checks by restaurants is ( increasing/decreasing ). 3. The weight of a single portion produced when using a number 8 scoop is A. 8 ounces B. 4 ounces C. 2.5 ounces D (or 1/4) ounce 4. A Daily Sales Report should be completed by ( cashiers/managers ).

31 OH 8-31 Key Term Review Bank Cash handling procedure Cash report Credit card Daily sales report Debit card Duplicate guest- check system

32 OH 8-32 Key Term Review continued Plate presentation Point-of-sale (POS) control system Portion control Portion control device Preportioned item Product usage report

33 OH 8-33 Chapter Learning Objectives What Did You Learn? Explain the importance of portion control to food cost. Describe the various portion control devices and their uses. Explain the importance of training, monitoring, and follow-through in portion control. Compare the duplicate guest-check system to the POS control system for controlling the receipt of money.

34 OH 8-34 Chapter Learning Objectives What Did You Learn? continued List the benefits of each payment method used by the restaurants and foodservice industry. Describe cash handling procedures used in operations. Complete a daily sales report.


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