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Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011 Objective: Students will be able to describe Radiometric Dating techniques. Bellringer: Contrast Relative Dating and Radiometric.

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Presentation on theme: "Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011 Objective: Students will be able to describe Radiometric Dating techniques. Bellringer: Contrast Relative Dating and Radiometric."— Presentation transcript:

1 Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011 Objective: Students will be able to describe Radiometric Dating techniques. Bellringer: Contrast Relative Dating and Radiometric Dating of fossils.

2 Bellringer Review Objective: Students will be able to describe Radiometric Dating techniques. Bellringer: Contrast Relative Dating and Radiometric Dating of fossils. –Relative Dating: Tells the relative age of fossils (older or younger) Based on depth fossil is buried in the Earth –Radiometric Dating: Tells the exact age of fossils Based on amount of radioactive isotopes in fossils

3 Lab Report Title Purpose Hypothesis Materials Procedure Data Analysis Conclusions In todays lab, you will have to write your own Lab Report, which will include all the parts on the left. On the following slides, write down everything that is UNDERLINED to include in your report.

4 Title: Dating Materials Using Half Life of Harlanium-96 Thursday, February 24, 2011 Sue the T-Rex in Chicago

5 Purpose: To use Radiometric Dating to Date Fossils. Ancient Fish Radioactive isotopes are atoms that break down into other atoms over time. Scientists can measure the number of radioactive atoms in an object to calculate the age of the object.

6 Hypothesis: We will be able to know the ages of fossils based on a Radiometric Dating graph. Ammonite (big sea animal in shell)

7 Materials: 100 pennies Shoe box Graph paper Fossils

8 Procedure: Part 1: Creating A Half Life Curve Place 100 atoms (pennies) in a shoe box. Shake the box once and remove any atoms that have decayed (landed heads down). Count the remaining atoms and use this as the number of atoms remaining after the first half life. Record this number in your Data Table and plot the point on your Graph.

9 Procedure continued Continue shaking, counting, and removing for an additional 4 half lives (5 total). Once you have finished your Table and Graph, have your teacher verify that everything is correct before moving on to Part 2.

10 Data Analysis: Data Table Draw this Data Table on your Lab Report. Half Life Years Passed (millions) Number of Atoms Remaining (billions)

11 Data Analysis: Radiometric Dating Graph Draw this graph on your graph paper.

12 Procedure: Part 2: Dating Samples In Part 1, you created an ideal half life graph with your pennies. Now use that to… Determine the age of three different fossil samples (from those labeled A, B, C, D, or E). To help you do this: –Assume every sample originally contained 100 billion atoms. –Assume the sixth half life represents –Know the half life of Harlanium-96 is 100 million years. –Use the amount of Harlanium-96 atoms remaining in the sample to figure out age.

13 Data Analysis: Dating Samples For each fossil sample: 1.Label, with the letter, on the Graph where the sample belongs. 2.Determine how old the sample is based on your graph. 3.Label what period and era the sample comes from. (p. 374) 4.Give an example of what type of organism could make up your sample. (p. 374)

14 Conclusion Questions: 1a) What is the name of the two elements that are used by scientists to date fossils? 1b) Which element is used for really, really old fossils? 2) How old is the Earth and how are scientists so sure of this number?


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