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Welcome to the Fidelity Process Session

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to the Fidelity Process Session"— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to the Fidelity Process Session
October 10, 2011 Western Region WRESA PD Leads need to change this to the correct date and location.

2 Process Planning Activity
An Opportunity to Self-Assess

3 Activity: Stoplight Sort
Individually rate your LEA/Charter Come to consensus Record consensus on Google doc Whole group share – celebrate and communicate In this activity, your table group will read each statement separately and rate the statements based on your district’s or charter’s progress. If you are working in a group not comprised of your PD team, discuss the statements and share where your district or charter is with the members of your table group. You may want to use the Stoplight Sort Handout to guide future discourse with your PD Team when you return to your LEA. These ratings are listed on your handout. Not Yet Started Just Starting Needs Work Near Completion Ready or Completed If you read a statement and know that your district has a clear, specific plan in place and is ready to implement this statement or that your district has already completed this task prior to Summer Institute, rate that statement 5. If you read a statement that your District Professional Development Team has thought about or discussed but that is still not completely realized at this point, rate that statement as a 3. And finally, if you read a statement that your District Professional Development Team has not yet considered or that you are not ready to complete, rate that statement 1. Once your team has individually completed this stoplight sort, come to consensus around each item and fill out the Google doc with your choices. This will allow us to see your progress and assist you accordingly. (Presenter – click to bring up URL once participants arrive at this point.)

4 Celebrate and Communicate
Once your team has chosen what you would like to celebrate as a team and your successful communication methods, put these on a sticky and put them on the corresponding chart paper. Include the name of your LEA/Charter on your sticky note. (Presenter note: When returning from each break, share a few of the post-its with the group. Share some now, share some later.)

5 Evaluating Professional Development
Revisiting Thomas Guskey’s work

6 Activity: Table Talk Review professional development evaluation samples Discuss items which provide meaningful data to help inform future professional development in your LEA/Charter Audio: In this activity, your table group will discuss the evaluation of professional development. If you are working in a group not comprised of your PD team, discuss the statements and share where your district or charter is with the members of your table group. You may want to use the questions to guide future discourse with your PD Team when you return to your LEA. Assuming you are using the data from your professional development evaluations to guide the design of future professional development opportunities, we know that it is important to use the right type of data. Look at the examples of professional development evaluations provided (Examples of PD Evaluations from across the state are on the participant wiki). Discuss which items you believe would provide meaningful data to guide the content of future professional development offerings.

7 Activity: Table Talk Guskey Levels Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
PD Evaluation Methods Focus group conversations Walkthroughs PLCs Anecdotal notes Suggestion box Informal conversations Surveying students Guskey Levels Level 2 Participants’ learning Level 3 Organization support and change Level 4 Use of new knowledge and skills Surveys are not the only way to collect data about the effectiveness of professional development Other methods of getting information to determine what professional development offerings are appropriate. For example, focus-group conversations, walkthroughs, PLCs, anecdotal notes, journaling, informal conversations, vertical alignment conversations, hallway talk, talking to students or surveying students, informal conversations with parents or other community members, suggestion box, principal meeting discussions etc. Discuss feasible methods for collecting and using evaluation data for the following levels in your LEA or charter. Consider the advantages and drawbacks of each collection method and how the evidence collected can be used to improve professional learning and implementation. Level 2 –Participants’ Learning Level 3 – Organization Support and Change Level 4 – Use of New Knowledge and Skills

8 BREAK! 10 minute break – Don’t forget to share some of the “Celebrate” and “Communicate” examples from the chart paper!

9 A Model Approach to Implementing the New Standard Course of Study
This section is intended to serve as a model approach to how LEAs/Charters could acquaint teachers with the new standards for their content area. For this sample, the Instructional Technology standards are used. These are currently in effect and are supposed to be taught in all classrooms. Hopefully, by looking at these standards, it will encourage districts to think about how they are being implemented as well as give them ideas for an activity or two they could adapt for use with teachers in other content areas. Looking at the Instructional Technology Standards

10 Instructional Technology Specialists Contact Information Region 1 Region 5 Amber Bass-Godfrey Ouida Myers Region 2 Region 6 Deborah Goodman Cathy Mathews Region 3 Region 7 Cynthia Sartain Melanie Honeycutt Region 4 Region 8 Julian Nichols-Wilson Mary Lou Daily Mention that this was done in collaboration with the Instructional Technology division and that here is their contact info.

11 Future-ready Students for the 21st Century
“Every public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st Century.” ~State Board of Education Guiding Mission The guiding mission of the North Carolina State Board of Education is that every public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st Century

12 Activity: Information and Technology Standards
Each group receives a packet of clarifying objectives from the “Sources of Information” strand. Order these clarifying objectives across grade levels (K-12) = vertical progression Verify your work with the IT Essential Standards document. Included you will find a Learning Progressions template that we could use to have vertical teams sequence the learning progressions when given the ITES standards from each grade level around a given standard. This activity looks at the "Sources of Information" Strand. Participants will work in groups to identify the order of these clarifying objectives across grade levels. They will then check their order via the "Self Check" Excel spread sheet. This activity provides the opportunity to "see" the progression of standards for a strand of a content/skill area, in this case, the Information and Technology Skills. When working with groups of teachers to do vertical planning, this activity could be replicated for any set of standards.

13 20th Century Classroom 21st Century Classroom Time-based Outcome-based
Focus:  memorization of discrete facts Focus:  what students Know, Can Do and Are Like after all the details are forgotten. Lessons focus on the lower level of Bloom’s Taxonomy – knowledge, comprehension and application. Learning is designed on upper levels of Blooms’ – analyze, evaluate, and create Textbook-driven Research-driven Learners work in isolation – classroom within 4 walls Learners work collaboratively with classmates and others around the world Teacher-centered:  teacher is center of attention and provider of information Student-centered:  teacher is facilitator/coach Little to no student freedom Great deal of student freedom Fragmented curriculum Integrated and Interdisciplinary curriculum What is meant by the “21st Century Classroom?” This distinction can easily be understood through comparison to a 20th century classroom. This table illustrates a few of the ways a 21st century classroom is different from a 20th century classroom. Source: Facilitators should take the time to discuss the differences between the strategies on the left and right. Acknowledge that there are many classrooms that are already 21st century-ready.

14 Harness Your Students’ Digital Smarts
Tell participants that they will be watching a 4 and a half minute video that highlights how a teacher in rural Georgia integrates several 21st century skills into her daily instruction. Let them know that they will have some reflection questions to answer while they are watching the movie. Show the next slide with the questions on it.

15 Harness Your Students’ Digital Smarts
How does this teacher respect the needs of 21st Century learners? How is she an example of a 21st Century educator? How do students in the video demonstrate the 4 C’s? What types of literacies did you observe in this video? Why are they important? How does the teacher create an environment that requires students to think critically? How does this teacher prepare students to be globally competitive? Tell participants that these questions are available on the participant wiki. Once you have read the questions and allowed participants time to find the questions on the wiki, click to the next slide to watch the video. How does this teacher respect the needs of 21st century learners? How is she an example of a 21st century educator? How do students in the video demonstrate the 4 C's (1. Creativity and Innovation, 2. Creative thinking and problem solving, 3. Communication, and 4. Collaboration)? What types of literacies did you observe in this video?  Why are they important? How does the teacher create an environment that requires students to think critically? How does this teacher prepare students to be globally competitive?

16 Harness Your Students’ Digital Smarts
Click the picture to link to the video. If your internet connection is slow, you may want to bring this up in the background before the presentation starts so that you don’t have to wait for it to buffer. After the video, table talk about answers to questions.

17 North Carolina Description
North Carolina's Department of Public Instruction has developed a chart to help explain the attributes of a "future ready" elementary student and a future ready graduate. These attributes are our goal for every student! These two graphics illustrate the skills we attribute to both elementary students and 21st century graduates. Future Ready Elementary Student (Nicky) Future Ready Graduate

18 The P21 Framework Student Outcomes Support Systems
North Carolina is one of the partner states in the development and implementation of this framework for 21st Century Skils. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21) has developed this framework. This graphic highlights our work today. We are concerned with the student outcomes represented by the rainbow section of the graphic. The outcomes include the content areas and interdisciplinary themes, and the 21st century skills. Mention that this is also the basis for the North Carolina Educator Evaluation System process. Participants should be able to access this document which offer definitions of the outcomes to be addressed during this workshop: Ask for a show of hands – how many of you are familiar with this framework? (PD Leads – base your discussion of the next few slides on the responses of the audience.)

19 N.C. Future Ready Graduate
P21 Student Outcomes N.C. Future Ready Graduate Critical thinkers Critical Thinker Problem solvers Effective Problem Solver Good communicators Effective Communicator Good collaborators Strong Team Contributor Information and technology literate Literate consumer of media Flexible and adaptable Self-directed Responsible Worker Innovative and creative Creative/Innovative Thinker Globally competent Knowledgeable Global Citizen Financially literate Financially Literate Citizen To illustrate the connection between the P21 Framework and North Carolina’s representation of Nicky and the Future Ready Graduate, this table illustrates the correspondence of skills. Notice the nuances here, but recognize that North Carolina’s work is based on the P21 Framework.

20 Life and Career Skills Flexibility and Adaptability
Initiative and Self-direction Social and Cross-cultural Skills Productivity and Accountability Leadership and Responsibility Beginning with this slide, we see the details of each of the skills areas. These slides are to refresh peoples’ memories…or show if they haven’t ever seen.

21 Learning and Innovation Skills
Creativity Critical Thinking Communication These are often referred to as “The Four Cs” Collaboration

22 Information, Media and Technology Skills
Information Literacy Media Literacy Information, Communications, and Technology (ICT) Literacy Accessing, evaluating, interpreting, using, and understanding the impact of information in a techno-powered world These fall under the umbrella of “new literacies.”

23 Core Subjects and 21st Century Themes
ELA, World Languages, Arts, Mathematics, Economics, Science, Geography, History, Government and Civics. 21st Century Interdisciplinary themes embedded into the core subjects

24 21st Century Interdisciplinary Themes
Global Awareness Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy Civic Literacy Health Literacy Environmental Literacy

25 Activity: See the IT and 21st Century Skills
In grade-level groups (Elementary, Middle, or High), review a lesson plan that integrates technology. Identify the alignment with the NC Essential Standards for Information Technology. (Provided for some) Identify how the plan aligns to the NC Future-Ready Graduate skills. Make suggestions for 1-2 alternatives for this plan to further align with NC Future-Ready Graduates. Grade K -- Learning about Ezra Jack Keats Students will learn about Ezra Jack Keats using a variety of resources in the media center.  Technology resources used  are TV/VCR, cassette player with 5-6 headphones and 5-6 computers with internet access.  Students will work at stations: A computer stations, video station, listening station, illustration station, browsing station, and a writing station.  Aligned to  KTT.1 (Technology as a tool), and 1st grade 1.TT.1 (Technology as a Tool. Use technology tools and skills to reinforce classroom concepts and activities.) Grade 8 --  Back to the Future! In this lesson, students research the history of an important invention and present what they have learned through and annotated timeline, historical fiction journal accounts, and VoiceThread technology.   Students will use  a small hand-held video camera (e.g. Flip) or web cam, a microphone and VoiceThread to share their  time-travel experiences with classmates.  (This plan has been aligned to the new standards, by they are not posted yet. It is an information Skills plan. ) Grade Laugh and learn with satire and technology -- Another plan that uses VoiceThread. This lesson for 12th grade will help students to distinguish between satire and parody. Students will analyze several examples of both satire and parody, and will work in groups to plan and create their own examples of satire. Teachers are encouraged to use blogging and VoiceThread technology to enhance student interaction. (Aligned to the Information skills essential standards for Grades 9-12 HS.TT.1 -- Use technology and other resource for assigned tasks.  Clarifying objectives HS.TT.1, HS.TT.2, and HS.TT.3)

26 Activity: MILE Guide Self-Assessment Survey
Each individual team member should complete this self-assessment for closure that would allow each individual to self-assess his/her development with regard to competence with the 21st century skills. This could be used as an exit ticket that would give us information about what the needs are for further PD around 21st century skills. MILE=Milestones for Improving Learning & Education We could go through this survey as a large group and remind participants that this is something that can be used with their teachers. At the end, there is a diagnosis and suggestions for where you could go.

27 Here are two suggested readings.

28 A short formative assessment
S.M.A.R.T. Goals A short formative assessment

29 S.M.A.R.T Can you identify the meaning of each letter in the SMART Goal acronym? Discuss at your table Identify each term Robert will lead this part until lunch with the clickers.

30 How many did you get right?
Audio: In this activity, each team member will write down three statements from the PD Inventory that could be an activity to be implemented within the next few months in their school district. Each person will place their sticky in the center of the table. Next, the table group will prioritize two or three ideas for the table. The leadership team is to reach consensus as a group on the two or three activities that would be addressed prior to the next fidelity check. If you are working in a group not comprised of your PD team, discuss the statements and share where your district or charter is with the members of your table group. You must us the PD Inventory to determine the appropriate activity for your PD Team to implement when you return to your LEA.

31 How many did your team get right?
1 of 5 2 of 5 3 of 5 4 of 5 5 of 5

32 Team Consensus A B C D We don’t know how or if SMART Goals guide work in our district. We hope that SMART Goals are used to guide work in our district. We believe that SMART Goals are used to guide work in our district, but can’t identify a specific example. We can identify (and quote) a specific SMART goal that guides work in our district. Which Column Best Describes Your Team’s Knowledge?

33 SMART Goals guide our work
Don’t Know Hope Believe Know

34 Teacher Understanding
If ten teachers in your district were randomly selected and asked what they know about SMART Goals, how many would have a deep understanding?

35 How many teachers would have a deep understanding?
1 or 2 3 or 4 5 or 6 7 or 8 9 or 10

36 LUNCH!

37 Analyze Resources and Needs

38 Activity: Brainstorm What has your district already done or planned to do to update and align district resources to the expectations of the new standards since Summer Institute? Pre-Activity: Put up the question, "What has your district already done or planned to do to update and align district resources to the expectations of the new standards since Summer Institute?" Districts silently and individually brainstorm and put all ideas on sticky notes. Then, as a district, combine all ideas into the top 5 most important (their opinion). Be prepared to share. Take 5 minutes to brainstorm. Use 5 minutes to define top 5 ideas.

39 There will be a poll for each region
There will be a poll for each region. Have 5 different group members enter an idea in Poll Everywhere to speed up the process. Visit and enter keyword “FIDELITYCHECK” and answer. OR text answer to For small cell phone carriers, use this alternate number: (747) Try to use this backup number sparingly. Non-tech version – put sticky notes in groups of 5 and have selected participants share out with the whole group. Top 5 ideas will go on a few pieces of chart paper so that others could peruse during break. Allow 5 minutes. Allow 5 minutes for process the information after everyone has input ideas.

40 Activity: Give one, get one
Each group will divide into 3 pairs. They will take copies of the resources they brought and move to another table. There will now be 3 different LEAs/Charters at a table. Pairs will take turns sharing resources, and as each group shares, the other groups use the Regional Resource Collaboration Guide to take notes, etc. This is posted on the participant website. PD leads – you need to figure out how to easily move everyone so that you have 2 members from each LEA/Charter at a table with 2 members from 2 other LEAs/Charters at the same table. Allow 15 minutes total, including travel time to and from home group.

41 Team Time – Guiding Questions
Which of the resources does your team already have? What did you see that could be useful for your team? How do these resources fit into your team’s current PD implementation plan? Which resources should be the priority for your team? -Team members discuss what they learned in the Regional Resource Collaboration (use document to facilitate conversation). -Start to develop a plan for their next steps. Let participants know that they will have time at the end for creating SMART goals. -The questions on the slide are only to help guide the conversation. PD Leads can add a timer if they want to.

42 Reflective Learning Organizations
Culture Professional Learning Communities Continuous Improvement Data Literacy This section deals with the reflective nature of a learning organization. We will explore the different facets of the organization that encourage reflection. We will begin by exploring culture as one of the four components, which are culture, Professional Learning Communities, Continuous Improvement, and Data Literacy.

43 Activity: Brainstorm Characteristics of a Reflective Learning Organization
Ask each LEA/Charter to use stickies to brainstorm characteristics of a reflective learning organization. This will be a group activity.

44 Building a Reflective Learning Organization
Systems Thinking Personal Mastery Mental Models Shared Vision Team Learning Systems thinking. The idea of the learning organization developed from a body of work called systems thinking.[5] This is a conceptual framework that allows people to study businesses as bounded objects.[3] Learning organizations use this method of thinking when assessing their company and have information systems that measure the performance of the organization as a whole and of its various components.[5] Systems thinking states that all the characteristics must be apparent at once in an organization for it to be a learning organization.[3] If some of these characteristics are missing then the organization will fall short of its goal. However O’Keeffe[2] believes that the characteristics of a learning organization are factors that are gradually acquired, rather than developed simultaneously. For example, you have functioning PLCs, you have a data-literate staff, you have a continuous framework for improvement, good test scores, positive culture, etc. Personal mastery. The commitment by an individual to the process of learning is known as personal mastery.[3] There is a competitive advantage for an organization whose workforce can learn quicker than the workforce of other organizations.[7] Individual learning is acquired through staff training and development,[6] however learning cannot be forced upon an individual who is not receptive to learning.[3] Research shows that most learning in the workplace is incidental, rather than the product of formal training,[2] therefore it is important to develop a culture where personal mastery is practiced in daily life.[3] A learning organization has been described as the sum of individual learning, but there must be mechanisms for individual learning to be transferred into organizational learning.[7] Mental models. The assumptions held by individuals and organizations are called mental models.[3] To become a learning organization, these models must be challenged. Individuals tend to espouse theories, which are what they intend to follow, and theories-in-use, which are what they actually do.[3][5] Similarly, organizations tend to have ‘memories’ which preserve certain behaviors, norms and values.[8] In creating a learning environment it is important to replace confrontational attitudes with an open culture[6] that promotes inquiry and trust.[2] To achieve this, the learning organization needs mechanisms for locating and assessing organizational theories of action.[5] Unwanted values need to be discarded in a process called ‘unlearning’.[8] Wang and Ahmed[7] refer to this as ‘triple loop learning.’ An example of this would be a teacher that has some pre-conceived assumptions about certain groups of students and their ability to learn. At the district level, there are assumptions that the staff has about their ability to influence top-level leadership. Some of these assumptions are evident in the Teacher Working Conditions Survey. Shared vision. The development of a shared vision is important in motivating the staff to learn, as it creates a common identity that provides focus and energy for learning.[3] The most successful visions build on the individual visions of the employees at all levels of the organization,[6] thus the creation of a shared vision can be hindered by traditional structures where the company vision is imposed from above.[2] Therefore, learning organizations tend to have flat, decentralized organizational structures.[5] The shared vision is often to succeed against a competitor,[7] however Senge[3] states that these are transitory goals and suggests that there should also be long term goals that are intrinsic within the company. Team learning. The accumulation of individual learning constitutes Team learning.[2] The benefit of team or shared learning is that staff grow more quickly[2] and the problem solving capacity of the organization is improved through better access to knowledge and expertise.[6] Learning organizations have structures that facilitate team learning with features such as boundary crossing and openness.[5] Team learning requires individuals to engage in dialogue and discussion;[2] therefore team members must develop open communication, shared meaning, and shared understanding.[2] Learning organizations typically have excellent knowledge management structures, allowing creation, acquisition, dissemination, and implementation of this knowledge in the organization.[7] After this content blast, ask them to categorize their stickies under the 5 headings. Give the opportunity to add sticky notes based on new knowledge. Then, they rate themselves 1-5 on each of the characteristics. One represents “Not demonstrated” and 5 is “Distinguished.” There are “cards” on each table that are a refresher for the definitions of each of these titles.

45 Continuous Improvement
PLCs Culture Effective reflective learning organizations have 3 things in common. Effective PLCs, Continuous Improvement model, Data literacy that is built around a culture that supports all 3 components. Tell participants that we will address 3 of the 4 components of reflective learning organizations. We will visit Data Literacy during the Spring Fidelity Check. Data Literacy Continuous Improvement

46 Culture "School culture is the set of norms, values and beliefs, rituals and ceremonies, symbols and stories that make up the 'persona' of the school.” ~Dr. Kent Peterson Dr. Kent Peterson said, "School culture is the set of norms, values and beliefs, rituals and ceremonies, symbols and stories that make up the 'persona' of the school.” Culture

47 Culture Read the article titled, “School Culture Triage.” Complete the School Culture Triage Tool individually according to the directions on page 133. Discuss the results at your table. Participants: *Read article School Culture Triage *Complete the School Culture Triage Tool individually according to the directions on page 133. Mention to participants that the directions tell exactly what to do once you have completed the survey individually.

48 Continuous Improvement
“Collaborative conversations call on team members to make public what has traditionally been private—goals, strategies, materials, pacing, questions, concerns, and results. These discussions give every teacher someone to turn to and talk to, and they are explicitly structured to improve the classroom practice of teachers—individually and collectively.” ~Richard DuFour This will lead into our triangle. Read the quote to participants. “Collaborative conversations call on team members to make public what has traditionally been private—goals, strategies, materials, pacing, questions, concerns, and results. These discussions give every teacher someone to turn to and talk to, and they are explicitly structured to improve the classroom practice of teachers—individually and collectively.” (Richard DuFour) Continuous Improvement

49 Continuous Improvement
What do you have in place in your LEA/School to promote continuous improvement? Table talk for 5 minutes: What framework do you have to support continuous improvement? Who monitors School Improvement Plans/ progress in your LEA? What evidence(s) do you have to show continuous improvement in your district?

50 Professional Learning Communities
"Collaboration is vital to sustain what we call profound or really deep change, because without it, organizations are just overwhelmed by the forces of the status quo." ~Peter Senge Peter Senge said, "Collaboration is vital to sustain what we call profound or really deep change, because without it, organizations are just overwhelmed by the forces of the status quo." PLCs

51 Activity: What are the characteristics of a high-functioning PLC?
Discuss with LEA/Charter Choose top 3 characteristics Be prepared to share out with the group Do Activity – participants will not use sticky notes, they will just discuss and come up with their top 3 characteristics at the table.

52 We ran DuFour’s article, What is a Professional Learning Community
We ran DuFour’s article, What is a Professional Learning Community? through wordle, and this is what appeared. Share Wordle Table Talk: What concepts are not highlighted by the Wordle that are significant to understanding the true nature of a PLC?

53 PLCs Essential Questions What do we want them to know?
How will we know they have learned it? What will we do if they have not mastered it? What will we do when they know it? Discuss these questions at your table using the handout as a guide. (Handout is called Reflective Learning Organization/Fidelity Check Questions for Readiness and is available on the participant wiki) Click to next slide to see what handout looks like.

54 This is what the handout looks like.

55 BREAK! 10 minute break – Don’t forget to share some of the “Celebrate” and “Communicate” examples from the chart paper!

56 Generate SMART Goals to Determine Next Steps

57 Affinity Diagram Prioritize the Stoplight Sort guiding statements that scored 2 or 3. Write them on a sticky note. Prioritize them as a table group. Audio: In this activity, each team member will write down three statements from the PD Inventory that could be an activity to be implemented within the next few months in their school district. Each person will place their sticky in the center of the table. Next, the table group will prioritize two or three ideas for the table. The leadership team is to reach consensus as a group on the two or three activities that would be addressed prior to the next fidelity check. If you are working in a group not comprised of your PD team, discuss the statements and share where your district or charter is with the members of your table group. You must us the PD Inventory to determine the appropriate activity for your PD Team to implement when you return to your LEA.

58 Team Planning Time SMART GOALS
Work on SMART goals as relates to priorities discovered during the Stoplight Sort this morning. Report three ideas that your team will be implementing before the next fidelity check. The chunk of time is set aside for the leadership teams to work on their SMART goals as it relates to the activities that came out of the Stoplight Sort done this morning. Staff will be walking around to support you with this planning time. During this time, there are templates (SMART Goals Setting Worksheet is on the wiki) and planning tools available for your team to use as you work together. Once participants know the task, go the next slide to get them to think about details.

59 Questions for the Action Steps
What is the proposed activity? Who needs to be involved? Who is responsible for doing what activities? What are the performance indicators? What are the milestones? Deliverables? What is the timeframe? As you start to working on the action steps, we want you to make certain you consider the following for each of the tasks or program events you will consider today. The action planning process requires everyone to give their input into what they consider the response to be for each of the SMART Goals. Feel free to ask your facilitator if you need assistance. The SMART Goal Handout as well as a template are available on the participant wiki to serve as a guide for your work.

60 Closure / Evaluation http://tinyurl.com/PlusDelta-FidelityCheck
Plus / Delta Homework  http://tinyurl.com/PlusDelta-FidelityCheck


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