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1 Fire Alarm Circuit Design and Fire Alarm Control Units Chapter 15 1.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Fire Alarm Circuit Design and Fire Alarm Control Units Chapter 15 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Fire Alarm Circuit Design and Fire Alarm Control Units Chapter 15 1

2 2 Objectives List the types of initiating, notification, and signaling line circuits, and discuss the differences Explain the function of Class A and Class B circuits Demonstrate understanding of the function of an end-of-line resistor 2

3 3 Objectives Compare and contrast the effect of an open conductor, a grounded circuit, and a wire-to-wire short Explain the function and advantages of an alarm verification feature Evaluate the differences between hardwired and multiplex fire alarm systems 3

4 4 Objectives Draw a riser diagram, a fire alarm system plan view, or a schematic fire alarm system diagram for a system Calculate the required battery capacity of a fire alarm system Select a fire alarm circuit based upon predetermined requirements for grounded conductors, wire-to-wire shorts, open conductors, or number of devices on a circuit 4

5 5 Initiating Device Circuits Initiating device circuit (IDC): a circuit to which automatic or manual initiating devices are connected to the fire alarm control unit (FACU), where the signal received by the FACU identifies an alarm condition on the circuit but does not identify the specific device actuated Class B Initiating Device Circuits 5

6 6 Initiating Device Circuits Figure Operation of a Class B initiating device circuit (part 1) 6

7 7 Initiating Device Circuits Figure Operation of a Class B initiating device circuit (part 2) 7

8 8 Initiating Device Circuits Initiating Device Circuit Problems (Faults) –Open conductor: IDC Class B fault that can be caused by a cut or broken wire or a loose terminal –Ground fault: IDC fault that can be caused by a bare wire or terminal in contact with a grounded junction box or some other source of grounding –Wire-to-wire short: two bare wires touch each other, creating an incomplete circuit 8

9 9 Initiating Device Circuits Figure Class B circuit fault conditions (part 1) 9

10 10 Initiating Device Circuits Figure Class B circuit fault conditions (part 2) 10

11 11 Initiating Device Circuits Class A Initiating Device Circuits Initiating Device Circuit Selection (see Table 15-1, Page 465) Initiating Device Circuit Alarm Verification Features 11

12 12 Notification Appliance Circuits Notification appliance circuits (NACs, see Table 15-2, Page 466): fire alarm circuits to which fire alarm notification appliances are connected Class B Notification Appliance Circuits Class A Notification Appliance Circuits 12

13 13 Signaling Line Circuits Signaling line circuit (SLC, see Table 15-3, Page 470): a circuit carrying multiple input and output signals of more than one fire alarm system, transmitter, or device Continuous software interrogation (CSI): microprocessor individually checks status of each device or control unit in sequence, then continuously rechecks devices in order 13

14 14 Hardwired And Addressable (Multiplex) Fire Alarm Systems Addressable (multiplex) system: requires a central processing unit (CPU) or a computer and software that specifies and assigns the exact locations or addresses of each initiating device on the fire alarm system 14

15 15 Fire Alarm Control Units Fire Alarm Riser Diagram Fire Alarm System Plan Schematic Fire Alarm System Diagram Calculating Fire Alarm Control Unit Battery Capacity 15

16 16 Fire Alarm Control Units Figure Fire alarm riser diagram; two wires are shown for each circuit, a Class B system is shown 16

17 17 Ex. 15-1: Calculation of Battery Capacity 17

18 18 Ex. 15-1: Calculation of Battery Capacity 18

19 19 Ex. 15-1: Calculation of Battery Capacity (contd.) 19

20 20 Ex. 15-1: Calculation of Battery Capacity 20

21 21 Ex. 15-1: Calculation of Battery Capacity 21

22 22 Voltage Drop On Notification Appliance Circuits Standard Operating Voltage for Notification Appliances Wire Size, Resistance, and Gauge (see Table 15-4, Page 480) Calculating Voltage Drop in Fire Alarm Wiring 22

23 23 Voltage Drop On Notification Appliance Circuits Figure Illustration of Example 15-2 (follows). 23

24 24 Ex. 15-2: Calculation of Voltage Drop 24

25 25 Ex. 15-2: Calculation of Voltage Drop 25

26 26 Ex. 15-2: Calculation of Voltage Drop 26

27 27 Summary Fire alarm circuits connect initiating devices and notification appliances to the fire alarm control unit that permits the system to meet performance objectives Circuit logic, styles, and isolation can be chosen to increase the reliability of a fire alarm system 27

28 28 Summary Fire alarm control unit (FACU) is the nerve center of a fire alarm system –Can display system logic in riser diagrams, plan views, and schematic diagrams Battery backup for FACU is calculated by determining power requirements for all components in the alarm 28

29 29 Summary Calculation of voltage drop in a fire alarm circuit –Important responsibility for a fire alarm system designer –Provides evidence that notification appliances will work in accordance with their listing 29


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