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Year 11S1 PERIOD 1 – 9 th OCTOBER. In each column which response is stronger? Why?

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Presentation on theme: "Year 11S1 PERIOD 1 – 9 th OCTOBER. In each column which response is stronger? Why?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Year 11S1 PERIOD 1 – 9 th OCTOBER

2 In each column which response is stronger? Why?

3 THE CHALLENGE STEPS Pushing Boundaries The Fire Zone: Challenge yourself to go beyond your own boundaries and see how far you can go! The next step The Confidence Zone: Push yourself to do a little bit more and take an extra step to improve your level/ grade For everyone The Comfort Zone: this is the minimum expectation for each activity

4 Starter: Semi colons & Colons Write a sentence about cake that includes both a semi colon and a colon COPY OUT THE FOLLOWING SENTENCES AND INCLUDE THE CORRECT PUNCTUATION

5 Question 1

6

7

8 Question 2

9 1. In your groups annotate your script response by giving a tick for every quote and two ticks for the effect 2. Work out which mark you would give it and give reasons

10

11

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13 SMART Targets S pecific M easureable A chievable R ealistic T imebound e.g. By the end of term I will be able to identify and explain the effects of language in a previously unseen text.

14 Critical Friends Read the TWO targets that your critical friend has written and check that each one is a SMART target (i.e. I want to be able to complete coursework, I want to be able to write more are not acceptable) Write an EBI comment on the targets and return to your critical friend. Remember to be critical and helpful!

15 Skills work DUE WEDNESDAY 23 rd OCTOBER These clips are great for expanding your knowledge about the world and building your skills in communication and critical thinking

16 Year 11S1 PERIOD 1 – 9 th OCTOBER

17 Speed Gathering WRITE DOWN THE IMPORTANT PIECES OF INFORMATION FROM THIS EXTRACT YOU HAVE 1 Minute! The short story was invented as soon as human beings could talk. One day, one of the first hunter-gatherers went out and had a close encounter with a sabre-toothed tiger. When he came back he gave his family a lurid account of what had happened, no doubt with a little exaggeration thrown in. Later, his wife told the story to some of the other mens wives while they were doing the cooking. And so on. In other words, the short story began as a tale told orally, often around the campfire. As soon as civilisation invented writing, stories began to be recorded on paper. The Bible, of course, contains numerous parables and stories which offer moral lessons and judgements. The Greeks had the fables of the slave Aesop, dating from about the sixth century BC. The Arabian Nights is a collection of stories from Persia, Arabia, India, and Egypt, which was compiled over hundreds of years. In the fourteenth century, Chaucer gave us his Canterbury Tales, which are effectively short stories in verse. Boccaccios Decameron (1353) is definitely a collection of short stories, by any reasonable definition; one hundred of them. The book relates how a group of young people fled from Florence to avoid the plague. While they waited for the disease to burn itself out, they entertained each other with racy stories about wicked priests and randy nuns.

18 Speed Gathering The short story was invented as soon as human beings could talk. One day, one of the first hunter-gatherers went out and had a close encounter with a sabre-toothed tiger. When he came back he gave his family a lurid account of what had happened, no doubt with a little exaggeration thrown in. Later, his wife told the story to some of the other mens wives while they were doing the cooking. And so on. In other words, the short story began as a tale told orally, often around the campfire. As soon as civilisation invented writing, stories began to be recorded on paper. The Bible, of course, contains numerous parables and stories which offer moral lessons and judgements. The Greeks had the fables of the slave Aesop, dating from about the sixth century BC. The Arabian Nights is a collection of stories from Persia, Arabia, India, and Egypt, which was compiled over hundreds of years. In the fourteenth century, Chaucer gave us his Canterbury Tales, which are effectively short stories in verse. Boccaccios Decameron (1353) is definitely a collection of short stories, by any reasonable definition; one hundred of them. The book relates how a group of young people fled from Florence to avoid the plague. While they waited for the disease to burn itself out, they entertained each other with racy stories about wicked priests and randy nuns. WE WILL HAVE ONE MORE GO – WHAT. YOU HAVE 1 More Minute!

19 THE CHALLENGE STEPS Pushing Boundaries The Fire Zone: Challenge yourself to go beyond your own boundaries and see how far you can go! The next step The Confidence Zone: Push yourself to do a little bit more and take an extra step to improve your level/ grade For everyone The Comfort Zone: this is the minimum expectation for each activity

20 Starter: do ONE of the following Write ONE complete sentence using at least 3 pieces of information Write ONE complete sentence using at least 5 pieces of information Write ONE complete sentence using at least 7 pieces of information. Include semi colons and colons For everyone The next step The challenge

21 Question 3

22 1. In your groups annotate your script response by giving a tick for every piece of correct information. 2. Work out which mark you would give it for reading & writing (look at the criteria).

23 SMART Targets S pecific M easureable A chievable R ealistic T imebound e.g. By the end of term I will be able to identify and explain the effects of language in a previously unseen text.

24 Critical Friends Read the ONE targets that your critical friend has written and check that each one is a SMART target (i.e. I want to be able to complete coursework, I want to be able to write more are not acceptable) Write an EBI comment on the targets and return to your critical friend. Remember to be critical and helpful!

25 English Literature The brilliant side of English!

26 Writing a summary Read the extract that you have been given (and with the assistance of the clip) summarise a.the development of Steinbeck as a writer b.the ways in which Steinbecks writing reflects issues and ideas in 1930s America. You should aim to include pieces of information that are drawn from the text but are not lifted (quoted). Aim to write no more than 8 lines.

27 Critical Friends: summary Paragraph TICK CHECK: The paragraph has at least 10 accurate pieces of information TICK CHECK: The paragraph has 8 accurate pieces of information TICK CHECK: The paragraph has 5 accurate pieces of information WRITE DOWN THE CHALLENGE STEP THAT YOU THINK YOUR CRITICAL FRIEND ACHIEVED AND INCLUDE ONE EBI COMMENT

28 Dont Forget: skills work DUE WEDNESDAY 23 rd OCTOBER These clips are great for expanding your knowledge about the world and building your skills in communication and critical thinking

29 Year 11S1 Monday 14 th October Period 1

30 Book marking Feedback

31 STARTER: Synonyms & Antonyms APPLYING ADVANCED VOCABULARY Use at least two synonyms and two antonyms from the tasks above in ONE sentence. CHOOSE MORE INTERESTING SYNONYMS FOR THE PAST TENSE VERBS IN THE LIST BELOW (write both versions in your book) 1. Walked 2. Said 3. Good Write down the word in capital letters and its antonym from the choice below

32 CONTEXT 1.Social: friends, social groups, sporting groups, hobbies etc. 2.Cultural: beliefs, religion, cultural heritage (e.g. a grandparent who is Italian). 3.Historical: the period in which you are growing up (i.e. the 21 st century). What do this mean for your lifestyle? 4.Geographical: where you were born and grew up. Describer theses places. 5.Personal: family, age, appearance etc.

33 1930s America What do you know about it? 1930s America What do you know about it?

34 Group Research Using the laptops, research the aspect of 1930s America that you have been given. Be ready in 15 minutes to present your findings to the class (record the information on A3 paper).

35 Context: 1930s America Living in 1930s AmericaKey Points What was life like for these people? Women African American Migrant worker Farm Owner Child

36 Question 1 Writing Task Take on the role of the person who you researched. Use the information that you gathered to describe what life was like in 1930s America from his/her viewpoint. This should be at least ½ A4 page

37 Critical Friends Feedback - ¼ A4 page written - Some details from research included - SPAG and structure may be inaccurate - 1/2 A4 page written clear details from research included - SPAG and structure may be inconsistent at times - At least 1/2 A4 page written clear details from research included - SPAG and structure is accurate - The piece uses some advanced vocabulary For everyone The next step The challenge CORRECT ANY SPAG ERRORS, INDICATE WHICH CHALLENGE STEP WAS ACHIEVED AND INCLUDE ONE EBI COMMENT AT THE BOTTOM

38 Year 11S1 Tuesday 15 th October Period 1 1.To be able to identify and explain the writers use of symbolism and imagery in a text 2.To be able to identify and explain the writers use of juxtaposition in a text

39 Juxtaposition Symbolism

40 STARTER: The Juxtaposition of symbols Describe these two things in ONE sentence Imagine that you have to explain the terms juxtaposition and symbolism to a Year 7 student. Write down a very brief definition for each (use examples if necessary). Draw a symbol to represent the natural and a symbol to represent the manmade/ material

41 GROUP ANALYSIS 1.In your groups, highlight and annotate TWO quotes that show the writers use of symbolism or imagery. 2.Annotate each quote to explain the meaning/image that is created through the quote 3.CHALLENGE: Highlight the juxtaposition of symbols/images in your paragraph. If you are stuck refer to the hint questions on the flip side of your analysis sheet.

42 iGCSE Question 2 Response Compose a paragraph response to the following question Reread the opening passage from Of Mice and Men and refer to the descriptions of a.the distinctive images of Soledad b.the contrast (juxtaposition) between the distinctive images of Soledad Select words and phrases from these descriptions and explain how the writer has created effects by using this language. Refer to the challenge steps on the next slide as you write. These are based on the iGCSE Question 2 marking criteria. Your response should be at least ½ A4 page.

43 Paragraph Analysis: Opening of the novel The absolute minimum (Pushing into C grade) Some attempt to include quotes (there may be 2-3 quotes) Explanation of distinctive images mainly includes the meaning of words not the effects of techniques. There is little or no reference to the contrasting features of Soledad (juxtaposition) or the use of other literary techniques The next step (Pushing into B grade) The response includes 4-5 accurate quotes There is some explanations of the images created by language and the effects of symbolism and imagery There is some attempt to explain the contrasting features of Soledad (juxtaposition) Pushing Boundaries (Pushing into A grade) The response includes 5-6 quotes The response explain the writers reason for using particular language and explains the images/ideas that are created through symbolism and imagery. Explanations detail the contrasting features of Soledad (juxtaposition) and explain the contrast of symbols throughout Reread the opening passage from Of Mice and Men and refer to the descriptions of a.the distinctive images of Soledad (symbolism and imagery) b.the contrast (juxtaposition) between the distinctive images of Soledad Select words and phrases from these descriptions and explain how the writer has created effects by using this language.

44 Critical Friends Circle swap books in your group 1.Peer mark each othersparagraph by highlighting in different colours the quote, technique and explanation of effects. 2.Now refer to the challenge steps below and indicate which challenge step your classmate achieved and write one EBI comment at the bottom. The absolute minimum (Pushing into C grade) Some attempt to include quotes (there may be 2-3 quotes) Explanation of distinctive images mainly includes the meaning of words not the effects of techniques. There is little or no reference to the contrasting features of Soledad (juxtaposition) or the use of other literary techniques The next step (Pushing into B grade) The response includes 4-5 accurate quotes There is some explanations of the images created by language and the effects of symbolism and imagery There is some attempt to explain the contrasting features of Soledad (juxtaposition) Pushing Boundaries (Pushing into A grade) The response includes 5-6 quotes The response explain the writers reason for using particular language and explains the images/ideas that are created through symbolism and imagery. Explanations detail the contrasting features of Soledad (juxtaposition) and explain the contrast of symbols throughout

45 Success Criteria (linked to challenge steps) To compose a paragraph response using the PEE framework and fulfilling the iGCSE Question 2 expectations To accurately use the terms symbolism and imagery in responses (students aiming for a Band 1-2 should also include analysis of juxtaposition in their response)

46 Dont Forget: skills work DUE WEDNESDAY 23 rd OCTOBER These clips are great for expanding your knowledge about the world and building your skills in communication and critical thinking

47 Express: Student Led Activity

48 Explore: Teacher Led Activity Pushing Boundaries The next step For everyone

49 Plenary For everyone The next step The challenge


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